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Jerking Cat

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

My male 13 year old cat has had limb and head jerking for about 4 years and it seem to be getting worse.  It happens mostly when he is relaxed.  Some times his whole body will jerk.  The other day he almost lost his balance when his legs jerked while he was sitting at the top of the stairs.  I can find no information on this problem - 2 vets have told me they have no idea what this might be.  Another vet told me that the myeline sheaths on the nerves might be thinning or he might be having  referred  pain from when he was declawed (maybe 13 years ago by another owner?) or that he has a metabolic problem.

post #2 of 30

How can your vet not know it is ideopathic epilepsy and the kitty needs phenobarbital or something like that? There is nothing else it can be if seizures are the only symptom. Epilepsy is diagnosed when there are recurring seizures and no other abnormalities to explain them. I am surprised you still don't know anything four years later because vets should know what epilepsy is and how to treat it. I know about epilepsy because I have it myself and yes, it does happen in cats.

post #3 of 30

Did either vet test the cat for epilepsy> If not, they should have because there is nothing else it can be unless other symptoms are present. Epilepsy is recurring seizures caused by excessive brain activity and diagnosed whether a cause is found or not. Treatment is giving the cat pills twice a day. The disorder itself does not kill cats, but the seizures can cause injuries. Seizures are not painful, but must be controlled for the cat's safety and well-being. I am surprised you found no information about epilepsy in cats (there are websites about it) and no vet told you that is what your cat's problem is. I can say with absolute certainty your cat has epilepsy if nothing else is happening and no other problems were found because I have the condition.

post #4 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your questions, but I have looked online at epilepsy and my cat does not have those symptoms.  His jerking is just now and then and pretty mild except for once in a while when he has a hard jerk.  Basically no vet has done any testing because they had no idea what to test.  I have found one vet who will be doing some testing once I get him in to that person. I will ask about epilepsy, but from what I have read, I don't think so. I just thought someone might have this experience.
 

post #5 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules13 View Post

Thanks for your questions, but I have looked online at epilepsy and my cat does not have those symptoms. His jerking is just now and then and pretty mild except for once in a while when he has a hard jerk. Basically no vet has done any testing because they had no idea what to test. I have found one vet who will be doing some testing once I get him in to that person. I will ask about epilepsy, but from what I have read, I don't think so. I just thought someone might have this experience.
 

Seizures are not the same every time. The same cat can have both mild and severe seizures. Not all of my seizures are the same.

 

If a vet does not know what the problem is, he/she needs to make an educated guess, not just say, "I don't know what to test for."

 

Is this other vet a neutrologist? If so, he/she would definitely know to test for epilepsy. Let me know what happens at that appointment.

post #6 of 30
Has your vet ever witnessed the jerking? My niece's cat had some issues and she recorded one of the incidents with her phone to show her vet to help with a diagnosis. Her cat was having full seizures. From your description I'm not sure if your cat is having the same. Her cat is currently on phenobarbital which seems to be controlling the seizures. There are a few reasons for seizures (and not just epilepsy). The next step for my niece would be a CT scan to see if there is a brain tumor. She doesn't currently have the $1200 to do that though. Sorry I couldn't help more.
post #7 of 30

Hi Jules!

Your story reminds me of another, posted here not too long ago: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/244462/my-cat-is-having-constant-spasms-and-no-one-knows-why-help-me

 

As Abbysmom said, there can be a number of issues behind jerking/twitching/seizure-like movements.

 

I can only offer the steps I would take, were I in your position....and, steps I would be taking for sure when I was observing a seeming progression of frequency in the symptoms.

 

Again, as Abbysmom suggested, I would be gathering as much video evidence as I could, and, I'd be recording continually from here on because of a possible progression.

 

Off the top: if I were within reasonable distance of a Veterinary college, I would have the cat seen there. First of all, these facilities are headed up by leading Veterinary specialists in most fields of specialty, and generally have the most advanced technologies at their disposal. As well, extraordinary cases are sure to draw their attention. There are two ways I know of to avail of those services. First, most of these schools will have small animal hospitals where pets are seen by regular appointment. Then, as well, most do take difficult case referrals from community Veterinarians.

