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How do I tell the breed of my cat?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I got a kitten for me and my kids. we don't know what breed she is or how old  ?

can u please help! Im  new to this whole kitten thing  102_0724.JPG

post #2 of 25

Unless you got the kitten from a registered breeder then it's a domestic or moggie.  Looks 2-3 months old, but it's hard to tell from photos.  Where did he come from that they didn't even tell you his age?

post #3 of 25

Sweet looking kitten, but no particular breed.  Strongly suggest she should have a vet check, vaccinations and worming plus a check for fleas.  Also ask when she should be neutered.

post #4 of 25

Is the kitten shy? she seems to be hiding somewhere, although also comfortable in her hideout.

post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 

no she not shy just like to sleep under the chair 

we got her from wal-mart an old man gave her to my kids

realy good kitten loves kids and dogs

cry's  a lot

post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 

this is a way better photo of Jynx102_0755.JPG
 

post #7 of 25
Eee! She's a cutie!

Most cats are not a breed or even a mix of a breed. Cats are cats biggrin.gif. You can call her a domestic longhair or a moggie (although "moggie" is a rare term in the U.S. so don't expect anyone to know what you're talking about! tongue.gif).

I'd say she's about 2 1/2-3 months old. She should go to the vet for her shots and de-worming very soon. While you're there, make an appointment to have her spayed--cats can go into heat as young as 4 months. Enjoy your new kitty!
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dani Elliott View Post

this is a way better photo of Jynx102_0755.JPG
 

She's a real cutie, it might become clearer if she is a pedigree when she's a bit older.

post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siberian Kitty View Post

She's a real cutie, it might become clearer if she is a pedigree when she's a bit older.

 

No,, without papers nor good proofs it can never be a pedigree.  What he can be is possibly more or less a look alike....

 

With cats it is not the looks, but the ancestry which is most important.  And the "papers" is the pedigree certificate, and thus being written up in the appropriate registry.   Although being pedigree, it is important to have suitable looks, otherwise you count as pet quality, and are not used in Shows nor normally not used in breeding either.

 

Although, a stunning look alike exemplar, apparently being an excellent addition to said breed, may be sometimes accepted by two show judges as "novice" in said breed.

This cat counts as purebred but gets a provisorical pedigree document, and in four generations its children must be deemed at shows, and get their at least the grade excellent, to renew their pedigree... Firstly the fifth excellent generation gets a fully normal pedigree-certificate...

So you see, it is no fancy - "oh this moggy is a pedigree cat".  A pedigree, a pure bred, is a hard won thing.  It is MUCH easier to get US citizenship for an illegally immigrated mexican, than get a pedigree paper for a moggie.  Even if said moggie is somewhat a look alike.   :)    (Although it does happen at least once a century  :)   )

 

 

That salvo said, this new picture IS much better then the first, and little Jynx although domestic  is perhaps a little alike either a Maine coon, or possibly - a Siberian.

Maine coon are of two common types; one the wild-look variation, and one - the sweet-look variation, right?

Jynx is maybe a little alike this sweet variation.   Or what do you think?

 

Nice to fancy about!    :)

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thank you I think that she is a Maine coon, too  yes going to see the vet soon 

thank u all ! She a sweet heart. How do I put weight on her she really thin

  • Been giving her kitten formula with kibble

little wet food too once a day .  whats the best for her

post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dani Elliott View Post ....going to see the vet soon ...

She a sweet heart. How do I put weight on her she really thin

  • Been giving her kitten formula with kibble

little wet food too once a day .  whats the best for her

 

Please do start a new tread on your kitten in the Preg and Kitten care...   :)

With this question and all similiar "how to care about my kitten"

 

 

But a short answer to your question your food looks OK.   Wet food as such is usually good, so keep on with it, and even increase.

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by StefanZ View Post

Although, a stunning look alike exemplar, apparently being an excellent addition to said breed, may be sometimes accepted by two show judges as "novice" in said breed.

This cat counts as purebred but gets a provisorical pedigree document, and in four generations its children must be deemed at shows, and get their at least the grade excellent, to renew their pedigree... Firstly the fifth excellent generation gets a fully normal pedigree-certificate...

Not in the GCCF in the UK.  Domestic shorthair are an acceptable outcross for a tiny number of breeds, but that's as far as it goes.  The outcross cats do not get a provisional pedigree, nor can they be shown.  I'm not even sure how many generations are required for the offspring to be on the full register, and have a feeling it might vary by breed.

