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How old does a kitten have to be to leave its mother?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Hey, I'm new to the site and joined because of my love for cats :)

 

I already have two cats and I've convinced my mother that I can get a kitten (I'm 16 just so you know I'm not some thirty year old living with their mother lol). So in any case I was wondering how old a kitten has to be before it can safely be taken from its mother.

post #2 of 20

We do recommend at least 10 weeks.  Breeders use 12 weeks.

 

When I was young, ie your age, the recommendation was 8 weeks, and probably there are some old folks who still use this limit.

But nowadays, as said, at least 10 w to be with mom and siblings.

 

The ONLY excepions are:  1. Rescued from homeless feral moms,  IF there is a good fosterer / adoption home waiting.  As kittens born homeless ferale are much easier to foster into friendly homecats when young.  Later on fully possible but more difficult.

2. Of course, the unlucky cases. Saved from a kill shelter,  or mom died, etc, etc...

 

 

What cat / kitten are you planning on?  Where are you going to fetch / buy your kitten from?

 

Welcome to our TCS site and our Forums!

 

Good luck!

 

 

ps.  If you are interested in the cardplay Bridge, so Im   junior mentor there too.   :)

post #3 of 20

I wish you well with a kitten, except... 

You say they are your cats, but who will pay the bills - cat litter, food, vets - and who will be cleaning the litter tray?

At 16 you may well be leaving home in a few years.  Finding somewhere suitable for you plus cats will be far harder than just for you - is it fair on your mum to move out leaving her your cats? 

And can you afford to pay for the cat litter, food and vet bills?

 

If you read through some of the 'Cat Health' threads you will find quite a few where people have a cat or kitten but not the money for the vet treatment it sounds like they need.  We all (owners and readers) find that heartbreaking, and occasionally the outcome for the cat is disasterous.

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

I wish you well with a kitten, except... 
You say they are your cats, but who will pay the bills - cat litter, food, vets - and who will be cleaning the litter tray?
At 16 you may well be leaving home in a few years.  Finding somewhere suitable for you plus cats will be far harder than just for you - is it fair on your mum to move out leaving her your cats? 
And can you afford to pay for the cat litter, food and vet bills?

Agree with OS, please give her questions some thought.

As already said 10-12 weeks or older, is the ideal time to adopt. Hopefully you're looking for one already vaccinated, microchipped and neutered as well, which is just one benefit from waiting until 12 weeks
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

Well your questions are valid ones, well I won't be living on my own for a while yet as I have high functioning autism and depression meaning my mum is essentially my carer. The reason I'm getting a kitten even though our household already has two cats is because I'm lonely lol. 

 

Most of the time I help out with the cats that we already have (when I am not studying of course.)  

post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 

I don't know exactly what type of kitten I will be getting as the person we are getting one off of is a friend of my sister and their cat is still pregnant at the moment (and I haven't seen their cat because I do not know them except through my sister.) I live in the uk so I'll be getting them from a small town called Conwy. I'm hoping for a tabby kitten as I love the pattern of their fur (and the fact I already have a ginger tabby and tortoise shell cat.)

 

That or another cat like my Kira :) (The tortoise shell one).

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitofKira View Post

Well your questions are valid ones, well I won't be living on my own for a while yet as I have high functioning autism and depression meaning my mum is essentially my carer. The reason I'm getting a kitten even though our household already has two cats is because I'm lonely lol. 

 

Most of the time I help out with the cats that we already have (when I am not studying of course.)  

 

You can expect cats to live 15 years or more, which is a long time and hence a kitten is a big committment.

 

The other thing is that you can get a kitten, but there is no guarantee it will help with your loneliness any more than the your existing cats, at least once it's an adult - 6 months or so. 

 

I don't know who beyond your mother supports you, but to me this sounds like something you need help from people with, rather than a kitten.

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

 

You can expect cats to live 15 years or more, which is a long time and hence a kitten is a big committment.

 

The other thing is that you can get a kitten, but there is no guarantee it will help with your loneliness any more than the your existing cats, at least once it's an adult - 6 months or so. 

 

 

Thrue.  But hopefully the mom agrees to be a back up here if necessary.  Say, if you move on to a student flat in 3 years away from now, and cats maybe not allowed there.

As she is already a cat owner, a third cat will be no big deal.

 

The more difficult problem is, if it is a KITTEN you want, the kitten will be kitten just about 6-10 months as OS says.  What then?

If KITTENS are important for you, it will be better if you and your mom are foster family for some shelter nearby. This way you will also meet other people, attached to and loving cats.

This way, you will almost always have kittens at your home.  :)

 

But if you want a cat you are sure is attached to you,  as his first choice, not second after your mom. You may try to find an adult cat, at a shelter, preferably an ex homeless, who was astray and hungry a long time. These are often verry grateful for being adopted, and do attach strongly if you are kind to them.

