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montmorillonite clay in nature's variety instinct chicken formula canned cat food.

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

i recently have been researching nature's variety instinct canned cat food as an add-on to what i'm feeding my kitties now (innova, wellness). however, upon reading the ingredients i noticed the company uses montmorillonite clay as an "anti-caking" ingredient. i'm wondering how safe this is. excuse my ignorance, but i've never heard of clay being used in canned pet food. i've read the use of this clay has been approved by the usda. i'm wondering about other people's experiences with this canned food. thank you for reading...

 

jlc20m kitty.gif

post #2 of 14
When I was feeding Nature's Variety, my cats did really well on it and liked it. agree.gif When I used the canned, I just picked out the peas and carrots - there's not many of them and they're whole, so easy to remove. laughing02.gif It's a high protein, low carb food, and of the choices out there.... I liked it for my kitties.

There's been a lot of discussion about that montmorillonite clay on here. Here's the most recent - the discussion started a while back, and started up again: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/239950/questions-about-commercial-raw/90#post_3176937

Personally, the ingredient does not cause me concern. It's one of the few high protein, low carb canned foods without carrageenan, and that's an ingredient causes me more concern than the montmorillonite clay - but that's me. smile.gif
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

When I was feeding Nature's Variety, my cats did really well on it and liked it. agree.gif When I used the canned, I just picked out the peas and carrots - there's not many of them and they're whole, so easy to remove. laughing02.gif It's a high protein, low carb food, and of the choices out there.... I liked it for my kitties.
There's been a lot of discussion about that montmorillonite clay on here. Here's the most recent - the discussion started a while back, and started up again: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/239950/questions-about-commercial-raw/90#post_3176937
Personally, the ingredient does not cause me concern. It's one of the few high protein, low carb canned foods without carrageenan, and that's an ingredient causes me more concern than the montmorillonite clay - but that's me. smile.gif

 

i've just read the thread you recommended. thank you for that. so, apparently nature's variety uses both the sodium and calcium version of the clay. i'm still not sure if i'm going to feed this food to my pets. it's frustrating and upsetting when one is trying to feed as natural a pet food as possible. (excluding raw, of course.) thank you, again...

 

jlc20m kitty.gif

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

When I was feeding Nature's Variety, my cats did really well on it and liked it. agree.gif When I used the canned, I just picked out the peas and carrots - there's not many of them and they're whole, so easy to remove. laughing02.gif It's a high protein, low carb food, and of the choices out there.... I liked it for my kitties.
There's been a lot of discussion about that montmorillonite clay on here. Here's the most recent - the discussion started a while back, and started up again: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/239950/questions-about-commercial-raw/90#post_3176937
Personally, the ingredient does not cause me concern. It's one of the few high protein, low carb canned foods without carrageenan, and that's an ingredient causes me more concern than the montmorillonite clay - but that's me. smile.gif

 

i just read the thread you recommended. it's frustrating and upsetting to learn that a company dedicated to natural pet food as nature's variety is using a dangerous ingredient. that they use both forms of the clay in question (sodium and calcium) will most likely cause me to stay away from it. i'm now seriously thinking about adding weruva to my kitties diet now. even with the low fat content. (good for the older ones, not so good for the kitten.) thank you for your resonse! :)

 

jlc20m kitty.gif

post #5 of 14
Every food NV makes has that ingredient. Makes me wonder. They must have a cheap source, is my conclusion. Their claim is that it "removes toxins".

I won't feed NV at all, on principle. Not only do all their lines have the clay, they put fruits and vegetables in everything. And..their customer service is not all that great, they don't take criticism well, in my experience. laughing02.gif Anything you ask, you get a smoke screen answer or links to studies that are 2, 4 even 10 years old.

Before I formed my opinion of NV I did try some of their canned foods. Jennie is the only one who would eat it, the canned food is extremely high in calories, and it raised Mazy's urine pH.