 

Way back in the 70s domestic cats that looked like British Shorthairs were taken into the register, but that is way back...

 

Of course it might be different with different countries, registries and breeds.

post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

 

Of course it might be different with different countries, registries and breeds.

 

My described procedure is what is in the big european association FIFE where Im fostered.  I suppose some Indenpendent Clubs also use something similiar.

 

As you say, it may vary with associations (registries) and breeds.  Many breeds are nowadays closed for novices, even in associations who theoretically do use this novice - cathegory.

 

Outcrosses with nice looking moggies you mention may be another way in, but that is a different story, I think.

 

I did wrote up this about novices as it is a very good pedagogical example of the long and difficult way to become a pedigree cat, even for a really nice look alike.   Even that first novice, the ANCESTOR to be, must be accepted and admitted by two experienced show judges, specialists on that breed. 

 

Thus, these somewhat perhaps look alikes are look alikes.

post #14 of 25

According to the National Geographic's world-wide research, all domostic cats are genetically the Little African Wildcat, a cat that was native to Egypt, among other places.  All our current breeds are developed from that species, usually from spontaneous mutations.

 

Your kitten looks like he has a real personality. 

 

There is lots of information here about care, feeding, health, etc., and we're more than willing to answer any questions you might possibly have.
 

post #15 of 25

Found what StefanZ is refering to - see paragraph 9.2:

 

http://www1.fifeweb.org/dnld/rules/br_reg_en.zip

 

But 'novice cats' are not allowed for a great many breeds (or have restrictions on their origins) and even where they are I suspect very, very few would actually get past the judging panel - at least two International judges and must be judged 'Excellent' by both or all.  The cat is only allowed one shot at this as well. 

 

I would like to know how many 'novice cats' actually made the grade in recent years, other than for new breeds or imports from geographical areas, for example Korats from Thailand.  My feeling is the answer is 'amost none'.  Certainly none in the Felis Britanica (UK FiFe Member) results for 2010, 2009 and part of 2008.

 

These days where a breed has colour and/or pattern and/or coat length restrictions (for example chocolate / lilac  / cinammon / fawn / pointed are not allowed in Norway Forest Cats) it would be in my view reckless to take a 'novice cat' in without genetically testing it first to make sure it doesn't carry any of these.  If it does they will, eventually, surface.

post #16 of 25
I kinda don't think old guys are handing out pedigreed purebred kittens in the Wal-Mart parking lot laughing02.giftongue.gif.

She does look to be of the Maine Coon type (they were developed from large shaggy-haired farm cats) but it really can't be said that she IS a Maine Coon, since that would mean that she has pedigree papers.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

 

I would like to know how many 'novice cats' actually made the grade in recent years, other than for new breeds or imports from geographical areas, for example Korats from Thailand.  My feeling is the answer is 'amost none'.  Certainly none in the Felis Britanica (UK FiFe Member) results for 2010, 2009 and part of 2008.

 

These days where a breed has colour and/or pattern and/or coat length restrictions (for example chocolate / lilac  / cinammon / fawn / pointed are not allowed in Norway Forest Cats) it would be in my view reckless to take a 'novice cat' in without genetically testing it first to make sure it doesn't carry any of these.  If it does they will, eventually, surface.

I think StefanZ brings this up every now and then because in Sweden it's still possible and probably not that uncommon either to bring novices to breeds. I checked our local cat associations (FIFé) rules and in Finland you can bring new cats (with Finnish heritage) to European Shorthair, Manx and Cymric. Earlier also Norwegian Forest Cat, Siberian and Russian Blue were on that list too but now they have closed the breeds or restricted them to smaller areas (i.e. Siberians only from old Soviet Union countries are accepted etc.).

Kuura's breeder breeds (or used to breed) also Europeans and Manx/Cymric. She has a registered novice Manx. I also have met few novice Europeans.

 

I'd say novices a brought to shows several times each year. They have just added new rule about them this year to make it easier because the amount of "wannabe" Europeans is quite high (and of course not all of them make it into the breed).

 

Completely OT now but I find it a bit odd that Norwegians have the amber color.. Where did it come from? They have also added a new test for NFO this year, every breeding cat has to be now tested genetically for GSD IV which is a mutation only found from Norwegians.

post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 

I just want to know what breed she looked like and not if she was a pedigree 

she not going to be in any shows she just are house cat and my kids was wondering what she looked like ?rub.gif
 

post #19 of 25
And that was answered, no breed "just" a domestic as the majority of cats are
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 

ok thanks


 

post #21 of 25

BTW in the UK most cat shows have classes for household pets!

