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Cat refuses to eat dry food.

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
Seraphine is approx 6 months old now (have had her since birth) and I cannot get her to eat dry food- she completely refuses to! I feed her 1 can of food a day and she is always starving, but will not go to the food dish to eat (my other cat eats the dry food daily).
She is slightly ribby, and i cannot get any weight on her because she is only eating wet food twice a day.
I got fed up today and decided to grind up some dry food to mix with the wet so she could have more 'wet' food (I cannot afford to give her 3+ cans of wet food a day (which she would love it have).
Why won't she eat the dry food? I checked her teeth out, and there is nothing wrong with them.
Any suggestions??
post #2 of 33
Wesley and Buttercup both prefer their wet food, although they have always eaten their dry when nothing else was available.

If dry food is helpful for your budget and feeding schedule, I'd recommend just trying a different dry food. Just like with wet food, just because they won't eat one particular recipe doesn't mean they won't eat others.

If you bought from Petsmart, Petco, or Walmart, they will take back opened bags of dry food as long as its not almost empty. Just tell them your cat didn't eat it and they'll give you a full refund. Until you can get more calories in em though, really need to bite the bullet and feed more wet, as this is their most important growing stage. BTW, while its still very expensive compared to even premium dry, have you checked out Innova Cat & Kitten 13.2oz cans? At my petsmart they are only $1.75 a can, which makes it the cheapest "good" food they carry.
post #3 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69 View Post
Seraphine is approx 6 months old now (have had her since birth) and I cannot get her to eat dry food- she completely refuses to! I feed her 1 can of food a day and she is always starving, but will not go to the food dish to eat (my other cat eats the dry food daily).
She is slightly ribby, and i cannot get any weight on her because she is only eating wet food twice a day.
I got fed up today and decided to grind up some dry food to mix with the wet so she could have more 'wet' food (I cannot afford to give her 3+ cans of wet food a day (which she would love it have).
Why won't she eat the dry food? I checked her teeth out, and there is nothing wrong with them.
Any suggestions??
Do you realize how lucky you are???

First off, please do not mix dry food with anything wet, whether it be water, milk, canned cat food, etc. Dry food, once wet, becomes "mycotoxin soup" which is not safe for a cat.

What canned food are you feeding or what would you be willing to pay for food each day?

Another thing that you could try is look into raw feeding. Personally, I find it to be much cheaper than commercial cat food, as do a lot of other people. I know, kittens can eat a lot! I have five cats who are one year old, they can still eat lots of food Most of mine are fed a raw diet (if you want more information on that, go to the raw feeding subforum on here, there are several knowledgeable people that can help you). For me, it costs about 1/4 of what I would be paying for canned food, however I do watch sales, and try stick under $2 a pound for meat.
post #4 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by furryfriends50 View Post
First off, please do not mix dry food with anything wet, whether it be water, milk, canned cat food, etc. Dry food, once wet, becomes "mycotoxin soup" which is not safe for a cat.
Completely false information, and wetting dry food is not only commonplace for kittens, but is often recommended right on the back of the bag.

Once wetted, dry food will grow bacteria at the same rate as wet food.
post #5 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducman69 View Post
Completely false information, and wetting dry food is not only commonplace for kittens, but is often recommended right on the back of the bag.

Once wetted, dry food will grow bacteria at the same rate as wet food.
Ducman, I really do not want to get into another debate with you, the information I am posting below is for the original poster of this topic. They can decide what they wish

"Speaking of texture, a common question is "can I just soak the dry food in water?" I hedge more than just a bit at this question. Dry food often has a high bacterial content. Mold is also often found in dry food. There have been many deaths of dogs and cats secondary to eating mold mycotoxins, vomitoxins and aflatoxins which often contaminate the grains found in dry food. If you want to try the trick of wetting down the dry food to alter the texture, please leave it out for only 20-30 minutes then discard it. Bacteria and mold thrive in moisture." -Lisa A. Pierson, DVM (catinfo.org)


"Before you start moistening your cat's dry food to try to replace the missing moisture, you should know about mycotoxins, another potential side effect of the use of grains in cat food. Mycotoxins are naturally occurring fungal by-products that can cause disease and death in dogs and cats. When grains are improperly stored, mycotoxins can develop. Two common forms, both of which have been found in pet food (more commonly in dog food) are aflatoxin and vomitoxin. Although mycotoxins are found worldwide they only become toxic in temperatures above 82 degrees and over 80 percent humidity at which point they interfere with cellular function, and are extremely carcinogenic and immuno-suppressive. The elimination of mycotoxins in food is extremely expensive. Pet food manufacturers are not known for using the highest quality grains available; they would not be able to keep up their high profit margins if they did. The grains most pet food manufacturers use are those that are not fit for human consumption or are by-products from other processes."

