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caloric needs calculator for cats

Poll Results: did this information help anyone?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 70% (7)
    yes
  • 10% (1)
    i already knew
  • 20% (2)
    no
10 Total Votes  
post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 

http://www.franklinvets.com/site/view/197641_FelineCalorieCalculator.pml

 

I found this calorie calculator while searching for information on the daily needs for a cat. you have to allow cookies for the chart to load, but once it does, it will give three figures....un-neutered, neutered and overweight daily requirements. I just thought others might also find a tool like this useful wavey.gif

 

also, here are some lists of canned foods, and their calorie counts zwaai.gif

 

http://www.petfinder.com/pet-care/wet-cat-food-calorie-count.html

 

http://www.petobesityprevention.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Cat_Canned_Pouch_Foods.pdf

 

hopefully this information will make figuring out wet food a little less confusing than it has been for me lol

post #2 of 49
That is great and so appreciated! I think these links will be very helpful to many!!! thanks.gif SO MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!! clap.gifclap.gif
post #3 of 49
Thanks so much! This is very beneficial to me helping Cookie lose weight. clap.gif
post #4 of 49

whoa!

are you sure this is correct?

 

According to the calculator, a 12 lb. healthy neutered cat would need 299 calories a day

 

Currently my boy gets between 165-225 calories  a day (i.e. one normal 5.5 oz  can of wet food). One of the wet food brands I feed him only has 100 calories in a 5.5 oz can so on the days I feed him that one I supplement some extra food from another brand or else give him some raw to give hm some extra calories on that day.

 

(I'm not sure what his current weight is. Three months ago it was 12 lbs, when he turned a year old. He may way a little more now, not sure). He's a very long cat though , and he looks about the right weight to me. He IS always hungry, but he was also a former feral, and would eat and eat til he popped if I let him. 

 

Should I be feeding him more?? I think he'd get too fat if I did. So that calorie calculator seems a bit high to me. The vet did tell me (when I first brought him in as a 6 month old) that he'd end up being a big cat (probably around 15 lbs when full grown). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(he has a shaved belly here, as we shaved it to keep him cool during the very hot summer here). But you can see the shape of his belly better anyway.

post #5 of 49
The calorie calculator definitely does not take into account activity level. frown.gif My cats would be bowling balls if they ate the suggested amount of food. In fact, it overestimated how much they need by 50% (they only needed about 200 calories a day, it says they need 299).

The other issue I have with calorie counters is that it's important to know where the calories are coming from. Calories from carbs are handled very differently by cats than calories from fat or protein.
post #6 of 49

According to the chart l waaaaay overfeed my cats, and they're skinny.

l guess once old age sets in and they're less active, l'll have to cut them back.

Thanks for the link.

post #7 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

 Calories from carbs are handled very differently by cats than calories from fat or protein.

 

How so???

post #8 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:

whoa!

are you sure this is correct?

 

According to the calculator, a 12 lb. healthy neutered cat would need 299 calories a day

 

Currently my boy gets between 165-225 calories  a day (i.e. one normal 5.5 oz  can of wet food). One of the wet food brands I feed him only has 100 calories in a 5.5 oz can so on the days I feed him that one I supplement some extra food from another brand or else give him some raw to give hm some extra calories on that day.

 

(I'm not sure what his current weight is. Three months ago it was 12 lbs, when he turned a year old. He may way a little more now, not sure). He's a very long cat though , and he looks about the right weight to me. He IS always hungry, but he was also a former feral, and would eat and eat til he popped if I let him. 

 

Should I be feeding him more?? I think he'd get too fat if I did. So that calorie calculator seems a bit high to me. The vet did tell me (when I first brought him in as a 6 month old) that he'd end up being a big cat (probably around 15 lbs when full grown). 

I took the chart from a vet site, and the information meshes with what my vet told me when i called and asked for exact feeding instructions for my 14lb cat, whom i am trying to get down to 12lb.......but all cats are not made the same, and if yours is doing well on what he's fed, no reason to let a chart second-guess you smile.gif

My intention when posting this was to take out some of the confusion for those of us who are unknowingly overfeeding our furrbabies, before they get fat and unhealthy from our mistake. My Matt is getting chubby, and it's my fault because I didn't know any better....how many others are there like me who read the feeding instructions on the side of the can, not knowing that they tell you to feed to much? according to the can I should feed my boy about 500calories a day! no wonder he's chubbing up! and a good thing I caught my mistake too........he's been gaining about 1/2lb a month since I got him in February and always fed according to package instructions

doh2.gif

I don't claim to be an expert, I'm only sharig information i found helpful, as a novice cat owner


Edited by Matts mom - 9/19/12 at 2:37pm
post #9 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post

 

How so???

