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Our Cat HATES New Kitten! What Can We Do ?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Our normally very well behaved and loved 9 yr old cat HATES our new 10 week old kitten.

The older cat is mostly a indoor cat but also is allowed free range outside when she wants to go. When she is out side she almost always brings us home a "gift" of another animal she has killed, from mice to small rabbits. She is most definitely a hunter.

We have never had any other pets since having her. She is fixed (in case that matters).

We got a 10 week old male kitten Labor Day and she wants to kill it.

She sneaks up on it and does everything she can to get to it and the 1 time she did get to it she went right for its throat. Thankfully I was right there and got her off him with no damage done.

We have had 4 new born (human lol) in our family since we got our older cat and she has never behaved badly to them, so we thought we would be OK with a new born kitten.

What do we do???????
post #2 of 20
Just got the kitten a few days ago? Have you done the proper introduction by keeping the two of them separated for a few days, then scent exchange, then supervised encounters? Your resident cat needs more time to get to know the new kitten and get used to the idea that the kitten isn't going anywhere. Cats are very territorial

http://www.thecatsite.com/Behavior/4...cing-Cats.html

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals...g_new_cat.html

here's a few good link to introduce new cats to old.
post #3 of 20
Of course she hates the new kitten! If you hadn't already mentioned it, I was going to warn you that the new kitten may quickly become another "gift"! Please read the links above. You must always keep new cats apart (regardless of age), until they are well acclimated to the newcomer's scent and presence. Use an indoor kennel, and expect a lot of hissing from your resident "hunter".

I have one of the most docile adult males you can imagine, but when a new cat joined the familiy he quickly became Mr. Hyde. Be careful!
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Truivia View Post
Our normally very well behaved and loved 9 yr old cat HATES our new 10 week old kitten.

The older cat is mostly a indoor cat but also is allowed free range outside when she wants to go. When she is out side she almost always brings us home a "gift" of another animal she has killed, from mice to small rabbits. She is most definitely a hunter.

We have never had any other pets since having her. She is fixed (in case that matters).

We got a 10 week old male kitten Labor Day and she wants to kill it.

She sneaks up on it and does everything she can to get to it and the 1 time she did get to it she went right for its throat. Thankfully I was right there and got her off him with no damage done.

We have had 4 new born (human lol) in our family since we got our older cat and she has never behaved badly to them, so we thought we would be OK with a new born kitten.

What do we do???????
I have a six year DSH named Shadow who is just like your 9 year old cat. Let me start off by saying you can make them tolerate each other but you may never get them to like each other. I have also found that Shadow got better with my DLH Panda and my F3 Savannah Loki as they grew.

Okay first of all Shadow was about four years old when I acquired Panda my DLH. She has extreme medical issues. So she never acted "quite right". So while Panda was little and acted sick Shadow tried to kill Panda twice. I woke up two times to Shadow holding Panda by the throat. Each time Panda seemed dead. However once I got Shadow off her neck she was fine.

So until Panda was large enough to not seem like prey to Shadow they stayed separated. But the real turning point was when Panda did not run and hide from Shadow. Once Panda did not exhibit prey behavior Shadow stopped viewing her as prey.

Now Shadow was about five years old when I acquired my F3 Savannah Loki. The first time she saw him she went right for his throat. However Loki just swatted her in the face and she stopped immediately. She only hissed and growled at him from then on out. With Loki about 3x times longer and twice her height now Shadow leaves him alone. She is actually a bit leery of him. He just runs up and grabs and licks her. But she is not interested in his "love".

Okay so the ways I have found to keep the domestics safe around Shadow is as follows. First and foremost until the kitten is older and larger NEVER leave them together. Second when you allow your adult cat in with your kitten make sure you praise the adult cat first, feed the adult cat first, give treats to the adult first.

So what I am trying to say is this: make the adult cat as happy as possible in the presence of the kitten. Try and keep the adult cats routine the same when near the kitten. If you do make any changes make sure it is for the better of the adult cat when in the presence of the kitten.

Lastly try and make sure for now the adult cat can only have access to the kitten threw a cat carrier or dog crate. Also for what it is worth my Shadow is spayed and always outside hunting like your adult cat as well.