- Michelle Bernard, http://www.blakkatz.com/dryfood.html


Dry food is typically considered to be a bad idea for cats for more reasons than just the moisture content. Moisture is a big one, but other issues with dry are the high carb content, it is heavily processed, and the type of protein (plant vs. animal).


Gothicangel69, if you want to do some reading about cat food, I am listing a few good sites to read through if you have the time.

http://catinfo.org/
http://feline-nutrition.org/
http://www.bornfreeusa.org/facts.php?more=1&p=359
http://www.littlebigcat.com/category/nutrition/

There are also two books that I highly recommend. They are "Your Cat: Simple New Secrets to a Longer, Stronger Life" which is written by Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM & "Not Fit for a Dog" which is written by Michael W. Fox, DVM, Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM, and Marion E. Smart, DVM.

Happy reading
post #6 of 33
I hate to derail the OP's thread. . .but I do want to know more about the mycotoxin issue. Whenever I have an old or sick ferret who won't eat, I always grind up their kibble in a coffee grinder and make a mush out of it (because they're so imprinted on kibble that they won't eat anything else, even chicken baby food). This has always worked and they've never gotten sick(er). I would be inclined to do the same for a sick cat. Is the problem only if you leave it out for more than 30 minutes?

To the OP--she shouldn't need 3 cans a day. Maybe 1 1/2 - 2 at her age (an adult cat only needs one can a day, maybe 1 1/2 for a big cat).
post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by furryfriends50 View Post
Ducman, I really do not want to get into another debate with you, the information I am posting below is for the original poster of this topic. They can decide what they wish
Based on accurate information.

Dehydrating food, whether for human or pet consumption, is a time-tested means of preserving food that is inhospitable to bacteria. Rehydrating food is common place for humans (pasta, grits, cereal, rice, you name it), at which point bacteria will begin to grow at a normal rate. On the back of just about any dry food bag, you will see recommendation that the food can be served dry as is, or wetted, as is frequently done for kittens.

Bacteria and mold thrive in moisture, which is why wet and wetted dry food should not be left out, and Lisa Pierson is an anti-kibble crusader who's opinions are not shared by her peers in either the American, Canadian, or British Veterinarian Medical Association. Most mycotoxins are completely harmless, some even beneficial, and while alfatoxin grain contamination exists and can be harmful, you don't hear of it much (of which humans would be consuming far more dehydrated grains than pets) as contamination is rare, typically destroyed in the cooking process, and any further contamination would be subject to immediate recall.

So these half-truth scare tactics do a great disservice to the community IMO.
post #8 of 33
Thread Starter 
Im not too worried about bacteria growing in the food as its completely eaten in about 2.5 seconds (actually, its probably about 3 minutes. She seriously wolfs down her food)
I have tried four different brands of food and she has turned her nose up at all of them. I've tried Go Natural Grain Free as the kibbles are very small so I figured she may like them, Solid Gold, some other grain free type that I cant remember the name of, and the last bag I got was friskies (I know the food sucks, but figured it wouldn't hurt to try as I know most cats love it).
I've tried fish, venison, duck, chicken and she didn't like either one of them.
I doubt I would have the time to make up a balanced raw diet, and the one's already made around here are very expensive (tried the raw diet with an old cat a while ago)
She absolutely LOVES people food though, and will pester me to death trying to get a piece of whatever I had/ going into the garbage to dig out old food/ raiding the sink for leftovers (no idea how that started as I never intentionally give her people food)

All the other kittens in her litter had no problem eating hard kibble, but she's just such a bumhead and wants to be difficult.
post #9 of 33
Ah, well then you've given it a try and I'd just go with the flow and try to find a less expensive but still rich wet food, preferably in 12/13oz cans as it is WAY cheaper, and increase feedings.

