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Diet to manage megacolon

post #1 of 137
Thread Starter 
Hello all,

I am new to this forum, but my name is Becky and I am a veterinary technician. The cat in question is actually our hospital cat, who I share a special bond with. She follows me everywhere in the clinic and everyone there calls her my cat. The doctor on more than one occasion has even told me I should take her home. It may happen in the future. Anyways, Kattie is a long haired tabby that we estimate to be about 5-6 years old. She has always had issues with hairballs and now constipation that has gotten pretty severe. She also has a history of severe allergies that contributes to her overgrooming which makes her get hairballs and therefore the costipation occurs. I have a very good gut feeling that this may all be diet related and that if we change her diet it might help alot. She is on Hills Science diet W/d which I am not a fan of. I actually dislike all science diet foods and think that they are overpriced subpar food. The W/D is a very high fiber food which in the past has been used to treat megacolon, which is what the doctor is saying she has. He is also saying if the w/d isn't working then the only thing that can help her is surgery to take out the colon and resect the small intestine to the rectum. I think there are still many medical and dietary avenues that we can try before that. I suggested lactulose which we have never tried and he has never used. He agreed to that aeven though he thinks that it won't work. He is an old school vet and is pretty set in his ways and reccomends science diet for everything. I believe that a low fiber diet might help her more because the stools that she tries to produce on the w/d are huge and rock hard. I have decided that I am going to purchase a higher quality food that both our hospital cats can eat, even if I have to pay for it. I know that canned is better which we will give everyday, but I want to get a better quality dry as well. I was looking at innova, which is what I feed my allergic dog with success. the fiber on the dry is 1.5%. The california natural is also really good. I just need some suggestions on good foods that will help a megacolon allergic kitty. Any other advice on supplements as well will be appreciated. That way I can have some suggestions to give the doctor to help little Kattie.

Thanks in advance,
Becky
post #2 of 137
Hi Becky! I have a cat with Megacolon and severe constipation. He started just a little while back to start to really go down hill and it also created other issues for him. We tried Lactalose and it stopped helping him after a very short period of time. Many different vets, even specialists were telling us the next step would be removal of the colon if he had to keep being "put out and dug out". Now things have seem to really change for him ..... at least so far!

Two major things I learned:

1. Megacolon kitties actually need to be on a no grain diet. Not high fiber like you'd think. We use Wellness Core dry and wet.
2. Miralax, Miralax, Miralax! Way better than Lactalose and much much easier to get into the kitty. Miralax has been our lifesaver! If your vet is old school I bet he has never heard of it since even today's vets are few and far between. There is info on it at the Yahoo Feline Megacolon Group that you can print out and take with you to your vet. I highly recommend that you visit this group! There is so much helpful info there for steps to take before your last resort (surgery). The people in this group all have kitties with Megacolon or severe constipation and are wonderful about answering questions from their own experiences with this issue.

Got any questions let me know and I'll be happy to help!

Babz
post #3 of 137
I have dealt with IBD in cats, dogs and humans...

with the cats and dogs a RAW and canned diet seemed to work here... of course you need to discuss that with a vet at work...
post #4 of 137
A Raw diet worked great for my IBD cat but not with my megacolon cat. For some reason it made the problem worse no matter what trick I tried. And added fibre had her at the vet for enema's. A low fibre grain free canned food (MAX 1 to 1.5% fibre content), miralax and cisapride have been life saviours for her. Lactulose stopped working for her as well.
post #5 of 137
Since this cat is only five or six years old, the best avenue would be the surgery. Megacolon in a cat that young is facing a lifetime of medications that have to be continually increased.

however I advise you to take the cat home, so she is yours, and you have control over what happens to her, and take her to a vet experienced in this surgery.

Lactulose is at best, ineffective, and the doses have to be constantly increased. She WILL need some sort of laxative though, either mineral oil or Miralax. She will need Cisapride, which is very expensive, and again, has to be continually increased.

I agree about the low fiber foods to keep the stools smaller, but I think surgery is the best avenue for this cat. There is no other cure for megacolon, and she has years ahead of her.

My Ootay had megacolon, but by the time it was properly diagnosed she was too ill in other ways to manage such an invasive surgery. But if she had only been 6 years old I would have had the surgery done, no question. By the time I lost her she was taking medicine 8 times a day, just to poop. she was at the maximum dose of all of them. Your kitty is to young to be dealing with all that.