From what I understand, cats don't process carbohydrates and get no nutritional value from them. So they just add fat to them without getting energy.

post #10 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvetone View Post

From what I understand, cats don't process carbohydrates and get no nutritional value from them. So they just add fat to them without getting energy.

that's the purpose of feeding wet, right? less carbs more protein and it's supposed to be better for their urinary tract?

post #11 of 49

Good job Mattsmom  clap.gif

Thanks again :)

post #12 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matts mom View Post

that's the purpose of feeding wet, right? less carbs more protein and it's supposed to be better for their urinary tract?

Yes, that and raw

 

Also with wet and raw, there is less danger of dehydration because cats derive most of their moisture from their food. Cats who eat kibble are dehydrated if they do not drink enough water to compensate for their dry food intake. Even if they do drink water, if their diet entirely consists of kibble, they are most likely dehydrated to some degree, which can lead to health problems down the line. I had no idea about this with my last cat and all he ate was a dry food diet. He was fat, and he had issues with constipation, flaky skin and dandruff, and eventually got cancer. I dont' know if there is a link to cancer because of his diet but I know for sure, all the other problems were because of the dry food. I started to give him wet the last five months of his life (after some severe constipation issues) when I read up some more and realized he needed more wet food in his diet. Even on one 3 oz can of wet a day, his bathroom issues cleared right up. My current cat only gets wet, and some raw, and he does not even drink ANY water from his bowl (or extremely rarely). HIs fur is super shiny and soft, and his weight looks good so far, knock on wood.

 

Anyway, when he died and then I adopted a 5 month old kitten, I read up and did some research on things so that I could do things right with my new guy and not make the same mistakes. It's been a real eye opener and I am kicking myself now knowing some of the things i know now about nutrition and cats. I feel bad about my (RIP) Harley Cat, as there are so many things I could have done differently, but I did not know any better, and my vet never told me otherwise. (In fact, with my new guy, he advised me, after his ffirst vet visit, to switch him from the high quality wet foods I was feeding him to dry Science Diet. lol!

 

Also, sorry, I did not mean to denigrate your chart.

I do, however, think the chart has too high calorie levels. Those might be good if you had a kitten / still growing cat, or EXTREMELY active cat.

But like with anything, you go by feel. If your cat looks fat, start cutting back gradually until he gets down to a healthy weight and then keep the food level the same to maintain weight.

post #13 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvetone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post

 

How so???

From what I understand, cats don't process carbohydrates and get no nutritional value from them. So they just add fat to them without getting energy.

 

If that is what LDG meant, she is mistaken. smile.gif

post #14 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvetone View Post

Yes, that and raw

 

Also with wet and raw, there is less danger of dehydration because cats derive most of their moisture from their food. Cats who eat kibble are dehydrated if they do not drink enough water to compensate for their dry food intake. Even if they do drink water, if their diet entirely consists of kibble, they are most likely dehydrated to some degree, which can lead to health problems down the line. I had no idea about this with my last cat and all he ate was a dry food diet. He was fat, and he had issues with constipation, flaky skin and dandruff, and eventually got cancer. I dont' know if there is a link to cancer because of his diet but I know for sure, all the other problems were because of the dry food. I started to give him wet the last five months of his life (after some severe constipation issues) when I read up some more and realized he needed more wet food in his diet. Even on one 3 oz can of wet a day, his bathroom issues cleared right up. My current cat only gets wet, and some raw, and he does not even drink ANY water from his bowl (or extremely rarely). HIs fur is super shiny and soft, and his weight looks good so far, knock on wood.

 

Anyway, when he died and then I adopted a 5 month old kitten, I read up and did some research on things so that I could do things right with my new guy and not make the same mistakes. It's been a real eye opener and I am kicking myself now knowing some of the things i know now about nutrition and cats. I feel bad about my (RIP) Harley Cat, as there are so many things I could have done differently, but I did not know any better, and my vet never told me otherwise. (In fact, with my new guy, he advised me, after his first vet visit, to switch him from the high quality wet foods I was feeding him to dry Science Diet. lol!

 

Also, sorry, I did not mean to denigrate your chart.

