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My cat's cholesterol is too high, what should I do? - Page 3

post #61 of 77

 

Quote:
Originally posted by space1101
Violet, has the holistic vet helped that kitten?

 

 
Oh yes. She started by treating the liver because of two of the blood values and advised me about what kinds of protein sources to use and which ones to avoid.
To use: chicken, turkey, fish
To avoid: lamb and beef because they are high in saturated fat and cholesterol
 
Basically that was it. In time the kidney values went down to the normal range along with the other values, so for those no special treatment was necessary. (They were not dangerously elevated in the first place, just some. It was a warning nevertheless.) 
There is no doubt in my mind that the good diet made it possible and easy for them to recover.)

 

post #62 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post





 
Oh yes. She started by treating the liver because of two of the blood values and advised me about what kinds of protein sources to use and which ones to avoid.
To use: chicken, turkey, fish
To avoid: lamb and beef because they are high in saturated fat and cholesterol
 
Basically that was it. In time the kidney values went down to the normal range along with the other values, so for those no special treatment was necessary. (They were not dangerously elevated in the first place, just some. It was a warning nevertheless.) 
There is no doubt in my mind that the good diet made it possible and easy for them to recover.)


Violet - I think Rabbit can be added to that safe list, do you?
post #63 of 77
Oh absolutely. Great low-fat protein source and, if the info I have on it is correct, it's also very high in   B12. Good food. 
post #64 of 77

 

Originally Posted by Violet

Originally posted by space1101
Violet, has the holistic vet helped that kitten?

 

Oh yes. She started by treating the liver because of two of the blood values and advised me about what kinds of protein sources to use and which ones to avoid.
To use: chicken, turkey, fish
To avoid: lamb and beef because they are high in saturated fat and cholesterol
 
Basically that was it. In time the kidney values went down to the normal range along with the other values, so for those no special treatment was necessary. (They were not dangerously elevated in the first place, just some. It was a warning nevertheless.) 
There is no doubt in my mind that the good diet made it possible and easy for them to recover.)


These are the recommendations for people, not necessarily cats.

 

For one, fish should be avoided except for very, very small amounts - and only wild-caught, small-sized fish (like sardines) should then be fed - because they can cause quite a few problems for cats: Why Fish is Dangerous for Cats and Eight strikes against fishy feeding.

 

And, two, I've never seen anything to indicate an issue with beef and lamb. Cats aren't people, they're obligate carnivores who eat meat - all meat! - and don't suffer the same issues as people (who are omnivores). The key is to feed a variety of animal protein sources, not just one or two.

 

Dr. Peterson is a well-reknowned endocrinologist and his column makes for fascinating reading. Here are a couple that discuss protein intake: Is It Feasible for Older Cats to Ingest the Optimal Amounts of Protein They Need Each Day? and Can Increasing the Amount of Fat or Carbohydrate in a Cat's Diet Compensate for Low Protein Intake?

 

And please do not make rabbit a primary meat source, it should only be one among many. Cats, unlike people, *need at least 25%* fat in their diet. Rabbit is a great food - but ONLY in rotation with other meat sources.

 

Really, Space, the changes you've already made - getting rid of the olive oil, etc. - should be all that you need to do. I strongly recommend against putting your cat on a low-fat diet.

 

Best regards.

 

AC

post #65 of 77
All I can do is shake my head in disbelief at all this. Very sad and troubling.
post #66 of 77
Thread Starter 

 

I see some canned food that Hercules likes also have very hight fat. (like nature's variety canned has fat content as high as 32%DM).  Is there any way I can change it?  Should I stop feeding those foods completely, or can I add something to reduce fat?

 

post #67 of 77
Thread Starter 

I wonder why thrombos or clogged blood vessel happened.  Is it caused by food?  What can we do to prevent it?

post #68 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by space1101 View Post

 
I see some canned food that Hercules likes also have very hight fat. (like nature's variety canned has fat content as high as 32%DM).  Is there any way I can change it?  Should I stop feeding those foods completely, or can I add something to reduce fat?
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by space1101 View Post

I wonder why thrombos or clogged blood vessel happened.  Is it caused by food?  What can we do to prevent it?

space1101 - honestly.... you really need to rerun that test....
It is not as bad as you are thinking..... Something to be taken as a warning? sure, if the test is correct to begin with. Something to freak out about it? no.
Something inconclusive - yes
Because the test was not done properly to begin with.
Before you do anything, for your own peace of mind, go take the test again, otherwise IMHO you are going to make yourself crazy.

IMHO you made good changes.... There are so many advices in this thread...... Changing the meals to the same size..... rotating the meats, leaner meats.... etc.
IMHO, as long as you rotate the proteins, you are fine. Don't just feed the lamb - feed different proteins. I would do all raw and call it the day. But again, that is my opinion.
Now, an opinion that we all seem to share here, is that you should re-do the test after a strict 12hr fasting before drawing any conclusions.....
That level of cholesterol is not going to give you a clot. But HCM will - a symptom is limping. Want to know if your cat has HCM? Run that test I sent the link a number of times.... request it to your vet when you run the cholesterol & triglycerides.... it will tell you.... and you will know if yes or no. And it it would be genetic.
Don't mix anything in the food otherwise you will take it out of balance wink.gif
post #69 of 77

 

Originally Posted by space1101

I see some canned food that Hercules likes also have very hight fat. (like nature's variety canned has fat content as high as 32%DM).  .....