By the way. The prescription foods your vet sells are not Science Diet. They are Prescription Diet. Hills makes two lines, their grocery store formulas (Science Diet) and the special prescription formulas for specific health concerns, Prescription Diet.. It's true the Prescription Diets are not the best as far as ingredients, but they are sometimes neccessary for certain illnesses.

However I agree with you that this, your kitty's megacolon, is not a case for the high fiber prescription diet. Bring her home, get her to another vet, and have the surgery. You'll be glad you did!
post #6 of 137
[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto View Post
Since this cat is only five or six years old, the best avenue would be the surgery. Megacolon in a cat that young is facing a lifetime of medications that have to be continually increased.
I am not 100% sure I agree with this statement. This cat was obviously being given the wrong treatment for megacolon. I think before she goes the route of surgery - because the surgery DOES NOT guarantee a life free of megacolon - she should try the low fibre canned food, Miralax and Cisapride (if need be). And if these avenues do not produce good results then she may have to consider the surgery. This cat may not be very far along with megacolon (who knows if the cat even has megacolon or is just reacting badly to the added fibre) at all and may not even need Cisapride.


Quote:
take her to a vet experienced in this surgery
.

I agree

Quote:
She will need Cisapride, which is very expensive, and again, has to be continually increased.
Are you sure it has to be continually increased? In some cats maybe. Depends on how severe the case is and how soon you catch the megacolon and start treating it properly with diet and the proper stool softner (not lactulose). My 9 year old megacolon cats dosage of Cisapride and Miralax has continually been decreased since we started it in April.


Quote:
I think surgery is the best avenue for this cat. There is no other cure for megacolon, and she has years ahead of her
.

But she can have many happy and healthy years ahead with proper management with diet and if need be medication. Once again - the surgery is not a guarantee that the cat will not have complications from the surgery or the megacolon. Just go on the Feline Megacolon group on yahoo and you will see first hand that the surgery is no guarantee.

Quote:
My Ootay had megacolon, but by the time it was properly diagnosed she was too ill in other ways to manage such an invasive surgery. But if she had only been 6 years old I would have had the surgery done, no question. By the time I lost her she was taking medicine 8 times a day, just to poop. she was at the maximum dose of all of them. Your kitty is to young to be dealing with all that.

I am so sorry to hear Ootay went through all of this. Unfortunately it sounds like she was sick in other ways as well. And her body may have shut down. And was too week to respond to the treatment and this was why she was at the max dosage?

One day if the medication stops working for Lexus (she is nowhere near the max dosage the doctor allowed for her) then I may consider the surgery. But for now she is happy and healthy and pooping on a regular basis with the right dosages and diet. It may take a bit of time to understand what works for your kitty (it has been a journey for Lexus and I) but it is worth it in the end.
post #7 of 137
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for your input. I really do want to take Kattie home, but it might be a bit before I can. In the meantime, I want to make some changes at least to her diet and the medications we give her to see if they work first, before surgery. The times of true imapaction seem to have a pattern by looking at her chart. The first time we put her under was back in Oct of 2007, then she was fine until Jan of 2008. Then again Oct 2008, Jan 2009, now Oct 2009. It seems to coincide to when her allergies seem to get really bad and she start grooming more. She gets catlax every day for the hair, oddly enough she doesn't seem to throw up many hairballs. After every single clean out, we go back to putting her on Feline W/D which if you look at the ingredients they are very high in grain and other nasties. I finally told the doctor, that what we are doing isn't working, so lets try something different and I suggested getting completely away from Hills food. I went out and got California Natural, which, I know still has grain, but the fiber content is only 1.5% for the dry! I also got a bunch of canned food as well, all the higher quality foods, and my local petstore who admired what I was doing even gave me free cans of food. I brought it to work yesterday, and gave a 1/4 can of the food and she loved it. She hates w/d canned and probably only eats it to survive. She was chowing on this food and purring at the same time. I am going to try the lactulose but keep in mind that it might not work. I will definately look into the miralax. I will keep you all updated to what I find.
post #8 of 137
[quote=Denali;2736807]
Quote:

I am not 100% sure I agree with this statement. This cat was obviously being given the wrong treatment for megacolon. I think before she goes the route of surgery - because the surgery DOES NOT guarantee a life free of megacolon - she should try the low fibre canned food, Miralax and Cisapride (if need be). And if these avenues do not produce good results then she may have to consider the surgery. This cat may not be very far along with megacolon (who knows if the cat even has megacolon or is just reacting badly to the added fibre) at all and may not even need Cisapride.


