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Laser Declawing - Page 2

post #31 of 51
i must apoligise i jumped down your throat without reading your post right

im thinking about soft paws for my two as they are not going to be living fwith me for a while so i dont want them to scratch and damage furniture at the (future)MIL's house
post #32 of 51
Now, when you get your soft paws we need pictures of your little divas showing off their bright pinkies, even better the red ones!, now that's a diva colour!
post #33 of 51
You must also understand I have literally killed hundreds of cats - declawed cats who have behavior issues to the point that it makes then unsafe to adopt out. And I bawl with every one of them - it's hard not to, when they are that way because their owner wanted to save their furniture. They didn't choose to be that way, they didn't get asked if they wanted to be mutilated.

Many times our posts come across as harsh, because so many times no matter what we say people do not listen - they declaw anyways - and come back later wanting help for behavioral issues caused by the declaw.

From your original post, I would have thought you were seriously considering declawing your kitty. I'd rather bombard you with info beforehand, than have to help you with the problems declawing can cause after the fact.

I have only raised 1 kitten into adulthood that I kept. She had to wear Soft Paws from about 6 months to 2 years - but she now understands to use the scratching post & I have no problems with her.
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiberius709 View Post
I thought that was the best part I just think they would look so cute with bright pink nails... and my furniture wouldn't be getting all messed up!
I have a friend that keeps asking, do you really need those? I think NO, but I love it when they have the cute nails . I buy 4 differnt colors. Levi gets purple, Jordan gets blue, Isaac gets red & Maggie gets pink.
post #35 of 51
Actually, there is some laser surgery which stops the claw movement so they are not removed but not usable so if the OPs vet was suggesting this it isnt counted as an amputation but is still serious surgery. As for the OPs question on cost, laser declawing and tenectomies are more expensive than regular declawing but can vary a lot from vet to vet

Secondly, new research shows that increased biting after declawing is a myth, using false information just gives people a reason to answer back...

However, unless it really is your last resort, try soft paws, clipping short using gloves etc first.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
Many vets will not tell you it is amputating, or that it is a routine procedure. In fact, most vets perform several declaws every week...declaw is offered at the same time as spay/neuter regularly - at a discounted rate. It is hard to find a vet who doesn't declaw. Actually, in many countries declawing is illegal, believe it or not. Yet it is so commonplace in the US.
wow whitecatlover. that's news to me. yikes. yikes because i look at vets as ultra-humane so reading this puts me in a very bewildered state! my vets never offered declawing and i never asked. penny & daisy still have their claws/paws and it will stay that way. also, the vets never provided any education to me on declawing either verbal or brochures - nothing. i learned about declawing on TCS!
post #37 of 51
Most vets offer it with spay/neuter here, even the low cost spay/neuter clinic
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by c1atsite View Post
wow whitecatlover. that's news to me. yikes. yikes because i look at vets as ultra-humane so reading this puts me in a very bewildered state! my vets never offered declawing and i never asked. penny & daisy still have their claws/paws and it will stay that way. also, the vets never provided any education to me on declawing either verbal or brochures - nothing. i learned about declawing on TCS!
Not only do the offer it with the spay/neuter as if it is just a matter of course. I had one vet try to talk me into it stating he had very good pain control techniques. I do go to that clinic, but my kitties never go to that particular vet.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
Secondly, new research shows that increased biting after declawing is a myth, using false information just gives people a reason to answer back...
IMHO this is far far from a myth.... I would be interested in the source of these researches... It sounds to me they might be quite biased to say the least...
Also, saying that someone Like Nat who like she says, literally and personally participated in the euthanasia of hundreds of cats with behavioral problems directly derived of declawing are giving False information is quite unfair, and uncalled for, IMHO.
post #40 of 51
I work in a shelter just like Nat does, I see the cats with behavioural problems but unlike Nat, I get to see them sit in cages as person after person turns them down, but you know what, we have just as many with claws with behavioural issues and they sit there too.

I am not saying go ahead and declaw, but if people can find legitimate (and there is a lot of it recently) research to refute the claims made, they will ignore the whole argument of not declawing. My own vet who will not declaw unless for medical reasons even agrees that the newest research seems to have some truth to it, not that she has looked into it that deeply as she doesnt do declaws.

People say litterbox issues and biting are the main reasons for declawed cats ending up in the shelter, well the percentages of speutered (and therefore cared for at some point) cats who end up in the shelter with litterbox issues or biting issues is almost identical for the shelters around here. Most of those with litterbox issues have untreated UTIs and are fine once treated too.

I have a copy of the study at the shelter and would be happy to share, it still comes to the conclusion that in 95% of cases the declaw surgery was not needed and there was no reason why the cat could not be trained, have its claws clipped short or use soft claws so I dont see the bias in the study. It also found that declawed cats are less likely to be brought to the vet as they are seen as indoor only and therefore do not require shots etc/
post #41 of 51
My aunt made the mistake of declawing Ranidi and Tinkerbelle,
Randi fell and got hurt very bad because she had no claws to grab on with and both cats became biters.
In fact Tinkerbelle had to be given away because she became so mean.
Both cats never bit before they were declawed.
I also know other people that it happened to also.
In fact if you by a cat from a breeder it is in the contracts not to do either type of surgery.
post #42 of 51
It is in the contract because it is inhumane, not because it causes biting.

