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Can you feed yogurt to your cat? I thought all cats are lactose intolerant?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I've seen people on youtube give yogurt to their cats.

I was shocked, and it made me have to do some research on it.

I haven't found the right answer.

Also, while I am on the subject of food.

What fruits and vegetables can cats eat?

Can cats eat apples?

Can cats eat cantaloupes and other melons?
post #2 of 18
Yogurt doesn't seem to have the same levels of lactose as cow's milk. I know I can't drink milk but yogurt doesn't cause me any problems. I've seen plain yogurt recommended for cats with diarrhea/digestive issues. Of course, my cats won't eat plain yogurt, but they L-O-O-O-O-V-E sweetened vanilla yogurt and some of the other fruit flavors.

When Shareena was a kitten she was crazy about honeydew melon, but she mostly ignores it now. I've never seen melons or apples on a list of things that are bad for cats. Maybe somebody else has better information.
post #3 of 18
i don't know but yesterday i gave daisy greek yogurt. she's had it a number of times in the last 6 monhts w/out any problems
post #4 of 18
Yogurt is good for cats when they are on antibiotics. Just a pea sized dab a day is all that is needed.

My Ootay (rb 5/09) loved yogurt, and it never gave her any problems. Her favorite flavors were lime, orange cream and strawberry. I only let her lick out a cup, never gave her large amounts.

Don't give the kind with fake sugar.
post #5 of 18
I think it has like half the lactose that the same quantity of milk would. It's not going to do very much for humans or animals that need a probiotic since your regular brands of yogurt do not have much active cultures in them. Why? Because it's heat treated to increase shelf life. (it also makes them sweeter, obviously this messes up the bacteria)
If you want one with a lot of live bacteria you have to get one that states that it does have active cultures, Otherwise just use a probiotic supplement as it contains live bacteria in much higher numbers.


And sure, cats can eat fruit and veggies. Lots of people have odd cats that will beg for them. But it's not a good idea to let a cat have much of these and it doesn't belong in their regular food.
post #6 of 18
Any yogurt I have bought does state "live active cultures" and while I use the probiotic probios now, in the past years before I knew about probios I used yogurt for cats on antibiotics and it was quite effective at controlling diarrhea brought on by antibiotics.

So yes, a specific probiotic supplement is better, but if all you have is yogurt, it can work just as well.

It's the sugar that is not good for them really, bad for their teeth. But never use yogurt with fake sugar.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post

It's the sugar that is not good for them really, bad for their teeth. But never use yogurt with fake sugar.
Out of curiosity, what is the issue with fake sugar? I have not heard this before so would like to know what problem it causes?
post #8 of 18
I don't know what artificial sweetener would do to cats, but I would not want to find out. I know it makes me sick and is very bad for humans, in general.

I try to avoid giving my cats anything artificial, anyway.

And so, when I suggest yogurt for diarrhea brought on by antibiotics, I always warn people not to give the kind with fake sweetener, because 1) I don't know what it would do to them and 2) in my opinion, it is bad for cats. In my opinion it is bad for everybody, every living thing!
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlleyGirl View Post
Out of curiosity, what is the issue with fake sugar? I have not heard this before so would like to know what problem it causes?
I know that dog have problems with Xylitol.
"Xylitol is used as a sweetener in many products, including gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. It can cause insulin release in most species, which can lead to liver failure. The increase in insulin leads to hypoglycemia (lowered sugar levels). Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to recumbancy and seizures. Elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days. -http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/new...eply&p=2823205"
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post
Any yogurt I have bought does state "live active cultures" and while I use the probiotic probios now, in the past years before I knew about probios I used yogurt for cats on antibiotics and it was quite effective at controlling diarrhea brought on by antibiotics.
Some people might buy the cheap stuff not paying attention to the label, though.

O/T - out of curiosity, how do artificial sweeteners affect you? I get nausea and headaches. My last run in with sucralose was particularly bad - I could move without gagging. I don't even want artificial sweeteners in my home.


BTW: Xylitol and related products are not actually artificial sweeteners - they're sugar alcohols. (ethylene glycol is also a sugar alcohol) Most people can tolerate the ones used in foods, which is why they get widely used in sugar free products. Though it's hard to find candies that aren't xylitol and aspartame now (twice as bad for pets). Even in humans too much xylitol consumption does cause diarrhea.
post #11 of 18
I can not have any fake sugars.
I get very sick within 5 minutes of having it.
I know it can cause liver damage to cats.
The sphynx breeder give plain yogurt to sphynx when they throw up.
I have done it with my sphynx.
It must be plain though with no fake sugars.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
Some people might buy the cheap stuff not paying attention to the label, though.

O/T - out of curiosity, how do artificial sweeteners affect you? I get nausea and headaches. My last run in with sucralose was particularly bad - I could move without gagging. I don't even want artificial sweeteners in my home.


BTW: Xylitol and related products are not actually artificial sweeteners - they're sugar alcohols. (ethylene glycol is also a sugar alcohol) Most people can tolerate the ones used in foods, which is why they get widely used in sugar free products. Though it's hard to find candies that aren't xylitol and aspartame now (twice as bad for pets). Even in humans too much xylitol consumption does cause diarrhea.

Too much sugar alcohols of any kind can trigger diarrhea in people who are sensitive. I found out the hard way.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by AddieBee View Post
Too much sugar alcohols of any kind can trigger diarrhea in people who are sensitive. I found out the hard way.
So can sugar and HFCS - it causes too much water to be drawn into the colon. Some people are more sensitive than others...

I assume it's the same with cats, and if they got a hold of too much sugar would get some pretty nasty diarrhea. I never intend to find out.
post #14 of 18
My cat who throws up at the slightest TASTE of milk (ie. sneaking even a lick out of my bowl or cup will make her vomit several times in the next hour...you'd think she'd learn, but she will still try it if we're not careful) loves yogurt, cream cheese, sour cream, etc. and does not have the same reaction to it.

I know I have a friend who is allergic to milk (not lactose intolerant) but can have other dairy products. I think it has something to do with how they are prepared.
post #15 of 18
My cats have always eaten plain unsweetened yoghurt, usually the Greek type, with no ill effects. They also love fresh cream cheese (fromage frais) and Persil demands a treat of a morsel of hard cheese, cheddar or Emmenthal, each morning. All these are low lactose. Our shelter also feeds kittens fromage frais as a supplement.
post #16 of 18
the bacterial cultures in yogurt makes it easier to digest. most dairy products that contain active bacterial cultures (cheeses, sour cream, yogurt) are easier on lactose intolerant tummies. i think it is because the bacterias partially break down the milk sugars.

raw versus pasteurized makes a big difference in digestibility as well. i love unpasteurized cheeses, they never set of my lactose issues.
post #17 of 18

Cats are obligate carnivores! They shouldn't be fed fruit.

post #18 of 18

I read on some other website about foods you can and cannot give to a cat, my cat ran off with a piece of popcorn and ate it so I wanted to make sure she wasn't going to die from it. Apparently, Cat's can eat yogurt (and popcorn) because it's not made of milk. Plain yogurt has probiotics and can in fact be an okay snack for her. It can also be a nice treat for her/him on a hot summer's day. You probably don't want to give it to her as a food alternative because yea it might make her sick e.g. throwing up/diarrhea  but just a little is okay for your cat.If your not really sure, ask your vet.   

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