It doesn't necessarily have to be a 100% kitten wet food either, a little rich adult food should be fine if it saves some $$$.

Did you ever calculate how many calories are being fed? The can should usually show kcal/can and give a feeding suggestion for kittens.
post #10 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69 View Post
...

She absolutely LOVES people food though, and will pester me to death trying to get a piece of whatever I had/ going into the garbage to dig out old food/ raiding the sink for leftovers (no idea how that started as I never intentionally give her people food)

All the other kittens in her litter had no problem eating hard kibble, but she's just such a bumhead and wants to be difficult.
Given the choice, cats that are not addicted to a particular kibble will often voluntarily choose the healthiest food - or 'people' food.

While you're trying to find a kibble for her, why not give her an evening meal made up of raw pieces of whatever meat you're eating for dinner that night? It may help reduce her extravagant attempts to find this food on her own and it'll be good for her, without requiring that you go the whole raw route. It'll be cheaper than feeding another can, too. (Don't feed it by hand, though - put it in her bowl when you sit down to eat or you'll have a kitty that's begging for scraps the whole time you're cooking!)

Or, speaking of canned, maybe you can give her another canned meal of a less expensive kind than what you're currently feeding?

At six months (I'll bet she's adorable!), she's a growing kitty and needs to eat. I hope you're able to accommodate her tastes soon!

AC

P.S. You mention "other cats" and "all the other kittens in her litter" - did you adopt several siblings together? My Allen, Rachel and Meghan are all siblings, and Spencer and Heather are brother and sister. I love seeing kitty families growing up in the same household!
post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducman69 View Post
Based on accurate information.

Dehydrating food, whether for human or pet consumption, is a time-tested means of preserving food that is inhospitable to bacteria. Rehydrating food is common place for humans (pasta, grits, cereal, rice, you name it), at which point bacteria will begin to grow at a normal rate. On the back of just about any dry food bag, you will see recommendation that the food can be served dry as is, or wetted, as is frequently done for kittens.

Bacteria and mold thrive in moisture, which is why wet and wetted dry food should not be left out, and Lisa Pierson is an anti-kibble crusader who's opinions are not shared by her peers in either the American, Canadian, or British Veterinarian Medical Association. Most mycotoxins are completely harmless, some even beneficial, and while alfatoxin grain contamination exists and can be harmful, you don't hear of it much (of which humans would be consuming far more dehydrated grains than pets) as contamination is rare, typically destroyed in the cooking process, and any further contamination would be subject to immediate recall.

So these half-truth scare tactics do a great disservice to the community IMO.
While I agree that many vets do not agree with Dr. Pierson, there are some that do. Those that do often think outside the box and not within their office. Her 'crusade' as you call it, is based on feeding cats the way they should. According to her, the onus is on the veterinarians who insist on deviating so far from what cats should eat to prove that a dry diet is healthy and species-appropriate. Of the threads I have read involving her, many of her peers misinterpret her ideas as her being arrogant. Her threads, though long, are no where being arrogant; rather, she points out the arrogance of man.who. just for their own convenience, created kibble, a food devoid of the moisture and digestibility a cat requires. Other vets don't agree because she doesn't't provide any scientific evidence. However, I am not sure why she would have to prove an obligate carnivore would need meat. Moreover, I see why you would call her a crusader as her beliefs counter yours.
post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducman69 View Post
Completely false information, and wetting dry food is not only commonplace for kittens, but is often recommended right on the back of the bag.

Once wetted, dry food will grow bacteria at the same rate as wet food.
That is one hundred percent right. I have always fed a mixed diet (commercial wet and commercial dry) and never had any problems with bacteria build up of any kind.

To the OP I would recommend that you just mix a high quality dry food in with the cats wet food. Or you could simply as other posters pointed out get a less expensive brand of canned food.
post #13 of 33
Before you start wetting down kibble, you might want to explore the topic (and not take any particular individual's support of what they feed):

Dr. Hofve, author of LittleBigCat.com and "The Complete Guide to Holistic Cat Care: An Illustrated Handbook" has this to say in her "Cancer Prevention and Treatment" article:

Many pets ingest a host of toxins through their everyday diet. Here are just a few of the potential toxins in commercial pet food:

Acrylamides, trans fats, and other carcinogenic factors used or created during the manufacturing of dry kibble.