 


Because it should be. Again, cats are not people and need more fat in their diet than we do.

 

You should really stop obsessing over the food and go have the test redone properly. alright.gif

 

AC


Edited by Auntie Crazy - 1/13/12 at 7:09am
post #70 of 77
space1101,
 
 
I would like to share with you this article because it is exceptionally good information. I also hope that, reading it will help you realize you are not dealing with a dire situation and so you will be able to relax and make calm, well-thought out adjustments in your baby's diet for best of health and a healthy weight.
 
Your situation is much better than mine was with a very similar cholesterol level because you don't have to deal with important elevated blood values. Going by the test results you posted it seems that the liver and kidneys are perfectly healthy, functioning normally. This is so very important. And it should help you breathe a huge big sigh of relief and stop worrying.
 
You really need to stop worrying for your own sake and your baby's sake. And this brings me to another subject that is also very important. The stress of vet visits and test procedures. And how stressed cats can become from a long fast - I guess because it so upsets the daily routine and they don't understand. I saw this increased stress in the morning after a night of fasting just very recently when one of my girls had to go in for a dental. I observed her getting more and more stressed and restless, at one point literally by the minute.
 
Why is being stressed important? For one thing, when blood work has to be done, stress can have an effect on the results and produce altered blood values. Among other values cholesterol can also show a basically incorrect, elevated level.
 
There is some good information on this subject in the article below. It's important in many different situations not only when one is dealing with CRF, that's why I'd like to share it with you.
 
 
Please scroll down to Lab Results
and
How Often Should Blood Tests be Done?
 
I really hope that all this will be helpful to you.
 
 
post #71 of 77
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the link.   I really need to know about all the actions of these fatty acids.  Sometimes scientific knowledge would help me understand what to do to protect his arteries and joints.  I've also been researching about when and how much cholesterol level is supposed to rise in a healthy cat, and what would cause clogged arteries or arthritis, but I haven't reached any conclusion yet.   I can't open the second link for some reason.

 

You guys are right, I should relax about this and not stress Hercules.  He probably is confused about the change and believes there was something terribly wrong, and the other two senior cats are probably confused too.   They used to get anything they want at dinner, plus those fatty treats they love, and now they don't because I am too busy calculating their calorie and fat.  

Yes, I'm still dying to know his fasted cholesterol level, but I don't want to stress Hercules so frequently..... 

 

post #72 of 77
This one?
 
Checked on it just now, still works for me on this end. Anyway, since this is very important info I'm anxious for you to have, I put
 
Lab Results
and
How Often Should Blood Tests be Done? 
 
in a PM for you.    
post #73 of 77
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the link, I can see it now.  It also has much useful information about blood test, thanks.

 

Today I also got a massage tool for Hercules from a holistic vet.  I'll see if it works.

post #74 of 77
Thread Starter 

I just want to update Hercules' condition.  His leg doesn't limp any more, he can walk, run, and jump normally like before.   I still don't know what has caused the limp though.  As I recalled, he was walking slowly in January and December, and then one day just started limping when he got up from a nap.  He walked like he was 20 years old.   He started to get better after I reduced his food and stopped adding oil, and now he is well!  I wonder if the problem was caused by too the oil I added.   I really appreciate everyone's help!!

post #75 of 77

space1101, what kind of oil had you been adding to Hercules' food, and how much / how often?

 

I add a small amount to my kitties home-made food, so that could be valuable info for me.

 

I had read on another thread that someone's kitty developed a limp and it turned out to be Mercury poisoning.

It was corrected and he is doing fine on a diet that has less seafood in it.

 

 

 

post #76 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by space1101 View Post

I just want to update Hercules' condition.  His leg doesn't limp any more, he can walk, run, and jump normally like before.   I still don't know what has caused the limp though.  As I recalled, he was walking slowly in January and December, and then one day just started limping when he got up from a nap.  He walked like he was 20 years old.   He started to get better after I reduced his food and stopped adding oil, and now he is well!  I wonder if the problem was caused by too the oil I added.   I really appreciate everyone's help!!

Space, what does your menu look like now, in details?
That is awesome news hun!!! clap.gifclap.gifclap.gifclap.gifclap.gif
post #77 of 77

I have 7 cats, all 7 are rescues.  In May 2013 my 3 1/2 yr old male cat had a limp in which he couldn't jump up on anything.  His blood tests showed cholesterol at 625.  He was also diagnosed with diabetes.  We had to give him 2 insulin shots per day.  I researched and read hundreds of websites on his symptoms.  I changed his food to purina one hairball formula for dry and fancy feast for wet.  He has picked his weight back up from 11.2 to 15 pounds and he is no longer a diabetic cat.  I researched every cat food out there and found that purina one is by far the best dry out there and fancy feast is a great wet.  He no longer limps and can jump up as high as our kitchen counter.  High cholesterol is one of the main reasons for the limp, especially if its the back legs.  The blood gets thick and doesn't make it to the rear legs very easily.  You will know when his cholesterol goes down because the limp will get better and disappear.  Don't expect it to happen overnight, it might take upwards of 2 to 3 months maybe longer.  Go with the food I suggested and the limp will disappear. 

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