 

This site will show you the closest such college http://www.aavmc.org/Member-Institutions.aspx

 

If I didn't have access to one of these schools, I would first look around for an experienced (translation: one with many years of practice with cats) feline-only Vet and seek a third opinion...and also a referral to a feline Neurologist.

 

Now, for more immediate steps: If you read through the thread I referenced at the top, you'll have read that neurological problems are also found in cats with FIP. and that I had suggested to that poster that she join one of the specialized online groups of guardians of FIP kitties. Again, in your shoes, that's something I'd be doing (because it's so easy) despite the odds (against) that an older cat would begin showing FIP symptoms at such a late life stage.

 

There's also a specialized online group of guardians of cats with seizure disorders. This is the place where you'll find the largest collection of people with the single-minded focus of feline seizure issues. The group's been around for nine years and has over 1800 members - not all of these people will be currently active but, the original founders and a dedicated core of very knowledgeable people are there to hear your story and offer feedback/suggestions/diagnostic assistance, etc. You can bet that I'd be there in your situation. Here's that group: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/epi-felines/

 

I'm hoping that you'll keep us updated, even though your journey will undoubtedly take you elsewhere.

post #8 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the suggestion about filming the jerking.  When he is at the vets he is so stressed that he doesn't jerk.  So I will try to catch it on camera so I have something to show.
 

post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules13 View Post

Thanks for the suggestion about filming the jerking. When he is at the vets he is so stressed that he doesn't jerk. So I will try to catch it on camera so I have something to show.

So stressed that he doesn't jerk? Stress is a seizure trigger, so that does not make any sense.

 

Make sure you record the entire seizure - don't just take a bunch of still shots. It does make a difference. If you see one start try to time it. The vet needs to know approximately how long they are. Mine are always under a minute, but I have seen others jerk five minutes.

 

It is true different problems can cause seizures, so watch her bowls and litterbox to see if she is having any other symptoms.

post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyMayWilcha View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jules13 View Post

Thanks for the suggestion about filming the jerking. When he is at the vets he is so stressed that he doesn't jerk. So I will try to catch it on camera so I have something to show.
So stressed that he doesn't jerk? Stress is a seizure trigger, so that does not make any sense.

Make sure you record the entire seizure - don't just take a bunch of still shots. It does make a difference. If you see one start try to time it. The vet needs to know approximately how long they are. Mine are always under a minute, but I have seen others jerk five minutes.

It is true different problems can cause seizures, so watch her bowls and litterbox to see if she is having any other symptoms.

Emily, you are the only one referring to this as a seizure. Without seeing the cat you have no idea if this is in fact a seizure. Unless a vet sees this jerking/twitching and confirms it to be a seizure, there is no way to know if it is one and we should not assume it is.
post #11 of 30
Thread Starter 

I have an i Touch with a video.  I tried to get it tonight, but it was so subtle, it didn't show up.  I have to get closer.  These jerking movements last only seconds.  I have found a vet that deals mainly with cats and she is going to do some tests.  We do have a vet school, but far away.  The neurologists in the area are quite far away as well.  So I will try this vet and see what she says.  Thanks for all the suggestions and ideas.

post #12 of 30

I would like to know if there is an update on this situation.

My cat is a 10 year old male burmese.

I also have one of his sisters from his litter who is 10 years old also.

Teddy was diagnosed Feb 2012 with hyperthyroidism.

He was diagnosed because I had both cats have a full dental at the vet, and the vet suggested pre anaesthetic blood tests and IV fluids since both cats were over 7/9 years of age.

The vet said that pre anaesthetic blood tests only tested liver and kidney, so I asked the price difference between those blood tests and full precautionary blood tests, as being 9 years old in Jan, they hadn't had blood tests before.

The cost of mini bloods was $120ish and the cost of full bloods was $270.

Thankfully I decided to get the full blood tests, and found that Teddy had early hyperthyroidism. His organs and coat were not yet damaged or affected by untreated hyperthyroidism because it was found early enough.

Teddy has been medicated morning and night with Neomercazole since Feb and he has been tested for his thyroid function since then to make sure his medicaiton is working, and it is.

