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Cat vomits every day

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I have a friend whose cat vomits every day, sometimes 2x a day. When I heard this I told her that's not normal but she said that he just had a physical exam and he is perfectly healthy. They did an x-ray and they said that he had no foreign objects inside. I told her that it must be his food if this has been happening for a very long time and he only vomits food. She said she gives him premium food that the vet recommended ever since he was a kitten (he is 4 now). He eats ProPlan dry food. After checking that food it has a very very bad reputation and the ingredients are bad. I told her that. I also told her that dry food is not really good that perhaps she should try some other food and maybe she should switch him to wet food. Well, she said that dry food is good for his teeth so why should she switch? I told her that was BS but she said the vet told her that. So then I sent her some articles explaining wet vs dry. After reading she bought him some canned food (I recommended Wellness as it is better than other brands which can be picked up at Petco). He did not vomit on that for a week but she stated that he won't eat it once he puts the can in the fridge so she needs to throw it out and that is seems like he is starving himself instead of eating it. So I told her that she should probably slowly switch his food until he gets used to the wet food instead of doing a drastic change to his diet. Well so she gave him the dry food again and he vomited. She called the vet told her that the cat vomits every day and she wants to do something about it. The doctor recommended an ultrasound. The ultrasound showed irritated intestines and stomach. The doctor recommended Dry food Purina Vet Diet EN. I checked that food for my friend and again I looked at the ingredients. They are all crap. There is nothing nutritious in that food. I told my friend to ask the vet what specifically is in that food that will make her cat better. I told my friend that dry food is not really what cats eat and they need meat and not grain, veggies which are just fillers. I told her that cats in the wild do not eat grains. She told her vet what I told her but the vet said that she understood my point but that cats today don't live in the wild, they are groomed to live indoors and don't require the raw protein and that my friend should be feeding her cat whatever he likes. Right now he is really hooked on the vet food and he just want to eat that. I think they put something into that food to make the cat hooked on. I told my friend that her vet is an IDIOT and she should probably find a different vet.
I personally feed my cats wet (HealthyPetNet). I gave my friend some of that but she is not convinced. She said the vet told her that she feeds dry her own cat and it has no problems.
What do you guys think about all of this? I want to help my friend and her cat.

Thank you

Maggie
post #2 of 20
The reason the cat like the dry food better is because companies coat their dry food in delicious tasting, no nutrient stuff, so cats go bananas for it even if they don't get their nutritents they need.
post #3 of 20
I would ask for a complete blood workup. I would also consider a different vet for not suggesting this.

Several years ago my Dusty was also throwing up several times a day. As it was the time of year she normally sheds, I thought it was excessive hair balls. So the barfing finally stopped, but she had lost weight, and a significant amount down to 6 lbs from 8 lbs. Then I noticed she was drinking a lot and peeing a lot. Finally I took her to the vet, where he suggested a blood panel and a kidney ultrasound. The ultrasound didn't show much unusual, but the blood work indicated that she had CRF. CRF is quite common in cats, and you can either choose to treat it or not depending upon the personality and temperament of your cat. Cats have been known to live to well into their teens with CRF. My kitty is now 9 and I am opting not to treat her. I believe that the quality of her life is more important than how long she lives, and I don't want to torture her with treatment and cause her to become afraid of me.

Good luck with your friend's kitty.
post #4 of 20
I would probably get a second opinion - but, if that vet also recommended a prescription food, I would try it and not blow it off because the ingredients did not look good to my layman's eyes. It's medicine, pure and simple.

My boy had struvite crystals. He's on Hills CD wet and dry (a prescription food). Knock wood, he's been very healthy on this diet and he's vet checked twice a year (senior panels, the works). Do the ingredients look good to me? not so much - based on what I've learned on the internet (and that's a discussion in and of itself - just because we read it on the internet, does not mean there's any science behind the argument). Does the food work - well, yes it does, at least for the last two years.

My boy was adopted as an adult and sort of likes the wet, but really likes the dry. Given that, the vet prescribed wet and dry food. Sometimes whatever type of food, wet or dry, was given to a kitten, remains in the cat's mind as 'food', and nothing else will do.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darlili View Post
I would probably get a second opinion - but, if that vet also recommended a prescription food, I would try it and not blow it off because the ingredients did not look good to my layman's eyes. It's medicine, pure and simple.