(edit) I just checked their ingredient glossary. I notice it no longer says that the clay "removes toxins". Hmmmmm. Or maybe I read that somewhere else.

http://www.naturesvariety.com/ingredients/list/M
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post

Every food NV makes has that ingredient. Makes me wonder. They must have a cheap source, is my conclusion. Their claim is that it "removes toxins".
I won't feed NV at all, on principle. Not only do all their lines have the clay, they put fruits and vegetables in everything. And..their customer service is not all that great, they don't take criticism well, in my experience. laughing02.gif Anything you ask, you get a smoke screen answer or links to studies that are 2, 4 even 10 years old.
Before I formed my opinion of NV I did try some of their canned foods. Jennie is the only one who would eat it, the canned food is extremely high in calories, and it raised Mazy's urine pH.
(edit) I just checked their ingredient glossary. I notice it no longer says that the clay "removes toxins". Hmmmmm. Or maybe I read that somewhere else.
http://www.naturesvariety.com/ingredients/list/M

 

thank you for this, ottto!

 

jlc20m catman.gif

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post

Every food NV makes has that ingredient. Makes me wonder. They must have a cheap source, is my conclusion. Their claim is that it "removes toxins".
I won't feed NV at all, on principle. Not only do all their lines have the clay, they put fruits and vegetables in everything. And..their customer service is not all that great, they don't take criticism well, in my experience. laughing02.gif Anything you ask, you get a smoke screen answer or links to studies that are 2, 4 even 10 years old.
Before I formed my opinion of NV I did try some of their canned foods. Jennie is the only one who would eat it, the canned food is extremely high in calories, and it raised Mazy's urine pH.
(edit) I just checked their ingredient glossary. I notice it no longer says that the clay "removes toxins". Hmmmmm. Or maybe I read that somewhere else.
http://www.naturesvariety.com/ingredients/list/M

 

thank you for this, ottto!

 

jlc20m catman.gif

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlc20m View Post

i just read the thread you recommended. it's frustrating and upsetting to learn that a company dedicated to natural pet food as nature's variety is using a dangerous ingredient. that they use both forms of the clay in question (sodium and calcium) will most likely cause me to stay away from it. i'm now seriously thinking about adding weruva to my kitties diet now. even with the low fat content. (good for the older ones, not so good for the kitten.) thank you for your resonse! smile.gif

jlc20m kitty.gif

Well, NV sure isn't being very helpful in clearing up the questions about it, that's for sure!
post #9 of 14
Weruva is a good food, no carrageenan in most, no menadione, but it is really really high in carbs.

Here is the nutrient profile chart Dr Lisa Pierson has been working on. the amount of work she put into this is incredible.

http://www.catinfo.org/docs/Food%20Chart%20Public%209-22-12.pdf
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post

Weruva is a good food, no carrageenan in most, no menadione, but it is really really high in carbs.
Here is the nutrient profile chart Dr Lisa Pierson has been working on. the amount of work she put into this is incredible.
http://www.catinfo.org/docs/Food%20Chart%20Public%209-22-12.pdf

ty, otto. maybe better to add it as a rotational food?

 

jlc20m

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlc20m View Post

ty, otto. maybe better to add it as a rotational food?

jlc20m

Yes, Weruva Nine Livers is fed in rotation to one of my cats. She gets it once a week. Even though it's high in carbs, it's low in calories and contains no carraggenan or menadione. The other two do not eat it. smile.gif
post #12 of 14

Hi All


There are a wide variety of clays around the world that are used for an even wider variety of uses. Some of the very best clays are extremely beneficial and therapeutic and many people including myself mix pure calcium bentonite clay with water and drink it daily. Others bathe in it and others yet make poultices and use it for body wraps. On the other end of the spectrum, low grade clays are used industrially in oil refining and drilling. Many kitty litters use a low grade clay as well because of their absorbent properties. Sodium bentonite means that is a predominant mineral in the clay and calcium bentonite means calcium is the predominant mineral behind silica dioxide. Sodium bentonites typically have a much greater absorption ability and are typically of lower quality/grade than a calcium bentonite.