 

Yesterday in the morning Teddy was sitting on my lap, and I saw his head jerk/twitch about 4 -5 times in a 10 minute period. It was a jerky head movement, and the body didn't appear to jerk. I wasn't able to get any of it on video. I rushed to the vet, as I was worried it may be a related symptom or a sign of seizure.

The vet said to me that a seizure in an animal involves them laying on their side and making swimming like gestures. The vet said this did not sound like a seizure.

 

The vet looked in Teddys ears to make sure there was nothing in the ear causing blockage or irritation. The vet told me to monitor the cat for a week, and if it persists - to do more full blood tests...

 

Here is a video I took. It is probably hard to see but I comment where the behaviour occurs

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151680689382544&oid=261686160573538&saved

post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by skysimone View Post
 

I would like to know if there is an update on this situation.

My cat is a 10 year old male burmese.

I also have one of his sisters from his litter who is 10 years old also.

Teddy was diagnosed Feb 2012 with hyperthyroidism.

He was diagnosed because I had both cats have a full dental at the vet, and the vet suggested pre anaesthetic blood tests and IV fluids since both cats were over 7/9 years of age.

The vet said that pre anaesthetic blood tests only tested liver and kidney, so I asked the price difference between those blood tests and full precautionary blood tests, as being 9 years old in Jan, they hadn't had blood tests before.

The cost of mini bloods was $120ish and the cost of full bloods was $270.

Thankfully I decided to get the full blood tests, and found that Teddy had early hyperthyroidism. His organs and coat were not yet damaged or affected by untreated hyperthyroidism because it was found early enough.

Teddy has been medicated morning and night with Neomercazole since Feb and he has been tested for his thyroid function since then to make sure his medicaiton is working, and it is.

 

Yesterday in the morning Teddy was sitting on my lap, and I saw his head jerk/twitch about 4 -5 times in a 10 minute period. It was a jerky head movement, and the body didn't appear to jerk. I wasn't able to get any of it on video. I rushed to the vet, as I was worried it may be a related symptom or a sign of seizure.

The vet said to me that a seizure in an animal involves them laying on their side and making swimming like gestures. The vet said this did not sound like a seizure.

 

The vet looked in Teddys ears to make sure there was nothing in the ear causing blockage or irritation. The vet told me to monitor the cat for a week, and if it persists - to do more full blood tests...

 

Here is a video I took. It is probably hard to see but I comment where the behaviour occurs

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151680689382544&oid=261686160573538&saved


15 seconds into the video I have linked, you can see the head jolt.

Please note that ALL other behaviour of the cat is normal

Head jolt first seen Wednesday

October 16th 9.30 am. approx 4-5 times in a 5 minute period.

October 17th 10am, 3 times in 2 minute period

October 17th 10.45pm 4 times in 5 minute period (last 2 times in this video)

 

You see the first significant head jolt at 15 seconds, and then there is another one shortly after.

Eating, drinking, pooping, peeing normal. No change in appetite.

Eyes and senses seem normal

Jumping and Playing normal. Still jumping onto bench then fridge, and seeking attention

Alert and awake, no odd behavior. Playful as usual

 

Teddy did vomit up his neomercazole this morning around 10.30am and so I gave him another tablet. I do not think the vomiting is related, as he was vomiting regularly before being diagnosed in Feb, and only stopped vomiting regularly 2 months ago. Thought I'd mention anyways

post #14 of 30
Thread Starter 
That is how my cat Jules was jerking when it started probably about when he was 10 - he is now 14.5.  Interesting in that he had hyperthyroid as well, but he got radiation treatment and it is gone, but not the jerking. He continues to jerk, head, legs, full body, but no seizures.  His hearing is now hyper-sensitive, so I have to be careful about noise since even just putting his kibbles in his bowl causes him to jerk.  I was told to take him to a neurologist who would give him an MRI to see what was wrong.  I don't want him to have to undergo an MRI.  I have talked to many vets about this and none have suggested more blood work - all have indicated that the next step would be the neurologist route.  I just hope that Jules is not too uncomfortable with this - he seems not to mind.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules13 View Post
 
That is how my cat Jules was jerking when it started probably about when he was 10 - he is now 14.5.  Interesting in that he had hyperthyroid as well, but he got radiation treatment and it is gone, but not the jerking. He continues to jerk, head, legs, full body, but no seizures.  His hearing is now hyper-sensitive, so I have to be careful about noise since even just putting his kibbles in his bowl causes him to jerk.  I was told to take him to a neurologist who would give him an MRI to see what was wrong.  I don't want him to have to undergo an MRI.  I have talked to many vets about this and none have suggested more blood work - all have indicated that the next step would be the neurologist route.  I just hope that Jules is not too uncomfortable with this - he seems not to mind.

