or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Could my cat be an Egyptian Mau?

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Hi, this is my first post and I hope I am writing this in the correct forum!

Just over a year ago I got a 12 week old kitten from a friend-of-a-friend whose cat had a litter.
He is very playful and intelligent, and he just worships me (his owner) he would do anything for me. My vet thought he looked like a Bengal but after doing some research myself I came across this breed the Egyptian Mau and I cannot help but think my boy has the same qualities. However I am under the understanding that he is a regular moggy but I have never seen a moggy look so distinctive and unusual before.

Anyway, here are some photos for you to look at. Now he is 18 months old.





post #2 of 30
No - not even close. He's a handsome brown spotted tabby & white domestic shorthair.

Tabby markings come in 4 types:

1. Classic - swirled/bullseye markings on the side.
2. Mackerel - vertical stripes on the side.
3. Spotted - spots on the side.
4. Ticked - like an Abyssinian.

Your cat is spotted but its not a Mau or a Bengal.
post #3 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your response! I had never seen a spotted tabby before, and even his personality matches that of the Mau.
post #4 of 30
I seem to be getting a lot of emails lately asking if their particular cat is a Mau. Wonder if the Mau breed is getting more recognizable. I show and breed them and my website pops up in searches I guess.

Most spotted purebred cats were developed/bred from naturally spotted domestic cats in the past. Their other characteristics were selectively bred for as well. So therefore, there will be spotting and other characteristics that can come up randomly in the domestic cat population. The difference is that purebred cats will pass these traits on to their offspring, while domestics have a wide range of characteristics that that they will produce. This is why you'll find long and short hair, and many different colour/pattern kittens in one litter.

Unless you know the parents, or can find a tattoo or microchip, there really is no way to tell if a cat is pure bred or not.

I do have to agre, that spotting in domestic cats is quite rare and very striking to look at. I have only seen a few in my life.
post #5 of 30
He is a stunning beauty! Congrats!

If he has good psyche, as it seems, you perhaps want to show him in the Pet class at Cat Exhibitions?

Such spots arent common in moggies.
Altthough I DID saw almostsuch a one, in my neighbours garden! I presume some of our neigbours a little futher away has such a one. Or they got visit of some friend with hers cat.


Good luck!
post #6 of 30
Definitely not a purebred cat (because of the white, for example), but I do think there's some Bengal in him. I may be wrong, but to me those spots have a rosette'ish' look to them which shouldn't be found in a regular moggy without there being some rosetted cats in his lines. Technically he is a moggy, but I do think there is some breed mixed in him.

He's very handsome whatever he is.
post #7 of 30
Just so you know - spotted tabbies do pop up in the general population - not common but they do.

Friends of mine have a house on part of the farm property. There was a cute kitten (maybe 5-6 months old) that came up to me when I was in the car. I was petting her and noticed she was 1/2 mackerel and 1/2 spotted tabby (which could be called "broken mackerel" to be technical). But the spots were more like and Ocicat pattern spots. Only problem is the cat was a blue-cream tabby and that color is not in the Ocicat gene pool.

And I'm the only one in the area with Ocicats and mine are neutered But some people may say "oh she's part Oci", but she was not.
post #8 of 30
He is a beautiful cat
post #9 of 30
I found a stray kitten (about 6 mo old) once a long time ago who looked like an Egyptian Mau... I called her a Mau mix although she was probably just a DSH she looked quite a bit like one. I don't have any photos unfortunately. She was a silver spotted tabby, although darker silver than the Maus you usually see.
She looked a LOT like this Mau kitten:
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
Just so you know - spotted tabbies do pop up in the general population - not common but they do.
If this was a reply to my suggestion that there might be bengal in him: Yes, I'm very well aware that spotted tabbies are normal (and are actually quite common around here), but cats with rosettes are not (unless you have asian leopard cats or mixes in the population).
The kitty in the pic doesn't have a flashy show bengal pattern and excellent contrast, but I see something else than broken mackerel or regular spots. (But I'm actually having an infected eye at the moment so I might be seeing things..).
post #11 of 30
I see just solid spots on my screen....lol - the comment was to the OP just information for her.
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernGlow View Post
but cats with rosettes are not
The spots aren't perfectly round, sort of arrow head shaped however I believe rosettes have different shades in/around each spot.
post #13 of 30
Hi there,
I don't post here much but I have to reply to this one.
Definately part bengal...gotta be at least 50%...or even more.
The horizontal flow of the spotting is a dead give away and I don't see any trace of a bullseye pattern.
Seriously, the flow of her spots is more bengal than my the flow of spots on my full bengal.
Very pretty
post #14 of 30
The flow of the spots have nothing to do with whether or not this cat is part Bengal or part Mau. The Mau is a randomly spotted breed, and for that reason, you can find Maus with wide-open horizontal flowing patterns like the cat in this thread. Check out some of the cats here, especially the RW at the top of the page.
http://www.egyptianmau.org/stars/gra...ands97_98.html

We also have crowded and busy patterns. . . patterns with vertical flows. . . swirling patterns with whirlpool flows. . . all are equally correct and equally Egyptian Mau. Then you get to the issue of spots, which can be any size or shape.

