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Do cats really do better in pairs?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
* Not sure if this is in the right place, please feel free to move it if it isn't.

The title is my question: Do cats really do better in pairs? I'm wondering if I should get Kiki a playmate. I don't know, but it's a thought. Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 17
I think cats do better in pairs, but you gave away your Pixie when you moved because where you were moving didn't allow pets and that didn't turn out so well. Are you living somewhere that allows pets now? Are you going to be living there a really long time? If after a year or so you will have to move again with the possibility of leaving another cat behind I would say "don't do it". If Kiki is lonely, maybe you could foster instead. That way Kiki is happy and you're giving a helping hand to a foster cat.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dandi View Post
I think cats do better in pairs, but you gave away your Pixie when you moved because where you were moving didn't allow pets and that didn't turn out so well. Are you living somewhere that allows pets now? Are you going to be living there a really long time? If after a year or so you will have to move again with the possibility of leaving another cat behind I would say "don't do it". If Kiki is lonely, maybe you could foster instead. That way Kiki is happy and you're giving a helping hand to a foster cat.
No we won't be here for a long time, but we have a Great Dane so our next place will HAVE to allow pets (this place does too). We will NOT give away our dog this time so I figure the cat(s) would be pretty safe too. We only have one more move after this...well two. Our next duty station and then our retirement place. Hubby says we are looking at Texas. He's talking about wanting to do offshore drilling. I figure he'll be too old for that by then...he'll be almost 40. But I will NOT give away another cat....finding out what happened to Pixie broke my heart. I have been trolling the shelter websites at our last place trying to find her. I even emailed a girl who adopted a 4 yr old spayed Siamese last night, but it wasn't Pixie.

The lady I gave Pixie too said there were a lot of barn cats surrounding her home and she figured Pixie took up with one of them.

Like I said right now it's just a thought. I may look into the foster thing. Although, how do you not get too attached?
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by marinewife05 View Post
I may look into the foster thing. Although, how do you not get too attached?
That's the hard part. I think it helps knowing that it is only temporary from the get-go. Then again, there are some cats that just "click" with you and there is no way you could ever let them go. I've only fostered two cats and I ended up keeping one of them!
post #5 of 17
With fostering, the shelters are always happy to give you another one right away Saying that my foster is still at home so...
post #6 of 17
I took in Ginger as a foster in April. She was pregnant and I fully intended on not keeping her or her babies. That continued until her babies were 5 weeks old. One baby did stay and so did Ginger. But I did try and rehome Ginger--but failed. Rehoming the babies was bittersweet but like someone said when you take them in knowing they aren't staying its easier. I couldn't provide for all of them and there were families who deserved to enjoy them.

Its funny now that I realize the circumstances behind Ginger staying and her one baby staying were meant to be things. Ginger has cage aggression, that makes her much more unadoptable in a shelter situation, and for me made it difficult to send her to a home with children. She is completely safe here.

Pepper, Gingers baby, is food aggressive--I dont' know why, she has never had to fight for food, or been without food. But she will bite for food. I couldn't send her to a home with children either. I felt most comfortable having her with me, because I know how to be with her. I would feel guilty rehoming her.

Leslie
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
If I decide to foster how does that work? I have Kiki of course, a Great Dane and a toddler plus older kids. What would happen if they give me a foster that doesn't like one of the above...do I just keep them separated will they take him/her back if it doesn't work out?

Next question is how do you get started doing that?
post #8 of 17
I have always been a single kitty person, and they my best friend.......I think that I drive Maia crazy enough, she doesn't need a fuzzy buddy! They do best with a partner, whether or not it's a kitty, or a person depends on the living situation and sometimes the cat.
post #9 of 17
To answer all of your questions.....find a local shelter in need of fosters & just ask.