 

 

Interesting.

Teddy is on Neomercazole.

I don't have the money to spend $8000 on radiation. :( It isn't guarunteed even if I did have the money, and can cause hypothyroidism so you can end up with another disease just as bad, and $8000 poorer.

It's great that your cat didn't have anything go wrong with the radiation though.

Teddy has been seemingly well on Neomercazole. He developed an absyss in August that I believe was forming as early as May because he was scratching his face in a funny way, the absyss didn't break out til August and a steroid injection cleared it up.

He has dandruff mainly on his lower back. The vet has suggested sardines and sold me a box of stuff to put on his food to make both cats skin and fur more oily, and less dry.

 

Update on Teddy

First sign of jerking was in the head only

Tuesday October 15th 9.30ish am he jumped onto my chest and sat still, and his head jerked about 4-5 times over a few minutes

Wednesday October 16th it occured both morning and night. Around 10am and at 10.45pm which is when I filmed the video.

This morning is Thursday October 17th. His head jerked once only this morning.

 

I cuddled him for at least 10 minutes and there was no sign of another jerk. I have been monitoring him all day today and not seen any sign of head jerking.

I have been praying around the clock for Teddy. I will keep monitoring him.

I have sent the vet the video, but he hasn't responded yet.

 

Thank you for your update on Jules. How often does the jerking occur in your cat?

Does your cat have to be monitored 24/7?

Is your cat ever alone? Or unattended?

 

I work from home, so both my cats are monitored most of the time, and they are 100% indoor cats. They do not go outdoors.

I travel 2 months of  the year, so in those 2 months, I have somebody come morning and night to medicate Teddy, and give them both 10 minutes of cuddles morning and night.

post #16 of 30
Thread Starter 

I don't do much of anything for the jerking.  He has had it for at least four years and although it's gotten a little worse, I don' t feel that it  requires monitoring.  He does the jerking every day and I can't really say how often - maybe I observe some sort of jerking five or so times.  I took a video to my vet as well - she did all sorts or neurological and blood tests but couldn't find any problems.  I don't ever leave Jules for any period of time because he won't eat  unless I feed him.  He is very afraid of anyone but me - he hides under the covers when anyone comes over.  I do find that stress increases the jerking, so I try to limit any activities that would cause him stress.  Just recently, I learned that Jules has asthma and had to take him to a different vet for a test to make sure it was asthma.  His jerking was really bad when I brought him home, but not while at the vet..  Actually any time I take him to the vet is not a good time for Jules.

 

So sorry about your cat, but in terms of Jules, it does not appear to be a life threatening problem and mostly doesn't stop him from jumping or cuddling or playing, so I just make sure he isn't in trouble of any kind that in my judgment is causing severe distress.

 

I just wanted to be clear that Jules does not have seizures.

post #17 of 30

My cat Boo also has some weird twitching/jerking movements that are unexplained and have been going on for years. Here's my thread: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/263844/is-boo-having-seizures

 

He still eats, drinks, plays, and he'll be 14 in February. He sees a vet regularly and is generally in good health aside from chronic constipation and mild arthritis.

post #18 of 30

Ok ladies.. I'm not happy with this 'the vet doesn't know' mentality that is going around. I realise if they don't know, it's better for them to tell us they don't know, than to make something up, but I know you ladies are as frustrated as I am. I've read anything and everything online.

Firstly, it looks like these ARE in fact seizures. There are 2 types of seizures.. These head jerk, head tremors are a type called..