.

I agree



Are you sure it has to be continually increased? In some cats maybe. Depends on how severe the case is and how soon you catch the megacolon and start treating it properly with diet and the proper stool softner (not lactulose). My 9 year old megacolon cats dosage of Cisapride and Miralax has continually been decreased since we started it in April.


.

But she can have many happy and healthy years ahead with proper management with diet and if need be medication. Once again - the surgery is not a guarantee that the cat will not have complications from the surgery or the megacolon. Just go on the Feline Megacolon group on yahoo and you will see first hand that the surgery is no guarantee.




I am so sorry to hear Ootay went through all of this. Unfortunately it sounds like she was sick in other ways as well. And her body may have shut down. And was too week to respond to the treatment and this was why she was at the max dosage?

One day if the medication stops working for Lexus (she is nowhere near the max dosage the doctor allowed for her) then I may consider the surgery. But for now she is happy and healthy and pooping on a regular basis with the right dosages and diet. It may take a bit of time to understand what works for your kitty (it has been a journey for Lexus and I) but it is worth it in the end.
Thanks for sharing another opinion! In my opinion, a cat of 5 or 6 years old should have the surgery.

That is of course, after a competent knowledgeable vet has been consulted, and proper diagnostics and other health tests done. I was not advising anyone to just jump in with surgery without proper diagnosis and overall health evaluation.

Ootay was diagnosed by x-ray with megacolon at age 12 after several years of messing about with an incompetent vet. By then my new vet felt her system had been too weakened to do well with such an invasive surgery.

Yes, I am sure the cisapride, and laxatives, have to be continually increased. Just like many other medicines, a body gets used to the medicine, and more is needed to be affected. She was started on 1/4 of a 10 mg tablet a day, with darn near miraculous affects. Four years later, with gradual increases as the medicine lost it's effectiveness, she was up to 15 mg a day.

Ootay was on them for 6 years, and maxed out on the dosages by the fourth year. She did not begin developing the other illnesses until she was just past 15.
post #9 of 137
Thread Starter 
Just wanted to update you guys on Kattie. She is actually doing really well this week since her poopy extractions last week. I am still working on taking her home with me but I see that happening eventually. Anyways, I have her on California Natural Dry which has 1.5% Fiber. She is also getting a quarter can twice a day as well. The canned foods are Innova, Natural Balance, Ca Natural ect. All these foods are highly digestable and lower fiber. I also have her on a starting dose of lactulose three times daily and she is having a nearly normal stool once daily. The first few days she didn't have any, but that is normal after the manual extractions. She is acting much more playful and back to her normal self. I am going to keep what we are doing but also am keeping the miralax in mind for the next level if the lactulose stops working. She is also getting catlax because she is grooming herself more now and I am worried that the hair might build up and cause issues. Also I read somewhere that mineral oil is bad long term for cats but can't find the reason why, does anyone know? Anyways, she is doing great so far so I'll keep you posted.
post #10 of 137
Mineral oil can interfere with the absorption of nutrients. Any laxative can., so be sure to give the lactulose on an empty stomach an hour before a meal.

Prolonged use of mineral oil can cause deficiencies of certain vitamins. On the other hand, cat lax is made with cod liver oil. Too much cod liver oil can cause a vitamin A toxicity in cats.

Because of these issues, I use three different kinds of hairball remedies, rotating them.