I do, however, think the chart has too high calorie levels. Those might be good if you had a kitten / still growing cat, or EXTREMELY active cat.

But like with anything, you go by feel. If your cat looks fat, start cutting back gradually until he gets down to a healthy weight and then keep the food level the same to maintain weight.

 My Sassy was on dry all her life...and grazing to boot. When she developed tooth decay and i was asked how much she ate, i didn't even know. when they gave her the anesthetic it stopped her heart, and no-one could understand it. She had had  dry skin too, but I thought it was a normal cat thing, and she drank plenty.....through in retrospect she drank more those last couple of weeks. I've been a tad...OK a lot obsessive about Matt's health since we got him, because I couldn't bear to lose another cat to my own ignorance...if I had known that cats needed their teeth cleaned she wouldn't have needed to go under........i will do EVERYTHING differently this time, and will not assume that cats look after themselves......I came out of a dog family, with the misconception that cats are independent pets that only need petting and feeding and a clean litter. my mistake. Sassy was spoiled, and if the vet said she needed something she got it......but the vets don't have all the answers.

 

i feed Matt good quality wet food,having pulled him almost completely off the dry. he only gets 1/8Th cup now to supplement the 5.5oz can he gets each day. I put the dry down in the morning so that he's got something to keep him going till his afternoon feeding, but he knows there's more wet and doesn't always eat it..oh well, I'm not worried. If he's not hungry enough for it,he's obviously getting enough canned :) I just want to do  right by my baby

 

i took no offense to your questioning my sources.....this is the Internet after all and i am new to this site. Even if the calories are a little overblown, at least it's comprehensive for people like me who don't know how to figure it out on their own and that is all i hope forsmile.gif

post #15 of 49

Hey no worries, we are in the same boat. I'm sure my vet thinks I'm overprotective now too, because i call them every time something seems a little off to see if I need to bring Magnus in. I know how you feel about letting your pet get sick due to your own ignorance. I still feel incredibly guilty about Harley and I grew up with cats - but my parents didn't know either, they just put down supermarket brand kibble as none of us knew any better. (of my two childhood pets growing up, one cat died of Cancer and one died of kidney failure from Diabetes - or rather they were both put down when they were at their end stages for both).

 

But I was asking the same questions when I got my cat. How much to feed of wet food? (since I used to just put down a 3/4 cup of dry for my old cat to munch on throughout the day - and before I started measuring, he was free feeding. I'd just top off his dish whenever it was empty). And kittens eat more than adults so it's hard to figure out how much wet to give a kitten. I know a lot of people give wet and kibble to kittens so they can free feed up until they reach a year old, and then they cut out the kibble. I never did this but I was giving about 8-9 oz of wet food when Magnus was still growing.

 

So yeah, it can be confusing. Most people on this site say to feed one can for a healthy adult cat (5.5 oz can). BUT since some have different calorie levels this can be tricky. However, if you rotate brands, so that they don't get the same brand every day, it all balances out. some days they'll have lighter calories, and other days they'll get more, depending on the calories in one can. And just play it by ear and see how your cat does with his weight. And also grain free / high protein foods are supposed to help them to feel fuller because they have less filler.

 

Someone directed me to this website when I was researching food and it was helpful as it discusses dry food vs wet food etc

http://www.catinfo.org/

post #16 of 49

also sorry to hear about Sassy. :(

post #17 of 49
Thread Starter 

I found that website on my own..it's actually the reason i switched matt to wet food. At the time he was on dry only, and his urine odor was strong, so i went looking for reasons that that happens and came up with high ph levels, or uti... caused  by dehydration, in turn caused by dry food,,,but he didn't have all the symptoms yet, so i wanted to nip it. I put him on wet food, with 1/4cup water mixed in, 3x daily so that I knew he'd be getting enough and only gave his dry at night. and it stopped smelling so bad down in the box. i also noticed his intermittent diarreah cleared up on the wet (he's got a sensitivity to something in dry food....corn gluten i think but i can't be sure) with the wet food so I made it his regular diet. I'm not willing to make the leap to raw, because of his belly and not knowing what's wrong with his digestion....but I take note of any food he tolerates well and keep the label, and also keep half the label of any food he doesn't tolerate. That way I only make a mistake on him once.

anything by Hills is out...if it doesn't come up on the floor, it makes a mess in the box, but I don't like the company anyway....no matter how my vet may push it. I like California Natural though, we've never reacted badly to any variety of that and he loves the salmon flavor. friskies is his favorite corner store buy, and it's fancy feast if I'm at walmart. The other one that came up was homestyles....though i don't understand why....must have been the texture?

post #18 of 49
Matt's Mom, I really don't want to derail the thread, but mschauer asked. anon.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

 Calories from carbs are handled very differently by cats than calories from fat or protein.