Many forumists here do witness these saved cats do attach even more than bought cats you do own since they were kittens.

 

Good luck!

post #9 of 20

I agree with StefanZ. Fostering is a great way to get kittens, but you're also helping out kitties in need. The hardest thing about fostering is letting them go- but I know it always helps me if I know exactly where the kitty is going and who they are going with, then I know they are getting the best possible home for them :)

post #10 of 20

I don't thinks it's fair that when people ask simple questions on here they always get drilled on who what when where and why they want an animal. She is a young girl, who has two (from what we know) healthy older cats that are more likely than not well taken care of. If she wants a kitten let it be her business. Were just here to answer her questions, not tell her if we think she should have one or not.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by erwinhead View Post

I don't thinks it's fair that when people ask simple questions on here they always get drilled on who what when where and why they want an animal. She is a young girl, who has two (from what we know) healthy older cats that are more likely than not well taken care of. If she wants a kitten let it be her business. Were just here to answer her questions, not tell her if we think she should have one or not.

I agree.  This is a kid.  She asked how old a kitten needs to be before coming home.  She didn't ask your opinions on caring for it and paying for it, etc.  At least she asked... Most kids wouldn't care to.  I think sometimes we all (and I'm guilty of it, too) can come across as kind of judgemental and harsh.  I think that's why a lot of people who post questions like this do not return.  And really that does no one any good.... Especially the cats, which is why we are all here.  I think we need to put ourselves in others shoes before we post and try to be kind and supportive and not judgemental and drilling. 

post #12 of 20
I think some questions are valid, if asked in a friendly way, but they should be accompanied by offers of help and information, especially for first-time owners (which is not the case here). It is all about the tone. I hope Kitofkira and her mom will understand our interest and continue to post about their proposed new arrival.
post #13 of 20

I'm glad people are seeing it from my point of view. I personally come on here and ask every question that pops into my mind, not because I'm an idiot but because I would like to hear what other people think on the topic and see if there are any other ways of doing things. Yes many people on here are very educated with their cats, but I am tired of seeing people posting on every thread on the website here and talking down to everyone. Yes, you have your way of doing things, not everyone has to do it that way. Tone is key when on the Internet and interacting with people you've never before met, if your comment comes across as snooty and condescending, people are more likely to treat you like that. Just a thought.

post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 

I was a bit worried about the questions, but just so you guys know I would take the cat with me if I ever moved away. My other two are healthy and always have been expect for my boy cat who broke one of his legs a year ago but his leg is fine and doesn't give him any trouble since it healed, my boy cat Kit is six and Kira my girl cat is eight or nine she was a cat when we got her so I'm not too sure of her age.

 

And I know cats live up to 15 years, my white Cat Snowy who is dead now R.I.P, well she was 16 or 17 when she died. She even had ear cancer and she fought it and won and lived till she was her fore mentioned age of death.

 

Anyway, I was actually wrong about the kittens having not been born yet. My sister was just waiting till she could get her friends to agree for me to come and look at them, so I went over last tuesday to pick mine before I can take it home when it's older.

 

Here's a picture, her name is Iris.

My soon to be kitten, Iris.

 

 

Here's a close up

 

A close up of Iris.

 

 

I can't wait to pick her up in a few weeks. :)

 

She was the one I was drawn to out of the litter. I love her already, and she's not even living with me yet!

post #15 of 20

My son, who will be 9 next Tuesday, is high functioning autistic. He takes wonderful care of our cats & kittens. Dont let autism get you down or hold you back!

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KitofKira View Post

Well your questions are valid ones, well I won't be living on my own for a while yet as I have high functioning autism and depression meaning my mum is essentially my carer. The reason I'm getting a kitten even though our household already has two cats is because I'm lonely lol. 

 

Most of the time I help out with the cats that we already have (when I am not studying of course.)  

post #16 of 20

Your kitten is a DOLL!!  I know you will love her and give her a wonderful home!!  And remember, you don't have to answer any questions that make you uncomfortable, OK.  You just don't reply to it or say "I don't think I want to answer that question."  Lots of information is none of anyone else's business!  What's important is you have a kitten that you can take home in a few weeks and you know the answer to the question you asked.

post #17 of 20

She is adorable!
 

post #18 of 20

Congrats! I am very happy for you and I hope you love this little kitten every day you have her :] I am very very excited to hear about it as she grows :]

post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, when I bring her home I'll upload pictures to document her descent in to cat-hood :)

post #20 of 20

You might see if you can convince your sister's friend to spay her momma cat once all the kittens are weaned (~12 weeks old) or have new homes.

 

Good luck with Iris!

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