Chemicals in food and treat packaging, such as BPA and other plastics.

Bacteria are present on virtually all dry pet foods; some, like Salmonella, produce their own toxins and can make pets very ill.

Contamination with chemical fumigants applied during storage and transportation.

Genetically modified (GMO) ingredients (94% of soy; 70% of corn; 74% of cottonseed oil; 80% of canola oil). GMOs damage the primary detoxification organs (liver and kidneys).

Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are persistent and ubiquitous around the world; they are linked to several human cancers. POPs are found in fish, animal fats, and other animal products used in pet food.

Antibiotics and other drugs are used in livestock, and may persist throughout pet food processing.

Crops condemned for human consumption due to excessive pesticide or fertilizer residue may be used without limit in pet food.

Molds and mold toxins are common contaminants of corn and other grains. At least one of these, Aflatoxin B1, is known to cause liver cancer.

27 categories of “food enhancers” are allowed in pet food, including preservatives, texturizers, colorants, emulsifiers, binders, stabilizers, thickeners, surfactants, and lubricants.

And this to say about the June recall on Purina kibble (Purina recalls dry cat food due to Salmonella):

Now, I just have to say something about this Salmonella-dry food thing. When dry food comes out of the extruder, it is essentially sterile. All bacteria have been killed by the high heat used in processing it. So how does Salmonella get back into the food? The manufacturers considerately spray the dry kibbles with an unsavory mixture of slaughterhouse waste such as animal digests, fats, and liquified by-products. These are not sterile, are often covered with fecal matter, and are therefore very likely to contain a host of bacteria, including of course our pal Salmonella. So, yeah, they are spraying cow poop on your pet’s food.

This is just one more reason to avoid dry food for cats (

read many more reasons here). It isn't just one veterinarian who cautions against kibble and talks about the bacteria it carries, it's many. Pretty much all those who chose to research the topic instead of faithfully (blindly) accepting the pet food companies' marketing seminar spiels, in fact.

And their "crusade" as you call it, is for better health for cats, something all of us want (or should want). If that effort includes talking about the dangers of kibble, then so be it. *shrug*

AC
post #14 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69 View Post
Seraphine is approx 6 months old now (have had her since birth) and I cannot get her to eat dry food- she completely refuses to! I feed her 1 can of food a day and she is always starving, but will not go to the food dish to eat (my other cat eats the dry food daily).
She is slightly ribby, and i cannot get any weight on her because she is only eating wet food twice a day.
I got fed up today and decided to grind up some dry food to mix with the wet so she could have more 'wet' food (I cannot afford to give her 3+ cans of wet food a day (which she would love it have).
Why won't she eat the dry food? I checked her teeth out, and there is nothing wrong with them.
Any suggestions??
You are so lucky!!! Most people struggle to get their cats to eat any wet at all!

Have you checked with a vet to see if she is actually underweight? It's alright on cats to be able to feel their ribs. As long as her spine isn't protruding, she's probably fine. (Almost all cats beg constantly. XP)

If you can't afford any more cans of whatever you are buying, it's alright to buy more junky cans in order to get more food in her, no one will put you down for that. Also, if you can find cheap meat at the store (raw, not the kind for sandwiches), then you can feed her that also.

Seriously, I am jealous! I've got a cat that runs over if anything even sounds like a kibble bag!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducman69 View Post
BTW, while its still very expensive compared to even premium dry, have you checked out Innova Cat & Kitten 13.2oz cans? At my petsmart they are only $1.75 a can, which makes it the cheapest "good" food they carry.
^This is also a great suggestion.
post #15 of 33
Everything negative so far just seems to be about bashing kibble in general, nothing about it being extra-dangerous when moistened. Really, I need to know; anybody have any (scientific, not opinion-based) links to something talking about whether it's bad to moisten kibble, or grind it up and mix it with water to make mush?
post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowy View Post
Everything negative so far just seems to be about bashing kibble in general, nothing about it being extra-dangerous when moistened. Really, I need to know; anybody have any (scientific, not opinion-based) links to something talking about whether it's bad to moisten kibble, or grind it up and mix it with water to make mush?
http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/sho...63&postcount=5
^First two quotes here.