How so???

Well, it was partially discussed in this thread: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/248651/big-changes-coming-after-next-aafco-meeting and Zoran's article summarizes it all pretty well.



But the protein vs. carb content affects a lot of things.

"Constitutively high rates of gluconeogenesis in cats are adaptive on their natural diet, i.e. when little or no carbohydrate is consumed, but may predispose cats to developing hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, and their metabolic sequelae, on diets that contain significant proportion of ME as carbohydrate." (ME is metabolizable energy)
http://www.springerlink.com/content/435g5033w5338p48/fulltext.pdf?MUD=MP


Or...

"Our analysis indicates that cats have a ceiling for carbohydrate intake, which limits ingestion and constrains them to deficits in protein and fat intake (relative to their target) on high-carbohydrate foods..." and "It is clear, from the dry diet experiments particularly, that there was a carbohydrate intake ceiling for cats at ca. 300 kJ day–1 (e.g. see the horizontal alignment at this value in Fig. 1B,C). This is seen particularly in the dry diet Expts 1, 3, 4 and 5 in which diet pfC was used. Protein intake on days during phase 2 when cats were fed diet pfC was 134, 102, 132 and 141 kJ day–1 compared with the target of 420 kJ day–1. Furthermore, energy intake on days that cats were fed diet pfC during phase 2 of these studies was 514, 475, 552 and 559 kJ day–1 compared with ∼1000 kJ day–1 on the days the other diets were used (see Table 3). Based on a maintenance energy requirement for adult cats of 77.6 kcal kg–0.71 (Bermingham et al., 2010), which equates to ∼1017 kJ day–1 for a 5 kg cat, it can be seen that consumption of dry diet pfC resulted in deficits of both energy and protein intake (relative to the target). The carbohydrate ceiling explains many of the intake patterns seen in both dry and wet diet experiments and suggests that cats may only be able to process ingested carbohydrate up to a certain level. Cats have a number of sensory and metabolic adaptations that reflect their expected low carbohydrate intake (Eisert, 2011), including the absence of a functional sweet taste receptor (Li et al., 2005), low rates of intestinal glucose uptake (Buddington et al., 1991), a lack of salivary amylase and reduced activities (compared with dogs, for example) of pancreatic amylase and intestinal disaccharidases (Meyer and Kienzle, 1991). The reduced enzymatic capacity for digesting carbohydrate may mean that high carbohydrate intake could have untoward effects on cats, with any carbohydrate escaping digestion in the small intestine passing to the colon and providing substrate for microbial fermentation. Indeed, high carbohydrate intake in cats has been shown to increase the concentration of organic acids (i.e. end-products of microbial carbohydrate metabolism) in the colon and faeces and reduce faecal pH, indicating acidosis of the large bowel (Meyer and Kienzle, 1991)." (pfC is the high carbohydrate diet used in the study). Bold - my emphasis
http://jeb.biologists.org/content/214/6/1039.full#R22

Or (and perhaps most importantly)

"..diets with a greater protein content have been used because they minimize the loss of lean body mass (LM)7 during the treatment of obesity (2–4). In a study on felines, Laflamme and Hannah (3) demonstrated conservation of LM during weight loss in cats fed a diet containing 45%
metabolizable energy (ME) from protein. Protein-rich diets may also have satiety-stimulating or thermogenic effects (5), although this effect has been studied very little in cats (6) or dogs (7). Increased protein content in diets for weight loss may be especially important for felines, because these animals show limited adaptation of the gluconeogenic and ureagenic enzymes involved in hepatic protein catabolism to a low amino acid intake (6). In this species, protein catabolism continues to be accelerated even in situations of low protein supply (8), which may occur in
weight loss regimens as a consequence of food restriction (9) .... "

and

"The short-term effect of protein on weight loss was also demonstrated in the present study, because Co cats required greater energy restriction at the beginning of weight loss (0–10% weight loss) to maintain the same weight loss rate as the HP cats. The difference in energy restriction decreased during the second phase of weight loss (10–20% weight loss), when the energy supply became similar for both groups (Table 2). Although the exact mechanism by which protein enables weight loss has not been fully elucidated (5), the postprandial thermogenic effect of
protein and its effect on protein turnover are thought to be involved in the process (33). "

It's also important to note, given the context of this thread (a calorie calculator), "At the start of the MAIN period, mean energy intake for weight stabilization was ;25% lower than NRC (18) recommendations for obese cats, suggesting that using the NRC (18) recommendations is not appropriate for cats after weight loss. A reduction in the energy requirement after weight loss has been observed in humans (34) and in cats (30)."