My boy had struvite crystals. He's on Hills CD wet and dry (a prescription food). Knock wood, he's been very healthy on this diet and he's vet checked twice a year (senior panels, the works). Do the ingredients look good to me? not so much - based on what I've learned on the internet (and that's a discussion in and of itself - just because we read it on the internet, does not mean there's any science behind the argument). Does the food work - well, yes it does, at least for the last two years.

My boy was adopted as an adult and sort of likes the wet, but really likes the dry. Given that, the vet prescribed wet and dry food. Sometimes whatever type of food, wet or dry, was given to a kitten, remains in the cat's mind as 'food', and nothing else will do.
I am sorry but I think a layman can figure out that that these ingredients are not good:
Soy protein isolate, poultry by-product meal, corn gluten meal, soy flakes, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), corn starch, natural flavor, calcium carbonate, phosphoric acid, potassium chloride, fish oil, DL-Methionine, taurine, choline chloride, powdered cellulose, zinc proteinate, salt, dried colostrum, Vitamin E supplement, manganese proteinate, ferrous sulfate, copper proteinate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite. E-4584

THERE IS NO MEDICINE IN IT.
I wouldn't want to give this to a healthy cat nevermind a sick cat.

I really think she needs to get another vet.
I appreciate your input.
post #6 of 20
I think what the previous poster meant when it was stated "Its medicine" (and please correct me if I'm wrong) is not that its actual medicine, but that its a formula developed specifically for cats with certain needs.

I agree with getting a second opinion, but I also agree that if the 2nd vet recommends a prescription diet, then please don't shun it because you don't like the ingredients. I have a boy on prescription food, and at first glance, I don't think the ingredients look good either. But the fact is, he was sick before starting this food, and he's been as healthy as can be since he's started eating it. What looks bad to me, is obviously exactly what his body needs to keep him healthy. The fact is - some cats thrive on the "bad" food sold at Walmart, while others thrive on top of the line food, and others thrive on raw diets. Every cat is different, and every cat has different needs. Prescription foods are prescription foods for a reason. I definitely think your friend needs to get a second opinion, but please DON'T convince her to stop a prescription diet if the second vet recommends it. I've seen cats that eat prescription food get worse if they stop the food. Your friends cat may not need a prescription diet, but the fact is, you're not a vet (at least I don't think you are). Are there bad vets out there? Absolutely. Which is why a second opinion is always a good thing to get. But many, many vets DO know what they are talking about, so please don't go against what the vet says just because your opinion is that the food is bad.

I really hope your friend's kitty is ok. Hopefully a second opinion will get to the bottom of this.
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooklet425 View Post
I think what the previous poster meant when it was stated "Its medicine" (and please correct me if I'm wrong) is not that its actual medicine, but that its a formula developed specifically for cats with certain needs.

I agree with getting a second opinion, but I also agree that if the 2nd vet recommends a prescription diet, then please don't shun it because you don't like the ingredients. I have a boy on prescription food, and at first glance, I don't think the ingredients look good either. But the fact is, he was sick before starting this food, and he's been as healthy as can be since he's started eating it. What looks bad to me, is obviously exactly what his body needs to keep him healthy. The fact is - some cats thrive on the "bad" food sold at Walmart, while others thrive on top of the line food, and others thrive on raw diets. Every cat is different, and every cat has different needs. Prescription foods are prescription foods for a reason. I definitely think your friend needs to get a second opinion, but please DON'T convince her to stop a prescription diet if the second vet recommends it. I've seen cats that eat prescription food get worse if they stop the food. Your friends cat may not need a prescription diet, but the fact is, you're not a vet (at least I don't think you are). Are there bad vets out there? Absolutely. Which is why a second opinion is always a good thing to get. But many, many vets DO know what they are talking about, so please don't go against what the vet says just because your opinion is that the food is bad.

I really hope your friend's kitty is ok. Hopefully a second opinion will get to the bottom of this.
Thanks. I didn't tell my friend to stop the food the vet prescribed. I told her to have him on it until her cat improves. My concern is that the vet didn't tell her to ever stop that food. I believe that feeding her cat quality food and not ProPlan loaded with crap from the kitten would have prevented him from being where he is now.
I seriously think that dry cat food is bad for cats. It's probably OK to give it to the cat once in a while in a small portion maybe as a snack but not as a main staple every day. There is no perfect food out there. They all have something undesirable but some are worse than others.
post #8 of 20
Thank you - I expressed myself badly, but I indeed meant prescription food is just that - a specially developed food to treat a specific medical condition - so in a way it is medicine, helping to treat a condition just like Baytril would treat an infection.