 

They are judged on temprement, condition and grooming.  Above all else, the judge is looking for a cat with a lovely nature.

 

However it must also be in good condition (not fat or thin, and muscular), and well-groomed which of course is much easier with a shorthair cat.

 

We can also show pedigrees as pedigree pets, judged in the same way, though once shown as a pedigree pet they can't go back to the normal pedigree classes.

 

All adult cats shown as pets must be neutered - under 9 months they are shown in the kitten classes.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

BTW in the UK most cat shows have classes for household pets!

 

They are judged on temprement, condition and grooming.  Above all else, the judge is looking for a cat with a lovely nature.

 

However it must also be in good condition (not fat or thin, and muscular), and well-groomed which of course is much easier with a shorthair cat.

 

We can also show pedigrees as pedigree pets, judged in the same way, though once shown as a pedigree pet they can't go back to the normal pedigree classes.

 

All adult cats shown as pets must be neutered - under 9 months they are shown in the kitten classes.

 

Quite sure the US also has HHP classes at most shows. There's are adults at 8 months though I think.

 

 

Pedigree pet - is that a pet q pedigree? we cannot show those here, pedigrees must be in the relevant pedigree class. Others are registered as pet only, not for breeding or showing.

post #23 of 25
Quote:

Originally Posted by missymotus View Post

 

Pedigree pet - is that a pet q pedigree? we cannot show those here, pedigrees must be in the relevant pedigree class. Others are registered as pet only, not for breeding or showing.

 

Thing the GCCF's website explains it better than i can:

http://www.gccfcats.org/hhp.html

 

AFAIK, once a cat has been shown as a pedigree pet it can't go back to the pedigree show bench.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowy View Post

I kinda don't think old guys are handing out pedigreed purebred kittens in the Wal-Mart parking lot laughing02.giftongue.gif.
She does look to be of the Maine Coon type (they were developed from large shaggy-haired farm cats) but it really can't be said that she IS a Maine Coon, since that would mean that she has pedigree papers.

Yeah, it's unlikely. What I do think probably happened is that the Maine Coon cat breed was developed from the same general breed of sturdy, large longhaired cats that your kitten belongs to; some cats from that group were developed by breeders into the predictable Maine Coon breed; the rest just kept breeding randomly, as cats tend to do, passing on their similar (but much less predictable) looks. So what she is, is probably a "cousin" to the Maine Coon.

 

By the way, if you are a dog person as well as a cat person, you are probably used to most dogs having an identifiable breed, or an identifiable mix of breeds; you should know that cats are different, with hardly any cats belonging to a particular breed. I think the breeders on here have mentioned that something like less than ten percent of cats belonging to a specific breed. However, because cats do breed randomly and have such a wide selection of possible traits, it's entirely possible to have, completely by chance, a cat that looks like the spitting image of a purebred (though the lookalike cat's kittens will probably not look like that breed, because it's carrying genes that don't have the right traits). It's also possible to get unique, beautiful cats that don't look like any breed at all, but are beautiful nonetheless, like a tortoiseshell cat with a face that's half black and half red, like a harlequin mask, or a pointed cat with short fur and the sturdy build of a Maine Coon, or even oddball genetic glitches like a white stripe down the back skunk-style, eyes that are two different colors, or a cat that looks for all the world like it's wearing a tiny mustache. I hang around the breeder's forum because I like genetics and biology in general, and we often get people who ask "What breed is my cat?", not realizing that most cats don't have breeds; so the best you can do is give a description of said cat's coat color and general body type (which, for your cat, is a rather beautiful blue longhaired tabby with hazel eyes, as far as I can tell with the lighting). I don't think she'll grow up to be quite as big as a Maine Coon, but she might well hit ten pounds, even as a female. She looks big for her age.

 

By the way, since you're new to kittens and this one's a longhair, do remember to get her used to grooming early. Get her used to being brushed and having her claws clipped while she's a kitten, and she'll tolerate it much better when she's grown. I adopted both my cats as adults, and I had to get them used to it so slowly it was ridiculous--one claw at a time, at first! Kittens are much more trainable that way.

post #25 of 25

hi i just wanted to answer your question your cat looks like a "Maine Coon" kitten yes 2-3 months old i have a kitten looks identical to mine, ok have a nice day. bye !!

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