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is it ok for my cat to eat wild herbs , honey , oil?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

is that normal when my cat eat rosemary or wild herbs from the garden ? I noticed that he eats wild herbs daily,I'm afraid this is harmful for him

is it ok for cats to eat mint ?

sometimes he drinks some oil , should I prevent him from drinking olive oil or it is beneficial for him ,

when he is ill could I give him honey , one of my friend told me that she gave her cat honey once

 

 

post #2 of 8
Since rosemary extract can be found in so many cat foods, there was a time when I believed rosemary was perfectly safe for cats. Now I'm not so sure any more.
 
Info:
 
 
post #3 of 8
The only one I know the answer to is mint. Catnip is in the mint family, and it is not at all unusual for cats to be attracted to mint! It's not harmful for them. smile.gif
post #4 of 8
Extra Virgin Olive Oil can be used for Hairballs and Constipation in cats, but not on a regular basis/daily for long period of times, as it can cause Vit. A deficiency.


Raw organic honey can be used externally on cats.
Quote:
It's an inverted sugar, which means it is easily absorbed by the body without any of the secretions needed to digest table sugar. This is one of the reasons raw honey is considered the perfect food and has been used for thousands of years.

This is NOT the honey you buy at the grocery store. That honey has been cooked to make the honey sweeter and that removes a lot of the enzymes, proteins and vitamins and minerals that are present in its raw form. Amino acids are also stripped when cooked. As with most health foods, raw and organic is better.

It also contains calcium, iron, zinc, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, copper, chromium, manganese and selenium. As I said before-a multivitamin and mineral supplement

Raw organic honey can be used externally on cats.

This doesn't mean to offer raw honey to your cat as a tonic. This can upset the overall cat diet and is advised against. There is one internal treatment honey is good for when treating cats. Hairballs. If your cat is trying without success to cough up a hairball a small amount of honey may help. It acts as a lubricant and may induce vomiting. The hairball should be expelled at this time2. Other than that, limit the honey to a tiny amount no more than a few times a month1.

The main use for raw honey I'd like to inform everyone of for cats is as an ointment. Asian doctors have known for years of the many skin conditions raw honey can treat. Acne, eczema, rashes and ring worm are a few. Cuts and burns also benefit from substituting raw honey for antibiotic ointments. Again, this should be done with care. I mention it as a first choice mainly because I'm more likely to have it handy than tubes of chemical creams3.

Raw organic honey has been shown to prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria which occurs in wounds. It also acts as a bandage, which means cuts and sores can be covered with it for a period of time. Hydrogen peroxide is generated by the enzymes the bees add to the honey.

What most impressed me is the treatment of burns. While most topical medications dry out the injured area, honey does not. It also doesn't stick to a wound when removing a bandage. Here are instructions on treating a burn with honey.

Since cats are extremely clean and love to lick, an Elizabethan collar may be needed to keep the honey on the skin where it can do some good. I'd also like to stress purchasing raw organic honey as opposed to just raw honey. The organic beekeepers do not use any chemicals so the honey the bees produce is safer. There is a very small chance of contaminated honey from an organic beekeeper.

This is another reason store honey is cooked. It does get rid of the bacteria that may be there when the source of the bees is unknown. The main concern here is botulism.http://www.pictures-of-cats.org/raw-organic-honey-and-cats.html
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post

Since rosemary extract can be found in so many cat foods, there was a time when I believed rosemary was perfectly safe for cats. Now I'm not so sure any more.
 
Info:
 
http://www.thedogpress.com/DogFood/Rosemary-Neurotoxin-10032_Liquorman.asp
 
http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/rosemary-000271.htm

First link is for dogs, not cats, and second is for humans. Be careful about posting links that could scare other members.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minka View Post

First link is for dogs, not cats, and second is for humans. Be careful about posting links that could scare other members.

nono.gif Minka - if you read the first article, beyond the link title..... If you open the page at all even, you will see all over that it is about cats and dogs actually agree.gif
http://www.thedogpress.com/DogFood/Rosemary-Neurotoxin-10032_Liquorman.asp
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina View Post


nono.gif Minka - if you read the first article, beyond the link title..... If you open the page at all even, you will see all over that it is about cats and dogs actually agree.gif
http://www.thedogpress.com/DogFood/Rosemary-Neurotoxin-10032_Liquorman.asp


I had to look at it twice to see the article was about "pet" food in general bigwink.gif Nice article and thanks for posting it.

 

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina View Post

nono.gif Minka - if you read the first article, beyond the link title..... If you open the page at all even, you will see all over that it is about cats and dogs actually agree.gif
http://www.thedogpress.com/DogFood/Rosemary-Neurotoxin-10032_Liquorman.asp

Either way, the website mentions that it is the extract and not the rosemary itself that should be avoided. Also the website is very shoddy; not one I would consult for medical advice..
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