I think the best way to go about this is to go off of your trust in the brand. Do you trust that their kibble will not have bacteria that will be activated when you add water to it?
post #17 of 33
Those don't really address WHY wetting food would be worse. All it says is that temps over 84 degrees and humidity over 80% would activate this toxin. And, to be honest, that's what the weather is here all summer long. So if that's true, my kibble is already contaminated by being in the warehouse before I buy it and in the garage after I buy it. I suppose wetting it after that is no big deal.
post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowy View Post
Those don't really address WHY wetting food would be worse. All it says is that temps over 84 degrees and humidity over 80% would activate this toxin. And, to be honest, that's what the weather is here all summer long. So if that's true, my kibble is already contaminated by being in the warehouse before I buy it and in the garage after I buy it. I suppose wetting it after that is no big deal.
I am sorry, Willowy! I focused on just showing that bacteria is present in kibble because I made an assumption that you were already aware - just about all bacteria grow more rapidly in warm, moist environments (this is why you want to keep wounds dry, your fridge and sink free from standing liquids, etc.). Adding water to anything that has bacteria in it is going to promote the rapid growth of that bacteria; the warmer the temp and the greater the initial bacterial load, the faster that growth.

Does that help explain the warnings?

AC
post #19 of 33
Thread Starter 
Getting the larger cans is a much better idea and should help cut the cost down a bit.

As for the mention of her sisters- I picked up a pregnant stray a while ago and she had four kittens. The other three have been re-homed, but Sera was badly poisoned when she was 5 weeks old and almost died. I couldn't rehome her because I didn't know if the toxins had done any lasting damage.

ps- She LOVES salt and vigegar chips (are these ok to give her as a treat very occasionally)?
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69 View Post
ps- She LOVES salt and vigegar chips (are these ok to give her as a treat very occasionally)?
I'd say no more than 1 or 2 chips a week. Salt and carbs really aren't good for cats though..
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69 View Post
Getting the larger cans is a much better idea and should help cut the cost down a bit.

As for the mention of her sisters- I picked up a pregnant stray a while ago and she had four kittens. The other three have been re-homed, but Sera was badly poisoned when she was 5 weeks old and almost died. I couldn't rehome her because I didn't know if the toxins had done any lasting damage.

ps- She LOVES salt and vigegar chips (are these ok to give her as a treat very occasionally)?
I first want to say that it is GREAT that you choose to keep this cat. Next I want to commend you on your responsible behavior !

I can say as a licensed veterinarian technician that one or two chips a day will not hurt the cat. As long as the cat has a "normal healthy" digestive and GI tract. If your present regain for giving them (potato chips) to your cat is not causing vomiting, diarrhea, or gas keep doing what your doing .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minka View Post
I'd say no more than 1 or 2 chips a week. Salt and carbs really aren't good for cats though..
Yes your correct but let the cat enjoy its life a little maybe ? Plus if the cat is "normal and healthy" a little bit of inappropriate food is just fine as a treat.
post #22 of 33
As long as your kittie is eating the kibble mixed with wet food in a fairly short time interval, I doubt it will do any harm.

I've been around here for a long time and often a simple food question gets all tangled up in how bad this food is or that food is when honestly, our cats will survive just fine. Yes, we should feed the best quality food, but some of us cannot afford the prices so we just need to read labels and feed our cats the best we can. It's still better for a cat to be in a loving home with "decent" food than in a shelter living in a cage with whatever food has been donated to the shelter or being euthanized.

Some posters over the years have quoted Dr. Lisa Pierson. Well, she is just one veterinarian who has her own ideas just as we all do. She is not a food God and has her own agenda just as others do. It's best to just use a bit of common sense and do the best you can for your cat. As long as you are not abusing your cat and feeding the best you can afford, keeping their litter clean, giving them exercise and lots of love, and getting them veterinarian treatment when and if required, you are doing fine.
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
As long as your kittie is eating the kibble mixed with wet food in a fairly short time interval, I doubt it will do any harm.