Hope this made sense and if you need any clarification let me know.
post #5 of 20
To be honest without sounding harsh. You shouldn't have got the kitten. Everyone knows how territorial cats are, and mentioning the hunting shows how instinct driven she clearly is. OK, so you can't take the kitten back, although if you had a friend who might like one, I would even go as far as to say, why not let them have it? My reasons for saying this are simply because, your cat is nine, meaning if she lived till average, she would have five years left. Why couldn't you have waited until she died? All you have done is bring a massive amount of stress into her life. After 9 years alone, I doubt she will ever accept a new cat in what she considers, her house, and her stuff. Imagine, if suddenly some teenager moved into your home, and started eating what you consider your food, sitting on your chairs, and sleeping on your bed. And your family were talking to him all the time, giving him your stuff. Would you like it? That's how the cat feels. I'm really sorry to sound like I'm having a go at you, it's just this happens so often, and I always feel like people are being selfish on their original cat, as they know what cats are like. My cat loves people, she is the sweetest most friendly cat, but just the sight of another cat any where near her house and she gets angry. You have put a kitten in a dangerous situation, you won't be able to leave them alone together. I say try and re home the kitten, and wait till your cat dies to get another one... If not, try showering her in treats while the kitten is around and hope she eventually associates the kitten with good things...
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by vcsl1984 View Post
All you have done is bring a massive amount of stress into her life. After 9 years alone, I doubt she will ever accept a new cat in what she considers, her house, and her stuff. Imagine, if suddenly some teenager moved into your home, and started eating what you consider your food, sitting on your chairs, and sleeping on your bed....
Are you KIDDING? "...she'll [never] accept a new cat...?" We appreciate the 'honesty', but since you don't know what you're talking about, you can spare us the 'harshness'. Are you actually claiming to know exactly how their resident cat FEELS!?? Give us all a break. Animals, unlike people, are remarkably adaptive. Experienced cat owners introduce new animals all the time, and done correctly, poses no hardship whatsoever. Do you also feel that all the feline fosters of the world should immediately cease and desist, lest they upset their residents pets?? Consider being thankful that these people have the resources to provide this kitten a permanent home.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Presto View Post
Are you KIDDING? "...she'll [never] accept a new cat...?" We appreciate the 'honesty', but since you don't know what you're talking about, you can spare us the 'harshness'. Are you actually claiming to know exactly how their resident cat FEELS!?? Give us all a break. Animals, unlike people, are remarkably adaptive. Experienced cat owners introduce new animals all the time, and done correctly, poses no hardship whatsoever. Do you also feel that all the feline fosters of the world should immediately cease and desist, lest they upset their residents pets?? Consider being thankful that these people have the resources to provide this kitten a permanent home.
I just have to say this and I hope it comes out okay. Some cats are better off as only cats. It is that simple. While I have always done foster and re-homing of cats that stopped when I decided I was going to keep Shadow. Why you ask, well I feel she would pose to great a risk to a foster animal.

While I have been able to introduce successfully two cats to her it was not easy. It even almost cost Panda the DLH her life I think. So I think for the average person it would be better to keep some cats alone/singularly.

Lastly if you read my whole post it shows you can introduce/add cats if you have an "aggressive" resident cat. BUT IT IS NOT EASY, TAKES TIME AND REQUIRES A GREAT DEAL OF SAFETY CHECKS on the new animal.
post #8 of 20
I agree with cat person. It does take them a while to adapt. I got Tiger when snowy was eight months and i did keep my eye on them and separated them until they felt comfortable. Tiger just ran and hid alot at first but they came around and now they are buds who lick eachother and play. It took them a couple of months until they became friends.
post #9 of 20
I don't want to downplay anything anyone has said here, but I do want to introduce a new dimension to the actions of the older cat.

Cats teach kittens how to "behave" as cats. If the kitten is doing something unmannerly, which often we won't even notice, the older cat WILL rebuke them. You should watch them carefully, of course, but keep in mind the possibility that the older cat is acting as a mother cat would. All cats do this, even in the wild. I would look up some info on mother cat behavior, to see if it might possibly be this.

And, please, people, keep it civil!
post #10 of 20
If we look at felines in nature we see a couple of facts. Infanticide is not practiced by cats, with the exception of male lions. In fact, lions are exceptional in that they represent the only "social" species of cat. They live in prides, while other cat species are solitary. I just can't imagine a female domestic cat practicing infanticide (maybe a male, but I still doubt it).

If a person has the resources and space, and wants to provide for a homeless kitten, then I simply can't get my mind around the theory that "some cats are better off alone". As I stated above, cats can, and will, adapt. Else, according to "vcsl's" theory, people probably shouldn't have more than one child either. I mean sibling rivalries would simply be our specie's undoing!
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta View Post
I don't want to downplay anything anyone has said here, but I do want to introduce a new dimension to the actions of the older cat.