 

Clay in pet food can be a good thing provided the clay is of a high quality. A good quality clay DOES remove toxins. Ask the manufacturer for their 1. mineral analysis and 2. microbial analysis. The former will tell you what minerals are dominant in the clay (silica dioxide is almost always #1 ingredient) and the latter will prove that the clay is 'clean' and has been tested for pathogens such as e.coli, salmonella and the like. Many veterinarians including Dr. Al Plechner, DVM, and Anne Smith, DVM recommend calcium bentonite clay for pet use.There are also M.Ds (Dr. Bill Kellis, Dr. Kemyar Hedayat) and chiropractors (Dr. Greg Melvin, Dr. Jim Pollard) that recommend same for people use. Just do your research and pass any clay through the two filters I suggest and you'll be good to go.


Hope this helps. I will cross post on the other thread mentioned.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LivingClay View Post

Hi All


There are a wide variety of clays around the world that are used for an even wider variety of uses. Some of the very best clays are extremely beneficial and therapeutic and many people including myself mix pure calcium bentonite clay with water and drink it daily. Others bathe in it and others yet make poultices and use it for body wraps. On the other end of the spectrum, low grade clays are used industrially in oil refining and drilling. Many kitty litters use a low grade clay as well because of their absorbent properties. Sodium bentonite means that is a predominant mineral in the clay and calcium bentonite means calcium is the predominant mineral behind silica dioxide. Sodium bentonites typically have a much greater absorption ability and are typically of lower quality/grade than a calcium bentonite.

 

Clay in pet food can be a good thing provided the clay is of a high quality. A good quality clay DOES remove toxins. Ask the manufacturer for their 1. mineral analysis and 2. microbial analysis. The former will tell you what minerals are dominant in the clay (silica dioxide is almost always #1 ingredient) and the latter will prove that the clay is 'clean' and has been tested for pathogens such as e.coli, salmonella and the like. Many veterinarians including Dr. Al Plechner, DVM, and Anne Smith, DVM recommend calcium bentonite clay for pet use.There are also M.Ds (Dr. Bill Kellis, Dr. Kemyar Hedayat) and chiropractors (Dr. Greg Melvin, Dr. Jim Pollard) that recommend same for people use. Just do your research and pass any clay through the two filters I suggest and you'll be good to go.


Hope this helps. I will cross post on the other thread mentioned.

yes, very helpful. thank you!

 

jlc20m

post #14 of 14

Well I don't work for a company that makes money shoving clay into pet food but I have been reading for years about dangerous clay kitty litter is for cats because they lick it and it clumps inside them - they can't digest it and it keeps absorbing moisture like yeast - which cats also aren't supposed to eat - and eventually they die because of the clots that form in their body. I don't see how this is any different and I have never heard of humans eating clay - putting it on their face yes - but never eating it. I don't care what kind of clay it is - if it is absorbent - and all clay is - then common sense tells you that a 10 pound cat should not be ingesting it. This food also boosts that cats gain weight on it - well sure. They have lumps inside them. Sorry - no sale on this clay. I know mendione & carrageenan are very dangerous - so is copper sulfate & sodium selenite - but that doesn't mean I'm going to exchange one toxic poison for another. I have to agree on the Werever truluxe brand too - it is expensive but I bought it to enter into a rotation with home cooked foods using altunin and other brands like Hounds & Gatos, Firstmate, Tiki - I'm nervous because it is made in thailand though & the company has a track record of recalls though so I won't make it their basic food.  But anything with clay goes right out the window - they are just experimenting now with cheap ingredients to see what they can get away with - sorry - stick to the basics and stop using this untested long term fillers - and that includes cranberries. Just because there is an overproduction of cranberries and farmers are selling it cheap - it doesn't mean it should keep getting plastered into cat food. It has benzoic acid - poison - aspirin contains that which is why it is poison - please stop treating pet food owners like idiots.

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