thanks for the update on Kattie. I'm glad she's doing better, she is lucky to have you there!
post #11 of 137
Thread Starter 
Well I haven't been on for a while but I just wanted to let you guys know that Kattie my clinic cat at work is doing great on her new treatment. She is eating California Natural Chicken and Brown Rice dry with 1.5% fiber and Natural Balance and California Natural Canned. She is also getting Lactulose three times daily. So far so good and her bowel movements have been normal with only the occasional day without stool. I do want to take her and still will try if I ever leave that job but for now I think it is under control. On another note I was adopted by a semi stray but I will talk about him in another thread.
post #12 of 137
Thread Starter 
Well I am bringing up an old post, but it has relevence. I am finally going to be taking Kattie home! It is a bittersweet moment though as i am leaving my job to move to Wa state. It will be neat to be closer to my family, but sad as I am leaving my job which I consider my second home and family. The doctor was really nice about it and excited for me as I will finally be closer to my own family. He also said that I could take Kattie because I am the one keeping her poopy issues under control. She has been doing really great lately. She is still eating the Ca natural and canned food. She is also on lactulose three times daily. She hasn't had an issue with constipation since my first post in october which is great, as she was technically due to be cleaned out in January according to her pattern lol. Anyways, she has a stool about once daily to every other day which I read is normal.
I do have another cat who is very laid back, unfortunately I am going to have to introduce them in a shorter period of time than I like as I am moving the first week of June. Kattie is very particular about litter boxes and so I worry that she will hold it because she won't have a kennel to poop in at night. ( we put her in a kennel with a litter box at night to monitor her stool) I will have three litterboxes for 2 cats which I hope is enough. Also my male cat is on Blue Wilderness Chicken and Rice which is grain free I was going to do half Ca Natural and half Blue plus canned food for both. I do a mix of good quality canned mixed with select varieties of Fancy Feast, as my male is picky about canned food. I have a drinkwell fountain for water plus the dog bowl which Oscar likes as well lol. I hope I am doing the right thing. It is soo stressful to move. I just hope the stress doesn't bring out issues in the cats. Well will be driving which will take two days with an overnight stop in a motel. If anyone has any other advice let me know.

Thanks,

Becky
post #13 of 137
I just found your thread Becky.

I am glad that Kattie is doing so well.
Thank you for taking her with you when you move.
I found that dehydration was the biggest danger when I took long road trips with my cats.
It is important to give the kitties plenty of fluids, maybe add water to their wet food.

You might want to consider stariing another thread about your move in our behavior forum, with a link added to this thread.

Good luck..
be sure to keep us updated.
post #14 of 137
Hello everyone --

I feel so lucky I stumbled upon this forum and this specific thread! My cat Baylor is 5.5 and has been diagnosed with Megacolon for a little over a year. We never noticed any problems with him until about a year ago, and he was getting so backed up and having extensive vomiting and lost a bunch of weight. After trying two vet's offices unsuccessful with a diagnosis, we finally were told at the third office that Megacolon was Baylor's issue. He has received a steroid shot every 8 weeks for a little over a year and has been on the Hills Prescription W/D dry cat food. I would like the intervals in between shots to be longer, but around 8 weeks is when he backs up again, starts vomiting, and needs some relief.

We have always fed our cats Innova, but the vet has us now on W/D. I have read about the California Natural food on this board and am interested in trying it and incorporating some canned food also for him and his sister.

However, I would really like him off this steriod shot. He has been monitored with labwork to ensure his body is fine after a year of the shots and everything on the labs was fine and within the ranges, but I still am not a fan. Would the Lactulose three times daily maintain a cat like Baylor and keep him off the shots? Does anyone else's cat get shots? Is there a different approach for maintaining Megacolon without shots? The only info I get from our current vet is shots with the W/D Diet or surgery, so that is all I can get out of them.

Glad Kattie is doing so well! I loved reading her story and everyone else's comments.

Thanks,
anniekitty2000
post #15 of 137
Hello and welcome to the forum. I've never heard of using steroids to treat megacolon before. Usually vets turn to cisapride, a motility drug.

Absolutely Baylor should be on an all canned diet, with as low carb and as low fiber as possible.

I would opt for surgery in a 5.5 year old cat if he was otherwise healthy. 10 or 12 years is a long time to take laxatives, and as time goes on the doses of the laxatives have to be continually increased. As would the cisapride, if he was to start taking that. I have a special dislike for lactulose.

I would do the surgery now while he's strong, not wait until he's older and less able to withstand it.
post #16 of 137
Quote:
Baylor is 5.5 and has been diagnosed with Megacolon
How did this vet diagnose Baylor with Megacolon? Did he take an xray? Was the colon really enlarged?

Quote:
He has received a steroid shot every 8 weeks for a little over a year
Why is the vet giving Baylor steroids to treat Megacolon? In all my research and hearing from other people regarding feline megacolon I have never heard a cat put on steroids to treat megacolon. This is really sad to hear. Steroids is not something to just throw around. It suppresses the immune system and can cause other problems on top of the megacolon.