And... "At end of the MAIN period, the HP group reached the maintenance energy requirement recommended by the NRC (18) for obese cats, although this requirement remained 18% lower in the Co group. These results suggest that the energy requirements for weight maintenance after energy restriction depend on protein intake during weight loss. This could be an important observation, because it is possible that greater energy intake would facilitate long-term maintenance of body weight in cats; this hypothesis should be evaluated further. This assumption is reinforced by a study in humans that demonstrated a lower incidence of weight gain after weight loss in participants who ate more protein during weight loss (4)." (Bold, my emphasis).

And in conclusion ( laughing02.gif ) "The present study confirmed that increased protein intake favors the maintenance of body lean mass during weight loss
in obese cats. The results also suggest that protein may reduce the energy restriction needed for weight loss. Protein intake also seems to act on a long-term basis, resulting in greater energy requirements during the subsequent phase of weight maintenance. These aspects are important for successful weight loss and maintenance in cats and deserve further study."

Co = Control diet for weight loss; HP = High protein diet. The diets were made of the same things and processed the same way, all that varied was the protein and starch content.
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/139/5/855.full.pdf+html
post #19 of 49
And I'm so sorry about Sassy. hearthrob.gifhugs.gif
post #20 of 49
Thread Starter 

actually the carb issue is something I have wondered about too, so i appreciate you dropping in with that.wavey.gif

post #21 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matts mom View Post

I take note of any food he tolerates well and keep the label, and also keep half the label of any food he doesn't tolerate. That way I only make a mistake on him once.
That's a great idea!
Before my cat got allergies, I would write down what flavors and brands he liked and didn't like on a piece of paper so I wouldn't buy something he wouldn't eat, but then I realized it was only fueling him to be picky, so I stopped. :P I still kept the paper though for memories. smile.gif
post #22 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post


But the protein vs. carb content affects a lot of things.
<lotza of stuff snipped>

 

That's all very interesting but could you say in your own words what you think all that means with regards to the thread topic of the calorie requirements of cats? Is it that you think if carbohydrates are included in the diet that more (or less) calories are required?? Or something else??

post #23 of 49
Yes. In no particular order...

1) Carbs do not provide the same sense of "fullness" despite energy and caloric content that protein does. So regardless of the number of calories you find is right for your kitty, they'll feel better if the bulk of the calories are coming from protein and fat, as opposed to carbohydrates. As pet parents, we hate seeing our kitties asking for food - and providing higher levels of protein from animal sources can help prevent us from overfeeding them in the first place.

2) If we do not restrict their food intake, cats that are eating a high carbohydrate diet will either overeat or not eat optimal amounts of protein.

3) People who need to count calories for their kitties are often worried about weight management. To that end, a high protein diet will help kitty lose - and keep off the weight.

4) Finally, for cats that have already LOST weight, unless they were on a high protein diet at the time, the NRC recommendations for energy in terms of calories are typically too high.
post #24 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvetone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post

How so???
From what I understand, cats don't process carbohydrates and get no nutritional value from them. So they just add fat to them without getting energy.

It's not that cats do not derive nutritional value from carbs. They have no dietary requirement for them, and are not built to efficiently digest them. The undigested carbs cause GI problems (I'm wondering if this contributes to IBD? dontknow.gif ). Further, cats do not have the ability to "downregulate" the digestive ... enzymes? ... (I'm not going to go look it up right now, sorry mschauer!) they produce to digest protein. So providing energy in the form of carbs instead of protein can cause things like pancreatitis or apparently contribute to CRF (?) ... organ stress, anyway.

But it is because carbs do not provide the energy they need in the form they need it, free-fed cats may overeat high-carb foods, and THAT makes them fat.
post #25 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

But it is because carbs do not provide the energy they need in the form they need it, free-fed cats may overeat high-carb foods, and THAT makes them fat.
I can testify to this.... A dry diet (measured), not very caloric by the way, and Bugsy did NOT ate very much either -
Calorie by calorie, was roughly what he is eating now - except now he is eating in RAW.