Cats teach kittens how to "behave" as cats. If the kitten is doing something unmannerly, which often we won't even notice, the older cat WILL rebuke them. You should watch them carefully, of course, but keep in mind the possibility that the older cat is acting as a mother cat would. All cats do this, even in the wild. I would look up some info on mother cat behavior, to see if it might possibly be this.

And, please, people, keep it civil!
Quote:
If we look at felines in nature we see a couple of facts. Infanticide is not practiced by cats, with the exception of male lions. In fact, lions are exceptional in that they represent the only "social" species of cat. They live in prides, while other cat species are solitary. I just can't imagine a female domestic cat practicing infanticide (maybe a male, but I still doubt it).

If a person has the resources and space, and wants to provide for a homeless kitten, then I simply can't get my mind around the theory that "some cats are better off alone". As I stated above, cats can, and will, adapt. Else, according to "vcsl's" theory, people probably shouldn't have more than one child either. I mean sibling rivalries would simply be our specie's undoing!
My cat is proof of teaching a younger one is real. He's 2 years old, and really taught my new kitten everything. he taught her not to scratch and where to go to use the bathroom. I saw him punish her for attempting to climb the curtains.

Naturally, he had to accept her first and this did take a good week-2 weeks.

Might not work for all older cats, but it worked for me and thank goodness it did or I'd go crazy!
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Draco View Post
My cat is proof of teaching a younger one is real. He's 2 years old, and really taught my new kitten everything. he taught her not to scratch and where to go to use the bathroom. I saw him punish her for attempting to climb the curtains.

Naturally, he had to accept her first and this did take a good week-2 weeks.

Might not work for all older cats, but it worked for me and thank goodness it did or I'd go crazy!
Thanks! I wasn't sure if I should have posted my opinion on that or not!
post #13 of 20
With cats you always have to have patience. Think of it in terms of dealing with elderly people. Cats are habit driven and hate change. They need to be introduced slowly. Keep them in different rooms for a few days or weeks. Switch out stuff every few days that has their scent and place it in the room with the other cat. Give them a few day then switch the rooms you keeping them in. This will get them used to each others scents. After at least a week maybe two put them in the same room for a short time and see how it goes. Pay plenty of attention to the older cat so he knows he's still the alpha cat. If they hiss at each other just ignore it they will need to work out their own relationship. If all goes well and no fur is flying put them in the same room slowly increasing the amount of time. Make sure the older cat understands that he is the alpha cat which mean paying more attention to him then the newcomer. He'll gradually figure out that the newcomer isn't going anywhere and will be a permanent fixture in the household. When they can be in the same room for awhile start feeding them close together so they come to think of the togetherness with pleasure. Then if that works and they aren't hissing at each other leave them in the same room for a short time with you within hearing distance then try leaving them on their own for a short time if that works. It's a slow gradual process but if you do it right they will get along and may eventually be best buddies. With the kitten being so young I'd keep them away from each other till the kitten is a little bigger. My 13 year old eventually accepted the 3 year old I adopted last Christmas Eve. It took about 2 weeks to get them in the same room without him going balistic and another two weeks for them to get along with mutual toleration. Rasta is friendly with all cats Ricky is not but now Ricky and Rasta are the best of friends and Ricky the older cat is very protective of Rasta when strangers come around. He also accepted another cat I adopted but she got ill and passed away. He missed her a lot.
post #14 of 20
Okay it is normal for most resident cats to except a new cat/kitten with some hissing, growling, and swatting. What I was talking about and I assume the OP is as well is when the resident cat tries to kill the new cat! This is not the same as the resident cat teaching a kitten "rules/proper behavior".

What I was trying to describe is how Shadow the DSH has tried to kill via a bite to the throat or bite to the spine my DLH Panda when she was a kitten. She tried the same behaviors with the F3 Savannah Loki. This is NOT normal and common behavior in domestic cats. But it does sometimes happen and this is again what I thought the OP was speaking about.

But most cats are not like my DSH Shadow. I agree most cats can be introduced to a new kitten or cat without fear of the new cat being seriouslly injured or killed.

Hope that came out clearer. If not I would be glad to clarify.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Person View Post
Okay it is normal for most resident cats to except a new cat/kitten with some hissing, growling, and swatting. What I was talking about and I assume the OP is as well is when the resident cat tries to kill the new cat! This is not the same as the resident cat teaching a kitten "rules/proper behavior".

What I was trying to describe is how Shadow the DSH has tried to kill via a bite to the throat or bite to the spine my DLH Panda when she was a kitten. She tried the same behaviors with the F3 Savannah Loki. This is NOT normal and common behavior in domestic cats. But it does sometimes happen and this is again what I thought the OP was speaking about.