Quote:
and has been on the Hills Prescription W/D dry cat food. I would like the intervals in between shots to be longer, but around 8 weeks is when he backs up again, starts vomiting, and needs some relief.
This diet is VERY high in fibre. Many vets will prescribe this because the old school way of thinking for treating megacolon is a high fibre diet. Granted this may work for some cats but many do not do well on a high fibre diet. A lower fibre, grain free, wet food diet is best. It sounds like Baylor does not do well on a high fibre diet as well. I look for canned food that has a MAX fibre content of 1.5%. Anything higher and my cat blocks.


Quote:
However, I would really like him off this steriod shot. He has been monitored with labwork to ensure his body is fine after a year of the shots and everything on the labs was fine and within the ranges, but I still am not a fan.
If the only reason he is on it is for Megacolon then get him off the steroids. You are in control of your cats health. This vet does not sound like he is very versed in Megacolon. When a cat has megacolon this means their colon muscles are not working properly to push the stool out. So, this is usually helped by giving the cat a motility drug called Cisapride. The Cisapride helps contract the muscles to push the stool out. Usually megacolon cats also have harder drier stools and require a stool softner alongside the Cisapride. Miralax is a wonderful stool softner. Lactulose is a stool softner as well but I have had much better success with the Miralax. Miralax is a odourless/tastelss powder you can add to the cats canned food to eat.

Quote:
The only info I get from our current vet is shots with the W/D Diet or surgery, so that is all I can get out of them.
Not uncommon for a vet to be so clueless on how to treat megacolon.

There is a group on yahoo that deals strictly with constipation/feline megacolon. It may be a good idea for you to join this group for some support on getting Baylor to poop on a regular basis without blocking every 8 weeks.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline_Megacolon/
post #17 of 137
Thread Starter 
Well I found this old post on Kattie and thought it was neat if others can help there kitties from my experiences. Well as this post started, Kattie was a chronic constipation, opstipation kitty that my boss eventually diagnosed with beginning megacolon. We treated her with w/d and the problem worsened with the bad food. I researched megacolon a bit as the dr scared me with saying surgery was her last resort. Well I got him to try lactulose on her and a low fiber diet which I tried ca natural to start. That worked for a while, but she still got constipated and needed more lactulose.
Well after taking her home with me last May, I finally had complete control over her diet and medications. I did switch her diet to a mix of a grain free and grain in food. Currently, I use wellness and blue wilderness, with the occasional orijen or Acana thrown in. I also feed a lot of canned twice a day and the kibble is really only a small amount of the diet. I also started miralax, the wonder drug. I started out giving it twice daily, and that gave her runny stools, but not constipated so that was good. I went down to once a day, and as of the last few months I have been giving it every other day, to every few days. I monitor the litterbox and if ther is no stool for more than a day, I give her miralax. She has not been constipated since October of 2009. I almost want to say that her megacolon is cured or lessened. Her coat looks amazing on the new diet and if we stay away from duck, her allergies are nonexistent. I think it is amazing what diet can do, and I will never feed science diet crap unless absolutely necessary which I hope is never. Wd was the worse thing for her. Being a vet tech, it makes me shudder when I half to sell these foods. I know they have their place in certain disease management scenarios, but they really are low quality foods. Yes I went to those awful hills seminars where they try to get the vet community to swallow their marketing campaign lol. That is for another post.
post #18 of 137
Hi Becky, thanks for the update on Kattie. Wow, has it really been that long already. I remember wondering what on earth a vet would prescribe w/d for a constipated cat for.

I'm really glad Kattie is doing so well with the canned low fiber mostly grain free diet and miralax when needed. This is a very inspiring story!
post #19 of 137
Thread Starter 
Yeah I'm amazed at how well she is doing too. The doctor I worked for was pretty old school, but still a good doctor. The high fiber diets were how they treated the issue in the past. I just researched and played around a bit with the protocols. I believe that her case is pretty mild so a cat that has a more severe issue wouldn't be able to do this. As of lately she gets the miralax about 2 times a week, although I upped it a little as she is grooming a lot and getting hairballs. That sucks because I can't put her on the hairball diets because they are higher fiber. We are doing miralax and petromalt and it is under contol.
post #20 of 137

Hello! Our cat (6 years old) was diagnosed with megacolon 3 years ago. We went through a tough time of trial and error with many products. I can say that now for about a year she is at a healthy weight and going regularly. The life saver (literally) is a prescription formula through the vet call Royal Canin veterinary diet Gastro Intestinal Fiber response. We mix it into a small amount of wet food with water

( always trying to add liquids!) We also use 5mg cisapride twice a day, about a 1/2 teaspoon of vaseline mixed in with wet food once a day, and 100ml IV fluid once every three days. Sounds like a lot, but worth it. Our cat is doing great, only needed one enema in the past 12 months. Good luck. Leslie

post #21 of 137

I was researching for my grandmothers cat "Pretty Boy" and came across your conversation. Pretty Boy has a megacolon and was "put out and dug out" two days in a row. Anyways he was put on the W/D fromula from the vets and I also dont agree with those foods. Ive been researching and I've found that some cats don't react well to high fiber especially since that canned food is 10.6% way to high!