 

Types of seizures (human site) http://www.epilepsy.org.au/about-epilepsy/understanding-epilepsy/seizure-types-classification

This youtube video, this lady suggests that diet can cause seizures if there is a high junk content. http://www.youtube.com/all_comments?v=3u2i9IcGnBo

Lets look at Teddys behaviour this week

Vomit monday or tuesday

Tuesday 10amish.. 5 approx head jerks

wednesday morning and evening 4-6 each time again

thursday morning and evening 1 each only

Thursday = lots of vomit in the bedroom - 4 spots on floor, and on bed

Friday (today) morning 7 in a row, then this evening a few

 

After watching the mini seizures or focal seizures on youtube, it seems many cats have them, and some owners have written that there cat was dead soon after, other owners have written that they changed the diet and the seizure behaviour went away.

Interestingly enough, the last 24 hours there was wet food and bickies mixed together in the cat bowl. My friend Beth came over yesterday and commented 'odd that they havn't eaten the food'. She feeds my cats when I'm away.

After reading comments on peoples youtube videos, I realised the first thing the vet asked me was 'what are they eating?' and because they're "pretty much" on just the vet bickies, I didn't suspect that I give both cats 1/8th of a tin of whiskas most days... That's 1/4 tin to share, just to help get their hydration up. I usually douse the wet food in water to force them to drink more to get to the food.

This week I bought Jellymeat (whiskas) by mistake. They like the casseroles, they don't like the jellymeat. What I started thinking is 'what if it's the whiskas?'

 

In the past, Teddy has had to go onto 100% kangaroo meat diet to isolate an allergy when he's got leisions near the ears/eyes in that bald patch.. the idea is that you put the cat on Kangaroo, or goat, something that they wouldn't have built up intolerance to, then when the cat clears up, you introduce new foods to the cat to isolate the trouble causer.

Teddy has had terrible skin reactions to 'temptations' treats in the past...

I googled 'whiskas causing seizures' and I found a couple of comments on other forums, where ladies said that after giving their cat whiskas, the cats had seizures and died.

My vet has told me that whiskas is rubbish, that it's like giving cats Mcdonalds.. I give my cats the vet dental biscuits, but I give them that 1/4th of a can to share each day as a way of keeping hydration up, so I am thinking 'what if I got a dud can, and what if the can of food is causing the problem'

 

Here is my plan.

Cat grass induces vomiting in cats. It is sold at Bunnings in the grass section, and comes in a small pot for $3. I just gave the cats some grass and locked them in the bathroom for a half hour so that any vomit is contained. I am hoping if there is anything yukky in the tummies that the grass will push it out of them.

 

2) I've washed the bowls, and filled them with vet dental bickies. Both cats dived at the bickies like they were starving. Even though they had the jellymeat there to eat before...

I gave hte cats some cooked chicken that I was finished with as well. Neither cat have ever had reactions to chicken.

 

3) monitor Teddys behaviour over the next 60 hours.

It is 10.30pm Sunday night.

in 60 hours it will be 10.30am Monday morning. Hopefully the cat grass will give their tummies a kick start, and I'm hoping that if it is the food causing the head jerking, that the jerking will stop.

 

4) praying for Teddy while I monitor him.

 

Before anyone asks 'if the food is the cause why isn't the other cat reacting' - well, as I mentioned above.. Teddy has had terrible skin reactions to 'temptations' in the past, and tashee never has.. I have no idea why, but obviously teddys sytem is more sensitive.

 

For those of you with similar situation with cats, I would love to see an outline of the diet.. and so fourth.

I will update you all Monday

In the meantime, google what you are feeding your cat and google seizures in the same sentence

post #19 of 30

This ladys cat stopped having jerky head seizures when she discovered he was allergic to perfume and oats

please review

post #20 of 30
Thread Starter 

My vet told me that the jerking was not a seizure.  I read the information on seizures and am not convinced that it is a partial seizure.

How do you determine what a cat is allergic to?  Jules has allergic asthma, but I don't think it is food because his breathing problems are only at night.  Jules is allergic to fish - he and his brother both got feline acne and when I changed his diet, it went away.  He now eats hypoallergenic duck canned food and pork kibbles for cats with kidney problems.  Before that he ate mostly food with chicken.  No change in jerking with any changes in food.

post #21 of 30

I think it's possible that it can be caused by an allergy, but it could also be something a little deeper in the cat's system.

 

How is Teddy's potassium? Apparently, low or high potassium levels can cause twitching. I've read that high blood pressure could also cause twitching, as well as other imbalances (phosphorus and calcium).