I've been around here for a long time and often a simple food question gets all tangled up in how bad this food is or that food is when honestly, our cats will survive just fine. Yes, we should feed the best quality food, but some of us cannot afford the prices so we just need to read labels and feed our cats the best we can. It's still better for a cat to be in a loving home with "decent" food than in a shelter living in a cage with whatever food has been donated to the shelter or being euthanized.

Some posters over the years have quoted Dr. Lisa Pierson. Well, she is just one veterinarian who has her own ideas just as we all do. She is not a food God and has her own agenda just as others do. It's best to just use a bit of common sense and do the best you can for your cat. As long as you are not abusing your cat and feeding the best you can afford, keeping their litter clean, giving them exercise and lots of love, and getting them veterinarian treatment when and if required, you are doing fine.
Very very good work ! I know your the moderator but I just have to say I agree with you one hundred percent . Hope you do not mind back up from us "little people" .
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Crazy View Post
Bacteria are present on virtually all dry pet foods; some, like Salmonella, produce their own toxins and can make pets very ill.
And yet "certain individuals" will in the same breath assure you that regular consumption of salmonella bacteria, which the FDA says is present in about 5-20% of raw poultry at any given time and primary reason the American, Canadian, and British Veterinarian Medial Association advises against a raw-diet, is perfectly healthy. So its fine when its absolutely expected to be in raw, but dangerous when there is an off chance it could make it to consumers in dry and not be recalled as we've seen in the past for salmonella contamination.

And they wonder why its cautioned to double-check the "facts" presented by kibble-crusaders to ensure they aren't half-truth scare tactics.
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducman69 View Post
And yet "certain individuals" will in the same breath assure you that regular consumption of salmonella bacteria, which the FDA says is present in about 5-20% of raw poultry at any given time and primary reason the American, Canadian, and British Veterinarian Medial Association advises against a raw-diet, is perfectly healthy. So its fine when its absolutely expected to be in raw, but dangerous when there is an off chance it could make it to consumers in dry and not be recalled as we've seen in the past for salmonella contamination.

And they wonder why its cautioned to double-check the "facts" presented by kibble-crusaders to ensure they aren't half-truth scare tactics.
LOL!!!!!!!!

Cats ARE naturally resistant to Salmonella but who in their right mind deliberately encourages bacterial growth and then feeds it to their cat?! How many might do so if they're unaware the bacteria are present?

Although calling people names is generally considered rude (and we've had this discussion before) I think it's hysterical you keep calling me a kibble crusader. My dear Ducman, I'm all about education and if I'm on any crusade at all, it's to give people as much info in as much depth as I can. You can mock me and follow me around and harass me to your heart's content... it won't keep me from answering cat owners' questions and offering as much help as I possibly can. I've seen with my own eyes the change in vitality when a cat's diet is improved and I've heard with my own ears the tears shed by owners who've called to thank me after their cat's IBD, UTI, diarrhea and/or vomiting completely disappeared.

Nothing you say or do can stack up against what I've seen and learned.

There are veterinarians all across American who've witnessed the same improvements, and more are looking beyond the PFI marketing seminars and ignoring the lucrative product selling kickbacks to see the truth every day. IBD, urinary tract issues, diabetes, obesity, pancreatitis, kidney disease - 70-80 years ago (before kibble), they didn't exist; today, they're all at near epidemic proportions. This isn't normal! And it's entirely preventable.

AC
post #26 of 33
post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
As long as your kittie is eating the kibble mixed with wet food in a fairly short time interval, I doubt it will do any harm.

I've been around here for a long time and often a simple food question gets all tangled up in how bad this food is or that food is when honestly, our cats will survive just fine. Yes, we should feed the best quality food, but some of us cannot afford the prices so we just need to read labels and feed our cats the best we can. It's still better for a cat to be in a loving home with "decent" food than in a shelter living in a cage with whatever food has been donated to the shelter or being euthanized.