As for declawing for saving furniture, Autumn is declawed (she was declawed by the shelter in a last ditch attempt to curb her vicious behaviour) and while she doesnt bite, she has wrecked my furniture using her back claws - she holds on with her front paws and bunny kicks with her back claws so declawing doesnt help with it - I am not sure if she would have destroyed the furniture with claws once socialised as I never even had her out of her cage when clawed.
post #43 of 51
Yosimite - you mentioned about declawing and auto-immunie system people needing it done.

Since declawing is banned in most of the Europeon countries like the UK, people there with AIDS own cats and they have claws. So I feel that is not a legit reason at all to recommend declawing.

Have to agree with White Cat Lover and Bea's story. IMO that story needs to be printed out and posted in EVERY shelter and vet office in the USA! If a person declaws after reading that, then they have NO heart at all!
post #44 of 51
I know that is in the contract because it is inhumane.
I was just saying I know so many cats that have bit after being declawed and turned mean.
post #45 of 51
Well, I was going to jump in, but I see that everything has been covered . Anyway, yeah, there's no difference whether you use laser surgery or traditional surgery to de-claw a cat....just like if you have your toes amputated, it doesn't really matter whether the doctor uses a laser or a scalpel. Just that with a laser there's less chance of serious bleeding. That's the only difference. The toes are still gone. FOREVER.

I have seen the studies that claim that de-clawed cats do not have higher chances of litterbox problems or aggression. I understand this is a hard thing to quantify. But, in my personal experience, de-clawing does not usually have a good effect on the cat's personality, and litterbox issues seem to be very common in de-clawed cats. But this could be because, if a fully-clawed cat won't use the litterbox, the owners just let him outside and he's OK with it. But some people won't do that with a de-clawed cat.

De-clawing is inhumane and usually totally unnecessary. This is the reason people should not have their cats de-clawed---not because they're afraid of personality changes, although this is a valid risk that they should at least be aware of.

But de-claws are highly profitable to vets, and very few will turn down that much in pure profit.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
Yosimite - you mentioned about declawing and auto-immunie system people needing it done.

Since declawing is banned in most of the Europeon countries like the UK, people there with AIDS own cats and they have claws. So I feel that is not a legit reason at all to recommend declawing.
Even though we are against it, we also are aware that there are instances where it may be necessary for medical reasons, i.e., a compromised immune system of a cat owner is one good example. In cases like that it would be wonderful if that person adopted an already declawed cat from a shelter rather than declawing another poor animal.

Note that I said it may be necessary for medical reasons. Nowhere have I recommended it - that is your interpretation of my post and you used the word "recommend", not I.

I personally clip nails, find that's perfectly fine and would highly recommend that.
post #47 of 51
Use the link below to find out all about what declawing does, how it can affect your cat for life. Read stories from people who declawed their cats and wished they could turn back time and not have done it.

http://www.declaw.lisaviolet.com/

A Vet Tech's story:

http://www.declaw.lisaviolet.com/declawvettch.html
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiberius709 View Post
I hate struggling with them and they use their back paws like weapons.

It can be a challenge, with some due to individual personalities and history.

Our Taz and Morgan are good, they have been clipped regularily since they were very small. Taz just thinks clipping is attention, Morgan only thinks of escaping because she wants to get down to run arround.

My "challenge" is Kasey. She was introduced to clipping at 8+ years old and she had some abuse before I brought her home a year an a half ago; and add "tortitude" to that

The only thing in my favor is that she has imprinted on my and "claimed" me; I am like "mother cat" to her and she stick pretty close to me.

I have worked at getting her used to the idea.

I catch her when she is very restful. I clip one claw at a time and pay attention to her in between clips. Sometimes I would only get a couple claws done before she attacked (not really mean, just telling me she wasn't sure she liked it), I would have to stop and start again, remembering where I left off.

It has been a process but she is getting much better about it.
post #49 of 51
When I took my kittens to the vet for their six week visit, spaying (they are all girls) was the main focus of my questions. Quite a few times the vet brought up declawing and I finally looked at him with this nasty face and told him I didn't believe in that.

They way I look at it, it is like having kids and expecting them to never spill or stain anything they come in contact with. You take on the responsibility of having a kittie, you understand there is training involved and somethings may get damaged.

I adopted a declawed kitty and she had some issues. Even around family, if there was a loud noise, she was afraid. That is no way to live.

I know my post doesn't apply to the OP but I wanted to share my thoughts.
post #50 of 51
My vets do laser declawing. It doesn't change the actual procedure at all, it's just a different way of doing the incision. Laser incisions usually cause less blood loss and pain than scalpel incisions, but declawing is still a major surgery with the potential for lots and lots of pain.

My vets do not like declawing at all. One of them brought up declawing as a potential last-ditch effort in case we can't figure out what is causing my cat to claw her face off, but she was extremely relieved that I don't believe in declawing.

Have you tried Soft Paws? If the problem is that the cats are still damaging stuff even with regular nail trims, they should solve your problem. I just put the first set on my face-scratching kitty today and it wasn't too hard.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Bengals View Post
Use the link below to find out all about what declawing does, how it can affect your cat for life. Read stories from people who declawed their cats and wished they could turn back time and not have done it.

http://www.declaw.lisaviolet.com/

A Vet Tech's story:

http://www.declaw.lisaviolet.com/declawvettch.html
I cried when I read that story and saw those pictures. If I wasn't against declawing before (which I was) I am now definitely against declawing!
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