 

Didn't you say Teddy has early onset of hyperthyroidism? I believe that can cause twitching, too.

post #22 of 30
Quote:
After watching the mini seizures or focal seizures on youtube, it seems many cats have them, and some owners have written that there cat was dead soon after, other owners have written that they changed the diet and the seizure behaviour went away.

 

 

First, how is your cat doing? Second, where did you read this? In the comments section? Most cats I've seen with this behavior have not died. The only one I saw that died was a black and white cat who was doing something entirely different than the jerking movements Grace does. You have to be careful what you read online. My vet has been frustrated with me because I read so much online and tell him that I think my cat has every disease under the sun and I think he's starting to think I'm a bit neurotic (which I can't deny). I also get tons of anxiety with too much research.. The only thing that's scary that I read was that this could be a sign of brain tumor, if it is indeed focal seizures. However, GoHolistic's cat has had these issues for many years so if it was indeed something like that, she would know it by now. My vet also said brain tumors are extremely rare in cats, moreso in young cats. My vet also said they look at "the horse not the zebra" meaning they try to find the most common problem rather than the more rare issue because it's more likely to be the common thing.

 

I just saw your video and you have a beautiful cat. I also want to add that Teddy's twitching looks very similar to Grace's. Sometimes she gets those little head jerks. I call those the minor ones and then she gets the more powerful ones accompanied with facial twitching where her face whiskers move. She also gets occasional jerking that tips her head to the side and last night what I thought to be some limb jerking.


Edited by WorriedSoMuch - 10/22/13 at 5:14am
post #23 of 30

Grand mal epileptic seizures are really bad, and I would think that these ones are more likely to cause death. I can't even watch videos of cats having these kinds of seizures. It's too upsetting.

 

When I was doing research, the definition of a focal motor seizure seemed to fit Boo's twitching and limb trembling episodes. But who knows if its really a seizure at all. Now that I think back, he's probably had these the last 5-6 years. The feline hyperesthesia syndrome, however, is more recent (last 2-3 years).

 

In the case of Teddy and Boo (both 13 yo), age can be a factor, as some senior cats can develop neurological issues (just like humans).

 

Grace is young, though, so that throws things off.

post #24 of 30

Hi all, I have replied with an update on the Boo and his seizures thread.. I believe it was a supermarket main brand of cat food that caused the issue

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by skysimone View Post
 


15 seconds into the video I have linked, you can see the head jolt.

Please note that ALL other behaviour of the cat is normal

Head jolt first seen Wednesday

October 16th 9.30 am. approx 4-5 times in a 5 minute period.

October 17th 10am, 3 times in 2 minute period

October 17th 10.45pm 4 times in 5 minute period (last 2 times in this video)

 

You see the first significant head jolt at 15 seconds, and then there is another one shortly after.

Eating, drinking, pooping, peeing normal. No change in appetite.

Eyes and senses seem normal

Jumping and Playing normal. Still jumping onto bench then fridge, and seeking attention

Alert and awake, no odd behavior. Playful as usual

 

Teddy did vomit up his neomercazole this morning around 10.30am and so I gave him another tablet. I do not think the vomiting is related, as he was vomiting regularly before being diagnosed in Feb, and only stopped vomiting regularly 2 months ago. Thought I'd mention anyways

Hi ladies, an update on the situation.

Friday the 18th I threw the can of Whiskas jellymeat in the trash. Saturday, Sunday, and Monday there were a couple of jerks, but nothing major. By Wednesday the 23rd the symptoms were barely noticiable...

What do I mean by barely noticable?

Instead of thinking 'WOAH my cat's head just jerked'

I was thinkin g'hmmmm. was that a jerk or just an ear twitch'.. I did see him twitch a leg a couple of times, but if I am sitting in an awkward pose for too long I'll need to twitch my leg so wasn't too worried.

The aggressive head spams seemed to have gone.

Wednesday the 30th, a week after seeing pretty much no symptoms, I went to the supermarket and bought human grade cow beef. that was diced mice sized.

I gave the cats 3 pieces to share, and that evening as Teddy was snuggled up to me, his head jerked twice. I could feel it very distinctly and see it in his sillouette.