Then: Royal Canin HP - 100% Vegetarian, Plant based, NO meat protein - he GAINED 4lbs and 8 oz
NOW - RAW - Already LOST 3lbs and 3oz slowly, granted, but surely!

Cats are obligate carnivores - their entire system evolved to eat, digest, and thrive by eating meat. In a cat's diet, energy is provided by protein and fat - not carbs.
They have such a small need for carbs, that anything in "excess" will be stored as fat. What is excess? Studies of feral cats have shown that carbs account for only 2.5% DMB of their diet (Platinga study).... Considering that the common dry foods out there can be 25% carbs (Even EVO the lowest is 7%).... one can see how easily a cat can get fat from from eating kibbles.
Edited by Carolina - 9/19/12 at 8:20pm
post #26 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina View Post

Considering that the common dry foods out there can be 25% carbs (Even EVO the lowest is 7%).... one can see how easily a cat can get fat from from eating kibbles.
Psh, I'm pretty sure the average dry food is more like 40%+ carbs.
post #27 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minka View Post

Psh, I'm pretty sure the average dry food is more like 40%+ carbs.
Well, there you have it..... from bad to worst
post #28 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

Yes. In no particular order...

1) Carbs do not provide the same sense of "fullness" despite energy and caloric content that protein does. So regardless of the number of calories you find is right for your kitty, they'll feel better if the bulk of the calories are coming from protein and fat, as opposed to carbohydrates. As pet parents, we hate seeing our kitties asking for food - and providing higher levels of protein from animal sources can help prevent us from overfeeding them in the first place.

2) If we do not restrict their food intake, cats that are eating a high carbohydrate diet will either overeat or not eat optimal amounts of protein.

3) People who need to count calories for their kitties are often worried about weight management. To that end, a high protein diet will help kitty lose - and keep off the weight.

4) Finally, for cats that have already LOST weight, unless they were on a high protein diet at the time, the NRC recommendations for energy in terms of calories are typically too high.

 

I could quibble with the subjective nature of #1 but to stay on topic, how does any of that add up to this:

 

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post

 Calories from carbs are handled very differently by cats than calories from fat or protein.

 

Your statement implies that a cats body somehow treats the calories derived from carbohydrates differently than calories from fat or protein. I don't see how that can be possible. Calories are calories regardless of where they come from. Many of the citations you quoted above have to do with differences in how carbohydrates are processed by cats, not how their bodies utilize the calories derived from that processing. 

 

As far as the NRC energy recommendations or the calculator in the first post or any other method of calculating calories goes, I wouldn't except any of them to come up with an exact caloric requirement for every cat. There are too many variables involved, like the cats activity level, breed, age (maybe?).  In fact, any where you see a such a calculation used you'll also find a blurb stating that the calculation is just an *estimate*.  But as far as I know whatever an individual cats calorie needs are is the same whether the diet contains carbohydrates or not.

post #29 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post

 

I could quibble with the subjective nature of #1 but to stay on topic, how does any of that add up to this:

 

 

Your statement implies that a cats body somehow treats the calories derived from carbohydrates differently than calories from fat or protein. I don't see how that can be possible. Calories are calories regardless of where they come from. Many of the citations you quoted above have to do with differences in how carbohydrates are processed by cats, not how their bodies utilize the calories derived from that processing. 

 

As far as the NRC energy recommendations or the calculator in the first post or any other method of calculating calories goes, I wouldn't except any of them to come up with an exact caloric requirement for every cat. There are too many variables involved, like the cats activity level, breed, age (maybe?).  In fact, any where you see a such a calculation used you'll also find a blurb stating that the calculation is just an *estimate*.  But as far as I know whatever an individual cats calorie needs are is the same whether the diet contains carbohydrates or not.

even the human body uses protein based calories than carbohydrates......if we want to lose weight, carbs are the first thing we cut.....it does make sense to do the same with our kittypets smile.gif

Thank you for once again pointing out that the chart only offers an estimate :)

post #30 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matts mom View Post

even the human body uses protein based calories than carbohydrates......if we want to lose weight, carbs are the first thing we cut.....it does make sense to do the same with our kittypets smile.gif

Thank you for once again pointing out that the chart only offers an estimate :)

 

Actually, to lose weight it is necessary to cut calories not carbs. And even with humans our caloric need doesn't change based on the carbohydrate content of our diet. 

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