Anyways Ive also found that eliminating grains in animals food just makes them look and aids with digestion and eliminating. I feed my canine lab 40 lbs Taste of the Wild dry free choice and Blue Buffalo wet 1 can total daily. She had digestive sensitivity so This has been the only cure. Im thinking that a grain free and low on fiber is going to be fine for my grndmals cat. Ive heard that fiber makes the stool bigger, but helps push it through digestive tract, but i feel that smaller stool pieces is better, especially because if you increase fiber you have to watch the water intake to make sure they are getting enough. I saw the post where you bought "katty" California naturals. I work at a boarding pet resort and we feed high end foods. The california naturals is very very rich and my bosses dobermans couldn't take it, they were gassy and had gas cramps. Dont get a rich food because it is only going to hurt your kitty. Also i saw you bought both "dry and wet" if the cat has a megacolon I would suggest canned food only, no dry. They NEED moisture to push it out. No dry is also what the vet told us but ive been researching and most people are saying no dry! Ive also heard that  chicken broth helps too. and canned pumpkin

 

post #22 of 137

steroid shots can decrease your cats longevity, as it weakens their immune system

post #23 of 137

Hi... My cat Steve has megacolon and he is now on MediCal Fibre Response.  I would have to say that his diagnosis was really bad before I tried the MediCal Fibre Response and since he's been on it, he has done so well.. No more constipation.  Completely gone.  I recommend this food to any dog or cat. 

Sylvia

post #24 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by SylviaB View Post

Hi... My cat Steve has megacolon and he is now on MediCal Fibre Response.  I would have to say that his diagnosis was really bad before I tried the MediCal Fibre Response and since he's been on it, he has done so well.. No more constipation.  Completely gone.  I recommend this food to any dog or cat. 
Sylvia

Hi Sylvia, and welcome to TCS! I'm glad this seems to have given your kitty some relief, but I have to warn you the relief is likely to be short lived. Megacolon cannot be managed on a dry grain heavy high fiber diet. I urge you to rethink this food. Dry food and adding extra bulk fiber are two of the worst things you can give a cat with megacolon.

How was your cat diagnosed? Did your vet take an x ray?

Cats, any cat, all cats, need to be on a moisture rich (as in canned food) diet, low fiber. As obligate carnivores, they are not meant to have a diet high in bulk forming fiber. That is how their bodies are made. Here is some reading to help you understand why

www.catinfo.org


Grain heavy foods and bulk forming fibers such as psyllium can make megacolon worse. This is because the fiber works by drawing moisture to the colon. ALL moisture. Which causes the kitty to be dehydrated and causes the stool to become huge. Cats do not normally have large poops. When poop that is mixed with something like psyllium sits in the colon sucking up all the moisture in the cat, the stool gets too large, making it difficult to pass. This also stretches the colon, and creates the megacolon.

Here is a great site on cats and constipation.

http://www.felineconstipation.org/index.html
post #25 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by SylviaB View Post

Hi... My cat Steve has megacolon and he is now on MediCal Fibre Response.  I would have to say that his diagnosis was really bad before I tried the MediCal Fibre Response and since he's been on it, he has done so well.. No more constipation.  Completely gone.  I recommend this food to any dog or cat. 
Sylvia
I tried this too for my cat (don't know if you mean the kibble as there is a wet formula too). It worked for about 8 months and then he started getting constipated again, with blood. I'm now switching him to an all wet (high quality diet)... we are getting there!
post #26 of 137
Hello,

My one year old baby cat Widdles has recently been diagnosed with Mega Colon. In addition, he has a spinal condition, which I believe to be congenital( found him at 1 week-old) and so he can not use his hind legs. I believe his spinal condition plays a role in his diagnosis of mega colon, but without an MRI, I am not sure.