But most cats are not like my DSH Shadow. I agree most cats can be introduced to a new kitten or cat without fear of the new cat being seriouslly injured or killed.

Hope that came out clearer. If not I would be glad to clarify.
No, I TOTALLY agree with you, especially this part...

Lastly if you read my whole post it shows you can introduce/add cats if you have an "aggressive" resident cat. BUT IT IS NOT EASY, TAKES TIME AND REQUIRES A GREAT DEAL OF SAFETY CHECKS on the new animal.

It's all good
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta View Post
No, I TOTALLY agree with you, especially this part...

Lastly if you read my whole post it shows you can introduce/add cats if you have an "aggressive" resident cat. BUT IT IS NOT EASY, TAKES TIME AND REQUIRES A GREAT DEAL OF SAFETY CHECKS on the new animal.

It's all good
I am GLAD it is all GOOD !
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Presto View Post
Are you KIDDING? "...she'll [never] accept a new cat...?" We appreciate the 'honesty', but since you don't know what you're talking about, you can spare us the 'harshness'. Are you actually claiming to know exactly how their resident cat FEELS!?? Give us all a break. Animals, unlike people, are remarkably adaptive. Experienced cat owners introduce new animals all the time, and done correctly, poses no hardship whatsoever. Do you also feel that all the feline fosters of the world should immediately cease and desist, lest they upset their residents pets?? Consider being thankful that these people have the resources to provide this kitten a permanent home.
I agree... it can be done, just takes time and patience. Animals adjust, they will either become best friends or maybe just avoid each other eventually. Generally, an adult cat who has not been around a kitten will be scared of it and attack if it comes at it... they are pretty frisky little things and older cats can be a little off put by the rowdiness at first. Believe me... they usually do fine after proper introductions and a little time. Heck, mind even cuddle with our dogs and rabbit!
post #18 of 20
I agree, for best results, you should separate them and then do a slow introduction with information from the links provided. Pretend the two cats have never met each other before.

And, for the record, I did my introduction completely wrong: I just put the two of them into my living room together as soon as I got them and decided to "let them sort things out" (I was there to watch them the whole time). After the initial hour or so of puffy tail and hissing, they were rolling around on the floor playing, grooming each other, and generally having a good time. But my cats' personalities work well together, and that is something you just get by luck, IMHO. (Even if you try to find a cat at the shelter that you think will get along with your cat, they can be completely different once you take them home!!)

So, it definitely can be done, but it depends on the personalities of your cats. Since you say your older one has a strong prey drive, I would suggest the slow introduction mentioned above.

Good luck, and keep us posted!!
post #19 of 20
I have 6 cats and am still in the process of keeping the last one ( a 1 year old calico, Serenity) separated from the group. Cali (the other calico) and Twig, (the gray tabby) are NOT impressed with her as of yet and will do anything to get to her to fight with her. Hence why she's separated. It's been almost a year now and they still have yet to get along. (She's only allowed to be with Neffie, Rocket and Luna, beacause they are laid back and aren't mean to her.) It's been VERY slow on this end, but we've finally gotten to the not puffy when she's seen stage, so that's a break thru, now on to the next step. It's a long process and takes alot of time, especially if you have Alpha cats like I do that don't like change..But with time and alot of patience you could have two wonderful kitties that love each other, or ones that just tolerate each other. Who knows? It's their call.. Good luck..
post #20 of 20

I have had this problem a few times with my older cat, he is 13 and has been through 2 other kittens in the time I have had him and after time it always turned out fine.  I call Punkin (the older cat) a grumpy old man all the time because he doesn't like small children or small animals.  The first kitten and second turned out the same way, they fight and hiss for the first few days until the kitten tries to snuggle up to him and he will eventually warm up to the point that they are the best of friends.  I have only introduced other males into my home because I wanted the new cat to have the same amount of fight in them that he has, unfortunately for him, both of the other boys ended up being bigger than him and eventually putting him in his place.  I still have my grumpy old man but the other two males went to live on a farm where they can run and hunt because we had to downsize to an apt for a while and punkin has never been outside; now we have room again  and the boys have been separated long enough that they no longer know each other or at least they dont act like they do and the hissing and fighting is way worse than when they were little, they are very happy and well cared for on the farm so I am going to let them stay and I will be picking up my first female in just a few hours.  This is uncharted territory for me I wonder if the male/female mix will be better or worse than the male/male introduction.
 

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