I'm not saying the cat in question is part Mau. Unless the owner has papers on a him, we'll never know for certain. However, the Mau is a very rare breed in the UK and their foundation lines do not resemble the cat is question. My foundation girl is out of the UK foundation cattery's line, so I hope I should know. He's still a very handsome guy! I bet he draws a lot of attention from the neighbors
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by FerrisCat View Post
The flow of the spots have nothing to do with whether or not this cat is part Bengal or part Mau. The Mau is a randomly spotted breed, and for that reason, you can find Maus with wide-open horizontal flowing patterns like the cat in this thread. Check out some of the cats here, especially the RW at the top of the page.
http://www.egyptianmau.org/stars/gra...ands97_98.html

We also have crowded and busy patterns. . . patterns with vertical flows. . . swirling patterns with whirlpool flows. . . all are equally correct and equally Egyptian Mau. Then you get to the issue of spots, which can be any size or shape.

I'm not saying the cat in question is part Mau. Unless the owner has papers on a him, we'll never know for certain. However, the Mau is a very rare breed in the UK and their foundation lines do not resemble the cat is question. My foundation girl is out of the UK foundation cattery's line, so I hope I should know. He's still a very handsome guy! I bet he draws a lot of attention from the neighbors
Interesting. I quickly ruled out Egyptian Mau because of my lack of knowledge about them. I always thought that they had small, close together spots. If what you are saying is true, I guess this cat could be part Egyptian Mau.

I know that bengal breeders have put in a lot of time and effort, trying to eliminate a "domestic pattern flow" in bengals. This website illustrates what I mean (http://www.akerrsbengals.com/commonterms.htm). Knowing that, I ruled out the possibility that the OP's cat is just a regular cat or moggie...I think people in the UK call it. You know what I mean...lol.

Honestly, she still looks like a bengal to me. Obviously, not full bengal. BTW, I've seen a lot of bengals. I'm obsessed...lol.

Can I have permission to post a link to your pic on a bengal forum? I'd like to hear what people there have to say. Let me know.
Thanks
post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauraetco View Post
Interesting. I quickly ruled out Egyptian Mau because of my lack of knowledge about them. I always thought that they had small, close together spots. If what you are saying is true, I guess this cat could be part Egyptian Mau.
Many breeders prefer the tighter, busy patterns with small, close together spots. However, this is a preference and not at all directly addressed in our standard. For more clarification and some excellent visual aids, please take a look at pages 82-96 in the breed presentation that our breed council secretary gave at CFA's most recent annual meeting.

Quote:
I know that bengal breeders have put in a lot of time and effort, trying to eliminate a "domestic pattern flow" in bengals. This website illustrates what I mean (http://www.akerrsbengals.com/commonterms.htm). Knowing that, I ruled out the possibility that the OP's cat is just a regular cat or moggie...I think people in the UK call it. You know what I mean...lol.
Thank you for sharing the link!

Many Egyptian Maus and Bengals share a common ancestor with Millwood Tashi/Tory of Dehli, the foundation domestic used by Jean Mill when she established the Bengal breed. Other Egyptian Mau lines have been used to bring in specific traits to the Bengal breed. We have a Bengal breeder on this board who would be able to provide far more information on the connection than I could!
post #17 of 30

Hello all,

 

I was going to start a thread, but then I saw that one already existed for my question. I adopted a 7mth old cat. I thought he was just a DSH, but I was told by a veterinarian that he may have a little Egyptian Mau in him, due to his experience and with the spotting and characteristics my cat shows. It seems that there are some people on the this thread that are well informed and are EM breeders themselves. I'll see if I can get a good photo of him on here. I researched personalities of EMs, and he fits it exactly, but I'm just more curious than anything about it.
 

Thank you so much!

400

400

 I'll try to get a better one of his back up. It has spots that are exactly in line with eachother.