Anyway, my baby is currently on 1.5-2mls of lactulose every 8-12 hours, depending on stool consistency. He practically NEVER drinks water on his own, so I have been making sure to add water to his canned food and add tuba juice/olive oil to water in between meals. I picked up cisparide, but have not started it, because that is my last option if all else fails.

I've been to 2 different vets in the process of his manual extractions( anesthesia/enema) and also a neurologist. They all are consistent in that they have him on prescription diet r/d and lactulose... I've read many good things about low fiber diet and miralax, but the vets don't seem to agree. Currently, my baby is producing BMs daily but the past few days, they seem to be firmer and in larger (ball-shaped) pieces. I am confused because I am thinking that maybe it's because if the high fiber diet and that I should switch to low fiber, but u noticed his stools got harder since I ran out of canned pumpkin and had to put him on w/d( a lower fiber food than r/d) until I picked up more r/d.... Please help!

Thank you,
Cari
post #27 of 137

The only 2cents.gif, I can add to the thread, is as follows: if, the cat will eat wet food, whatever, brand that might be, add, as much water as possible to the food. Ideally, you want to do 50% food to 50% water. So, if, your cat eats, 2 oz at a time, try adding 2 oz of water. If, the cat will not do that, try, adding 1oz to 2 oz of food. Lastly, Predinzone, as directed by a licensed veterinarian, can ber very helpful.

 

The information, provided above, was, based on my one cat, that, had mega colon.
 

post #28 of 137

Hi, Widdles47 and everyone!  I am new to post, but Widdles, I am in much the same boat as you.  I have a 1 y/o, Jo Gizmo,  that has been constipated really since being weaned.  She has had several enemas in the last 3 months.  We  tried w/d to start to no avail.  We have tried i/d, but she doesn't much like it, which is fine with me.  It contains wheat, and I am gluten intolerant.  (For those unfamiliar, it is an intolerance to a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and oats).  No, I'm not going to eat the food myself, but I do need to handle it, and she licks me.  So, that poses a risk for me, as well.  No more i/d!  Tried pumpkin.  Turned her nose up at it.  Currently she is eating PetSmart Authority brand dry and wet food.  It's probably not the best, but it doesn't contain wheat, at least not the varieties I choose.  (more on that below)  I have discovered by experimentation that a combination of the wet and dry seems optimal for her.  It's almost as if the wet food alone is harder for her to eliminate.  (more on that below, too)

 

She has been on lactulose for many, many months, since before being spayed at 6 months.  It worked at first but has not been working as well or at all for a couple of months now.  She has been most recently on 2.5 ml 3 times a day.  I have also discovered, and her vet confirmed, that lactulose is associated with hypercalcemia (elevated blood calcium levels) in some cats.  I just recently learned that her calcium levels were a bit "off" when she was spayed, but nobody ever told me.  Last week I had all blood work checked, and again her calcium level was elevated.  Fortunately, she as been taken off the lactulose, at the advice of her vet.  We are trying Miralax for now.  I am also going to try an herbal laxative from PetWellBeing.com.  It is supposed to increase motility, which I am certain that Jo Gizmo needs, and I would rather try that first than Cisapride, which comes with possible cardiac side effects.  

 

Widdles, as your little baby seems to have, poor Jo Gizmo seems to have some sort of spinal affliction.  She has use of her back legs, but she has never been as agile as a young cat should be.  She is not capable of jumping up on the counter (no complaints here!), and she has always seemed be a little "slow."  She definitely has kitten-like moments but only when she is feeling really good.  

 

As an aside, Jo Gizmo has also recently been diagnosed with an ascending urinary tract infection, probably due to inability to clean her hind area properly during difficult bowel times and my inability to detect the difference between pain/discomfort associated with bowel difficulty and urinary difficulty until blood showed up in her urine.  Ugh!  