Many times they try to screen potential foster parents & pets to ensure a right fit. Here if the pet isn't fitting in the foster home, we take them back to the shelter.
post #10 of 17
When we first got Hercules it was the intention that he would be an only cat but he has major seperation anxiety where when BF and I would both be gone (mostly when BF was gone) Hercules would sit at the door and howl and cry till someone came home. He was never really happy when I got home but when BF would get home from work Herc would greet him at the door and then sit the whole night on the couch right next to or on top of BF. When we noticed how bad he was being seperated from BF we decided to get another cat for him to have as a playmate. Well needless to say the howling and crying stopped but not because Fatman is Hercs playmate but I think just company for him to be around. Herc still sits and waits in the bay window for us to get home if we leave and will greet us at the door but he doesnt howl or cry anymore. And currently we are up to 3 cats and 1 dog! Its kind of like our addiction but since we dont plan on having an children our pets are our kids!
post #11 of 17
I think so. There are some cats that really do better as a single cat who gets all of the attention (I've had a few like that).

In my experience, females tend to take longer to accept a newcomer into the house. Ling was the only female in the house - she took over 6 months to accept Charlie coming in and only about a month when Jack came in.

Males tend to bond a lot faster with a new cat. Charlie was playing with his baby brother Jack within a few days of him arriving!
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by marinewife05 View Post

Like I said right now it's just a thought. I may look into the foster thing. Although, how do you not get too attached?
I've fostered three times -- one puppy, one kitten, one full grown cat. With the first two, I did get very attached and cried when they went to their new homes -- but the grief is short-lived, I think, because you know they're going to a good and safe home and not to God-knows-what or dying.

The full grown cat still lives with me, almost 6 years later.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
In my experience, females tend to take longer to accept a newcomer into the house. Ling was the only female in the house - she took over 6 months to accept Charlie coming in and only about a month when Jack came in.

Males tend to bond a lot faster with a new cat. Charlie was playing with his baby brother Jack within a few days of him arriving!
Again, it depends on the cat. I think more if the female was an only cat than if with another when a new cat is brought in.
My Sho still doesn't like Sherman or Siri - Sherman has been here since December and Siri's been in since August. Siri fusses but I catch her snuggled up to Tomas fairly often. Tomas, the submissive cat accepts others within days. Sherman doesn't seem to really care as long as no one tries to swat or chase him.

Personally, I think cats do better together. They are social animals. Those that don't tolerate another cat are very dependent on their human(s) for that interaction.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
I find Kiki will cry at times for no reason. She has fresh water, food, clean litter, plenty of toys, and several play sessions thru-out the day. When she cries I try to pet her, but she normally goes right into full bite mode. (biting and holding and then the rabbit kick thing) She won't play with the dog...she smacks him on the nose every time he comes near.

I guess this is my basis for thinking she wants a playmate. But I don't know maybe that's not it at all. Maybe her broken tail is causing her pain? She doesn't cringe or cry when you touch it. The military vet said she (as in if it were her cat) would remove it. (However, hubby doesn't relish the idea of paying for surgery to remove it)

The vet we use out in town would charge an office visit of $60.00 just to give me her opinion about removing the tail. Maybe I'll call them on Monday or call around and get estimates. You would think since she came from the SPCA they would do it. They really should have done it when they fixed her.
post #15 of 17
it honestly depends on the cat. prissy is more than happy being an only cat, because she does not like to share. she accepts other kitties most of the time, but she always stays pretty distant from them. My advice, as others have said, is to try fostering, and you can see how KiKi reacts to having other kitties. If KiKi doesn't like others, then you know you;ve got an "only cat" situation. However, if you find Kiki curled up with the other kitty and them grooming each other, consider adopting that cat.
post #16 of 17
I know my cats do well in pairs (4 of them). And, I second it ... of please do not involve any other animals in your life if you cannot make a life commitment to them.
post #17 of 17
I think it really depends on the cat/environment. When I was growing up, we always just had our one cat, Copper (female DSH). We had a beagle for a little bit, but she was our only cat - adopted from the shelter when she was 6 months, and had her until she was put down at 14 yrs (oral squamous carcinoma ) She was a sweet, but not extremely affectionate, kitty who I think was perfect as the only cat in the house.

Now, my boyfriend and I have two cats who we adopted as a pair - Darb and Cheeseball are brothers from the same litter who we can't imagine without each other. So it depends on the cat when you get them, and their enviromnment.
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