Thank you again

post #18 of 30
Vets, unless breeders or involved in cat shows know extremely little about cat breeds

Your cat is a lovely brown tabby & white domestic, not a Mau

Tabby patterns come in mackerel, classic, ticked and spotted
post #19 of 30

thank you :)
 

post #20 of 30

The rescue I got him from had also said that the people they got him from had papers, showing some sort of ancestry, but I never got them. I don't know a lot about breeds, but know a little bit and definitely questioned it when I heard he may have Mau in him. He does have the ticked fur too and it's very gorgeous. Thank you again. :)

 

post #21 of 30

If he had papers then either they were fake or he isn't a Mau, as Maus never, ever have white markings.  Papers for a cross-bred would be highly unusual, at least in the UK, unless it was a deliberate out-cross for a breeding program.

post #22 of 30

All the cats pictured here look and act so much like my Seamus.  They all have delicate features (for male cats), beautiful green eyes and an attitude that comes across in the pictures.  Your cat is beautiful!

post #23 of 30

Hi there!

I'm so glad I found this thread because I always though my boy had Egyptian Maun characteristics. This pic is ever since he was 4 months old.

He was a stray and I adopted him from a shelter, I don't actualy care for breeds and such, I just know he's gorgeous!  

post #24 of 30

That's an extremely adorable picture but not really the best one to see much of the cat.   We can see he has cute spots on his belly (which is common in many tabby cats.)  

 I can't totally see the arrangement of spots on his sides.   .. but looks like it MIGHT be more arranged in broken vertical stripes rather than the more random pattern that is more common in the Egyptian Mau.   

 

 He truly is probably not an Egyptian Mau ,  but a very handsome Brown Spotted Tabby Domestic Shorthair ---  which would not make him any  less special.   and I'm sure you agree! 

 

It would be extremely unlikely to find an Egyptian Mau kitten at a shelter.     Even finding an adult Mau in a shelter would be quite uncommon... But the odds are even more against a 3 or 4 month old kitten ending up at a shelter  

  A breeder is certainly not likely to dump a young kitten (And even if it's a breeder who is just in it  for money, why would they dump a kitten instead of selling him?),  and someone who just spent at least $600 for the kitten is not likely to turn around in a month or so and leave him at a shelter or dump him on the street.    Most 4 month old EMs are not going to be outside unless on leash or in a very secure outdoor cat enclosure. So  to have been  a stray,  he'd have to have somehow have escaped and got lost soon after going to a new home ( or got lost from the breeder's home)  and then was never found.   & usually  one of the first steps would be to check shelters.  And apparently he had no microchip.    

 

 I often use the comparison that an Egyptian Mau is much more rare than a  hairless Sphynx .   And how many Sphynx kittens  are there running around as strays or in shelters?     At least I sure don't see many!  In fact I have never seen one.   I've seen a few adult Sphynx pictured on shelter websites.  but not kittens.   And surely the numbers of lost  / abandoned Egyptian Mau kitttens must be much much lower.     

 

But sometimes cats can resemble a breed without actually being related.  especially when it's not a super extreme looking breed .   

Like the vast majority of cats, he's probably mostly from ancestors who came from the same part of the world where he was found. .   ( Of course, if you got him in Egypt,  then he could be considered like a "native Mau".    ) 

post #25 of 30

Did someone say Mau...........:bigwink:

post #26 of 30
I got my little boy off the streets when he was only three weeks old. Just recently I started researching what kind of cat he could be. He has the weirdest personality that matches that of the Egyptian mau and looks just like it. Help me clarify!
[IMG]
post #27 of 30

Hi Laneybug welcome to TCS what a handsome boy :heart4:   I don't think he is a E Mau, but he is a beautiful silver and black DSH Tabby. :).

post #28 of 30
my bronze Egyptian mau, I identified him by googling websites
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziegfeldgirl27 View Post

Hi, this is my first post and I hope I am writing this in the correct forum!


Just over a year ago I got a 12 week old kitten from a friend-of-a-friend whose cat had a litter.

He is very playful and intelligent, and he just worships me (his owner) he would do anything for me. My vet thought he looked like a Bengal but after doing some research myself I came across this breed the Egyptian Mau and I cannot help but think my boy has the same qualities. However I am under the understanding that he is a regular moggy but I have never seen a moggy look so distinctive and unusual before.


Anyway, here are some photos for you to look at. Now he is 18 months old.










too much white on him, but he is lovely
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by alicatrescue View Post

my bronze Egyptian mau, I identified him by googling websites

I am afraid you cannot identify a cat by comparing looks from a website. Unless you have papers or some proof of parentage he cannot be called any particular breed. But it does not matter - he is a handsome little Domestic Shorthair Tabby with his own unique personality.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home