 

Annnnyway, it seems that Jo Gizmo's real difficulty may stem from not having the muscle tone to eliminate her stool, hence the probable need for motility drugs (or herbs).  BUT... before I try any more drugs, I have been contemplating a raw diet for her, and I have been doing research and ran across this thread.  I was wanting some confirmation of my suspicions that part of it was probably just inadequate food pushed on us by the manufacturers/vets, and this post, in addition to some other sites, gives me all the confidence I need.  I am going to try a homemade raw food diet for little Jo.  It would be easier for me if I could try some of the higher quality commercial foods mentioned earlier in this post, but alas, they contain barley.  So, I'm off to grind some chicken. rryumy.gif

 

Any input from all you veterans is appreciated, and Widdles, I wish you luck with your little one!  I will try to keep an update going.  

post #29 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by batgirl View Post

Hi, Widdles47 and everyone!  I am new to post, but Widdles, I am in much the same boat as you.  I have a 1 y/o, Jo Gizmo,  that has been constipated really since being weaned.  She has had several enemas in the last 3 months.  We  tried w/d to start to no avail.  We have tried i/d, but she doesn't much like it, which is fine with me.  It contains wheat, and I am gluten intolerant.  (For those unfamiliar, it is an intolerance to a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and oats).  No, I'm not going to eat the food myself, but I do need to handle it, and she licks me.  So, that poses a risk for me, as well.  No more i/d!  Tried pumpkin.  Turned her nose up at it.  Currently she is eating PetSmart Authority brand dry and wet food.  It's probably not the best, but it doesn't contain wheat, at least not the varieties I choose.  (more on that below)  I have discovered by experimentation that a combination of the wet and dry seems optimal for her.  It's almost as if the wet food alone is harder for her to eliminate.  (more on that below, too)

She has been on lactulose for many, many months, since before being spayed at 6 months.  It worked at first but has not been working as well or at all for a couple of months now.  She has been most recently on 2.5 ml 3 times a day.  I have also discovered, and her vet confirmed, that lactulose is associated with hypercalcemia (elevated blood calcium levels) in some cats.  I just recently learned that her calcium levels were a bit "off" when she was spayed, but nobody ever told me.  Last week I had all blood work checked, and again her calcium level was elevated.  Fortunately, she as been taken off the lactulose, at the advice of her vet.  We are trying Miralax for now.  I am also going to try an herbal laxative from PetWellBeing.com.  It is supposed to increase motility, which I am certain that Jo Gizmo needs, and I would rather try that first than Cisapride, which comes with possible cardiac side effects.  

Widdles, as your little baby seems to have, poor Jo Gizmo seems to have some sort of spinal affliction.  She has use of her back legs, but she has never been as agile as a young cat should be.  She is not capable of jumping up on the counter (no complaints here!), and she has always seemed be a little "slow."  She definitely has kitten-like moments but only when she is feeling really good.  

As an aside, Jo Gizmo has also recently been diagnosed with an ascending urinary tract infection, probably due to inability to clean her hind area properly during difficult bowel times and my inability to detect the difference between pain/discomfort associated with bowel difficulty and urinary difficulty until blood showed up in her urine.  Ugh!  

Annnnyway, it seems that Jo Gizmo's real difficulty may stem from not having the muscle tone to eliminate her stool, hence the probable need for motility drugs (or herbs).  BUT... before I try any more drugs, I have been contemplating a raw diet for her, and I have been doing research and ran across this thread.  I was wanting some confirmation of my suspicions that part of it was probably just inadequate food pushed on us by the manufacturers/vets, and this post, in addition to some other sites, gives me all the confidence I need.  I am going to try a homemade raw food diet for little Jo.  It would be easier for me if I could try some of the higher quality commercial foods mentioned earlier in this post, but alas, they contain barley.  So, I'm off to grind some chicken. rryumy.gif

Any input from all you veterans is appreciated, and Widdles, I wish you luck with your little one!  I will try to keep an update going.  

Welcome to TCS! wavey.gif It's great to meet you! wink.gif
post #30 of 137

My cat Bigboy is going through this currently. He had a case of it a year ago, but the vet just said he had constipation. He lost a lot of weight in the last month, when I took him to a vet, he was in liver failure. They tried to free up the obstipation, this cost me $1000 for med's and 3 days hospitalization. They sent me to a specialist, he has been there for 4 days. They put an easphogeal feeding tube today and they tried to deobstapate him but only could a little. Tomorrow they are going to try again. They are telling me they would have to give him medication that cause diarrhea in order for this not to happen again. IF he has to have the surgery it would be another $3000. I have paid them $2500 already. They also told me that if there is nerve damage to the colon it would creep up the rest of the colon even if he has the surgery. He is a very special cat to me, he 5 years old. Yes I do have 5 other cats, but none like him. I have paid out more money on him than myself. I had cancer last year and still have bills from it. I have taken money out of my IRA to pay this. When do you stop I love him so much. I wish he had died in his sleep one night than me having to go through all of this. Any help would be appreciated!

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