Some posters over the years have quoted Dr. Lisa Pierson. Well, she is just one veterinarian who has her own ideas just as we all do. She is not a food God and has her own agenda just as others do. It's best to just use a bit of common sense and do the best you can for your cat. As long as you are not abusing your cat and feeding the best you can afford, keeping their litter clean, giving them exercise and lots of love, and getting them veterinarian treatment when and if required, you are doing fine.
And some have expressed negative opinions about Dr. Pierson....not sure what the point of your statement is. people express support for Barracks Obama as well as opposition. There will always be pro and anti sides. Yes she is only one veterinarian but Martin Luther King was only one man and he changed a whole lot? I know he and Obama have nothing to do with pet food but it doesn't mean Dr. Pierson's opinion means nothing. Having said that, Info understand why people oppose her views. The only way to really make good decision is to evaluate both sides. I am not a Pierson 'crusader' but I do believe that cats should eat canned or raw like Dr. Pierson does. However, I also realize that people have their own opinions, comfort level, finances, etc.
post #28 of 33

The topic of this thread is "Cat refuses to eat dry food". Please return to the topic, as otherwise posts will be edited/deleted and the thread closed.

post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Person View Post
I can say as a licensed veterinarian technician that one or two chips a day will not hurt the cat. As long as the cat has a "normal healthy" digestive and GI tract. If your present regain for giving them (potato chips) to your cat is not causing vomiting, diarrhea, or gas keep doing what your doing .

Yes your correct but let the cat enjoy its life a little maybe ?
(Note to admin: I am re-responding to a question the OP asked: Is it okay to feed salt and vinegar chips?)

[bold added by me]
These are the kind of things said by people who can't stop overfeeding their pets though.
"S/he looks at me like she's so sad."
"What's the use of being healthy if you aren't happy?"
"I love her/him so I'm going to give her a great life by giving her everything she wants!"

These are the kinds of things my grandma and numerous other people with fats pets say. They think that if their animal doesn't get food whenever they want, if the pet doesn't get their treats of ice cream and cookies, that their pet will be sad their whole life and that they will feel unloved. But that is simply not true. Cats live in the 'now', they won't be sad forever if you don't give them a treat. They won't be suffering if you don't fill their bowl to the brim.
Sure the chips will make her happy this second, but it won't make her happy in the long run. Just like for every plate of deep fried onion rings and hotdogs you eat, you increase the chance of clogged arteries and cancer, for every non-carnivorous treat you give your cat, their risks of disease go up.
Point is, sure it is fine to give her a couple of treats a week, but keep in mind that you are giving her unhealthy food and it needs to be cut to a minimum to maximize healthy years.


(P.s. I am in no way calling anyone's pets fat, I'm just saying that this type of thinking is what leads pets to becoming fat. The thought that love = food.)
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minka View Post
(Note to admin: I am re-responding to a question the OP asked: Is it okay to feed salt and vinegar chips?)

[bold added by me]
These are the kind of things said by people who can't stop overfeeding their pets though.
"S/he looks at me like she's so sad."
"What's the use of being healthy if you aren't happy?"
"I love her/him so I'm going to give her a great life by giving her everything she wants!"

These are the kinds of things my grandma and numerous other people with fats pets say. They think that if their animal doesn't get food whenever they want, if the pet doesn't get their treats of ice cream and cookies, that their pet will be sad their whole life and that they will feel unloved. But that is simply not true. Cats live in the 'now', they won't be sad forever if you don't give them a treat. They won't be suffering if you don't fill their bowl to the brim.
Sure the chips will make her happy this second, but it won't make her happy in the long run. Just like for every plate of deep fried onion rings and hotdogs you eat, you increase the chance of clogged arteries and cancer, for every non-carnivorous treat you give your cat, their risks of disease go up.
Point is, sure it is fine to give her a couple of treats a week, but keep in mind that you are giving her unhealthy food and it needs to be cut to a minimum to maximize healthy years.


(P.s. I am in no way calling anyone's pets fat, I'm just saying that this type of thinking is what leads pets to becoming fat. The thought that love = food.)
I'm going to quickly respond to this post and then ask that we all get back on track re the OP's question.

Little Mika loves potato chips and cheesies. She gets a couple of these treats about once a week. Mika is a tiny, slim little girl who has certainly got no weight issues. Bijou, on the other hand, is her full brother and he is big and he does not get those treats. My hubby did feed him human food when we were together. Since we parted, I've taken all dry food away from him and he has successfully lost almost 4 pounds.

Some people will gain weight eating potato chips and such things, but others won't so we can't paint everything and everyone with the big wide paint brush. What works for one doesn't work for another so let's keep that in mind when handing out information and "facts".
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