Truly, if more than one vet suggests a prescription food, especially after full blood work, etc., is conducted, it is only prudent to try that food. Vets may not be certified feline nutritionists (well, not many people are), but they are people who've had years of training, and years of experience, in treating sick animals. If more than one is suggesting a certain course of treatment, it might be wise to consider it.

Also, I wouldn't stop feeding a prescription food without consultation with the treating vet - some conditions need the prescription food to be fed as a maintenance diet (e.g., cats prone to crystals) - others may not. It's sort of like stopping antibiotics when you feel better, but before the prescription runs out...the rebound effect may be worse than the original condition.
post #9 of 20
While, Pro plan is definately not my definition of good food , many, many millions of cats do well on it ... Also, many millions live to their 20's on dry food ( IMHO wet and dry is a better option)... Just Fyi, Outside Core most Wellness has just at much grain if not morethan many pro plan fromulas.

I also think a second opinion is in order though the RX food is for stomach issues( no do not ask me how the ingrediants help but it is a RX and is like a medicine and has Clinical evidence of working for stomach issues)
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
While, Pro plan is definately not my definition of good food , many, many millions of cats do well on it ... Also, many millions live to their 20's on dry food ( IMHO wet and dry is a better option)... Just Fyi, Outside Core most Wellness has just at much grain if not morethan many pro plan fromulas.

I also think a second opinion is in order though the RX food is for stomach issues( no do not ask me how the ingrediants help but it is a RX and is like a medicine and has Clinical evidence of working for stomach issues)
That's why I don't feed my cat Wellness. I told my friend to get it for a day or two to see if her cat would stop vomiting. No way I told her to feed Wellness for good. Something she could pickup at her local Petco that particular day.
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darlili View Post
Thank you - I expressed myself badly, but I indeed meant prescription food is just that - a specially developed food to treat a specific medical condition - so in a way it is medicine, helping to treat a condition just like Baytril would treat an infection.

Truly, if more than one vet suggests a prescription food, especially after full blood work, etc., is conducted, it is only prudent to try that food. Vets may not be certified feline nutritionists (well, not many people are), but they are people who've had years of training, and years of experience, in treating sick animals. If more than one is suggesting a certain course of treatment, it might be wise to consider it.

Also, I wouldn't stop feeding a prescription food without consultation with the treating vet - some conditions need the prescription food to be fed as a maintenance diet (e.g., cats prone to crystals) - others may not. It's sort of like stopping antibiotics when you feel better, but before the prescription runs out...the rebound effect may be worse than the original condition.
Only one vet suggested prescription food not two. I am still in a process of convincing her to see somebody else
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty's Mom View Post
I would ask for a complete blood workup. I would also consider a different vet for not suggesting this.

Several years ago my Dusty was also throwing up several times a day. As it was the time of year she normally sheds, I thought it was excessive hair balls. So the barfing finally stopped, but she had lost weight, and a significant amount down to 6 lbs from 8 lbs. Then I noticed she was drinking a lot and peeing a lot. Finally I took her to the vet, where he suggested a blood panel and a kidney ultrasound. The ultrasound didn't show much unusual, but the blood work indicated that she had CRF. CRF is quite common in cats, and you can either choose to treat it or not depending upon the personality and temperament of your cat. Cats have been known to live to well into their teens with CRF. My kitty is now 9 and I am opting not to treat her. I believe that the quality of her life is more important than how long she lives, and I don't want to torture her with treatment and cause her to become afraid of me.

Good luck with your friend's kitty.
Thanks. I will tell her about the blood work
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by maggieddd View Post
That's why I don't feed my cat Wellness. I told my friend to get it for a day or two to see if her cat would stop vomiting. No way I told her to feed Wellness for good. Something she could pickup at her local Petco that particular day.
Here is a FYI .. Lots of decent foods are found at Petco( they now have at least 5 grain frees ) .... But One or Two days will not tell anything even with vomiting due to the digestive cycle .... Your friend needs a second vet who hopefully will run some tests or review the prior tests with examination.. IMHO Non Vet opinion the cat likely has something along the lines of allergies or IBS ....
post #14 of 20
I think most of us are agreeing with you that a second opinion would be very wise - the caveat is if the second vet also suggests a prescription food, your friend may appreciate your support in trying the food, even if the ingredients are not, ah, internet approved. It sounds like you have a lot of influence with your friend - if you tell him prescription food is 'bad', he may not get it for his cat, and I honestly don't think that would be a good move. There are special lines of food to try with digestive problems - but just like with people with GI issues, even the best vet may have to try several treatment plans to see what works.