Thursday, Friday, and again today I've seen aggressive head motions.

I took Teddy back to the vet today and had $320 full blood test and consult.

The vet said he is going to test Teddys thyroid level, as if the Neomercazole is causing his overactive thyroid to become underactive, a symptom of an underactive thyroid is seizures.

 

The other lady on here with the jerking cat said that her cat had had hyperthyroidism in the past, and that she had the chemo/radiation treatment, it is quite possible that her cats thyroid is now too low, causing the jerks.

 

The vet and I are hoping that it's just an adjustment of medication.

If Teddys thyroid is too low, causing jerks, but not low enough to cause full seizures, it would explain the behaviour and a change in dose would benefit.

I read online that partial seizures are usually always a sign of something else - ie a symptom of something, rather than a disease in themselves, so I'm hoping that in this case it's a symptom of the meds being too high.

I have to wait til Monday for the blood test results, but Teddy has just been twitching, jerking his leg, while he is sleeping.

post #26 of 30

Thanks for the update. It's possible that the twitches/jerks are not related to food. Because of how random they are, it makes it much more difficult to pinpoint what is causing them. Do let us know how the text results come out.

post #27 of 30

I have good news!

 

I also have bad news

 

Good news!!! and the other lady 100% needs to read this.

Low thyroid causes seizures. A thyroid that is going low but not at seizure level will cause the jerks, and the head tremors.

One of the ladies in these threads said her cat had the chemo for the hyperthyroidism. Her cats head jerks are going to be the same as mine. Caused by a thyroid that is now too low.

 

Because Teddy is on thyroid medication, his medication has sent his thyroid down to level 4. Normal is 9-30.

I think Teddys was about 32/33 before being medicated.

 

The vet said that I need to completely halve the dose of neomercazole, which means a half tablet in the morning, and a half tablet at night.

The vet said the twitching and head tremors should be gone within 7 days.

 

 

So it's great news for teddy that he doesn't have a neurological disease of any kind.

 

 

SO what is my bad news?

The bad news is Dr Peter said there are 2 kidney enzymes. One of Teddys is up by 3 points. Teddy will be 10 in January.

Dr Peter said he feels it is likely to be early kidney disease, and that he'd like me to provide a urine sample for testing / confirmation :(

 

I am praying that Teddy had a kidney infection, and NOT a kidney disease!

The vet did also say a cat dehydrated at the time of testing could show this slight spike, but he said Teddy showed no other signs of dehydration and the cell count is normal. Teddys glucose was increased, but the Dr said that cats glucose can spike if stressed.

 

 

BOBBLE HEAD PROBLEM SOLVED.

Kidney situation being tested :/

post #28 of 30

Hi @skysimone I'm sorry Teddy's issues have reappeared but it makes sense about the thyroid issues causing the problems. I hope that know you have a direction to go in, the issue resolves itself. Grace doesn't have thyroid issues, at least I hope not. I had also heard before that kidney problems can cause jerking as well. Grace has never had blood work done as the vet didn't think it necessary given her overall condition and her age. She hasn't had a lot of episodes this past week with jerking that I saw. However, she has a couple other things happening that I'm hoping are nothing. I hope Teddy's kidneys are okay and thanks for keeping us updated.

post #29 of 30

I do hope you can get Teddy's thyroid issues under control, and that it helps with the twitching.  :nod:  Sounds like you are getting to the bottom of this.    hugs.gif

 

I'm sorry to hear about his kidneys.  frown.gif  If it's early enough, there are things you can do to help slow the progression. The FelineCRF website (www.felinecrf.org) is loaded with information.

post #30 of 30

I have a thirteen year old Bombay neutered male who has recently started to jerk his head. He is very healthy and doesn't show any signs of distress. His twitching does not seem to be triggered by stress or anything else. I noticed him doing it a few months back and then it stopped. It just started again recently and, guess what... I had just given him a spot-on treatment for fleas. The more I think about it, the more convinced I am that there is a connection. His small twitches look neurological to me and chemical pesticides can cause neurological damage! I am not a vet but I would urge any pet owner who is noticing similar symptoms in their animals to find out all they can about the anti-flea/tic treatments they are applying. 

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