Heck, my Dante did badly on the Hills CD wet fish flavor - soft bowels and litter box issues. For some reason, the chicken flavor and the dry CD seem to be doing the trick -- took a while for the vet and me to figure out the right ratios.
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darlili View Post
I think most of us are agreeing with you that a second opinion would be very wise - the caveat is if the second vet also suggests a prescription food, your friend may appreciate your support in trying the food, even if the ingredients are not, ah, internet approved. It sounds like you have a lot of influence with your friend - if you tell him prescription food is 'bad', he may not get it for his cat, and I honestly don't think that would be a good move. There are special lines of food to try with digestive problems - but just like with people with GI issues, even the best vet may have to try several treatment plans to see what works.

Heck, my Dante did badly on the Hills CD wet fish flavor - soft bowels and litter box issues. For some reason, the chicken flavor and the dry CD seem to be doing the trick -- took a while for the vet and me to figure out the right ratios.
She already got it and is feeding the cat with it but was concerned how long he is supposed to be on it. Again, I never told her not to give him the prescribed food.
post #16 of 20
the timeline is definately a ask the vet .... Some need it for life other s only need it till the problem is found and fixed ( few weeks to few months)
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by maggieddd View Post
She already got it and is feeding the cat with it but was concerned how long he is supposed to be on it. Again, I never told her not to give him the prescribed food.
That depends on how well the cat does with it, and without it... If the cat only does well with that food, for example, it might be a situation where he can be on it for life - and there is no problem with that at all, if he is thriving.

Se... I have 2 cats, one with IBD and one with IBS... My Hope, the one with IBS, was on 100% wet food, until she had a huge flare, and got really really sick... I fought with tooth and nails against prescriptions, particularly against Hills... Boy, was I mistaken to do that! At the moment she started on the prescription diet (Z/D), she started getting better, and never again had a problem. She is doing wonderful, and I have no worries with her.
Try seeing if this food have a matching canned - they usually do.

Prescription diets are not medicine, but they serve a purpose as well as medicine, so if a vet prescribe it due to a problem, IMHO, you should really use it.

From your first post, a real issue was found on the ultrasound, it is not just a matter of opinion anymore:

Quote:
The ultrasound showed irritated intestines and stomach. The doctor recommended Dry food Purina Vet Diet EN.
After he is on this diet (and absolutely nothing else) for a couple of weeks, you will be better apt to judge how well the diet is working for him or not.... Before that, it is too soon to tell IMHO.
post #18 of 20
Yes EN has a canned formula
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina View Post
That depends on how well the cat does with it, and without it... If the cat only does well with that food, for example, it might be a situation where he can be on it for life - and there is no problem with that at all, if he is thriving.

Se... I have 2 cats, one with IBD and one with IBS... My Hope, the one with IBS, was on 100% wet food, until she had a huge flare, and got really really sick... I fought with tooth and nails against prescriptions, particularly against Hills... Boy, was I mistaken to do that! At the moment she started on the prescription diet (Z/D), she started getting better, and never again had a problem. She is doing wonderful, and I have no worries with her.
Try seeing if this food have a matching canned - they usually do.

Prescription diets are not medicine, but they serve a purpose as well as medicine, so if a vet prescribe it due to a problem, IMHO, you should really use it.

From your first post, a real issue was found on the ultrasound, it is not just a matter of opinion anymore:



After he is on this diet (and absolutely nothing else) for a couple of weeks, you will be better apt to judge how well the diet is working for him or not.... Before that, it is too soon to tell IMHO.
Yes, there is EN canned. I asked why she was prescribed dry and was told because that's what he has been eating dry all his life so why not continue with dry.
post #20 of 20
My boy gets CD dry and wet - because he apparently grew up on dry (I got him as an adult) and he just darn well likes his kibble - vet said no reason to overly stress him and force a change to wet (he does get wet, he much prefers his kibble) when there's a dry formulation. Sometimes you just gotta go with the form kitty will eat.
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