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Calvin lost his voice, literally

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Calvin is 4 years old, and neutered. He is an inside cat. He is prone to hairballs, and is long haired. Since he has been on Science Diet Hairball formula, he has done quite well. No throwing up, no gagging. He still fights when I try to brush him though. I am thinking about keeping him permanently shaved down as a result. Twice a year lion's cut.

History:

He has been on science diet, but now without a fight. I tried authority hairball. While on it, he had some vicious barf cycles going on. Very loud, very intense, and twice, I thought he was going to cough up a lung.

He went back on science diet promptly, but not without a casualty. He no longer was a screamer. It seems the barfing and gagging strained his chords. That was about 3 weeks ago. I noticed his voice just not being the same about two weeks ago.

Calvin is very vocal. He is a screamer or was... lately he has not had a voice. He only lets out a slight crackled whisper. He eats is kibble and shredded wet food as before. Drinks his water. and goes potty, 1 and 2 just fine.

He just lost his voice. I searched a lot and was dismayed that sometimes vets may not know the cause. I say this because since he is not sneezing nor does he have a runny nose, nor does he appear lethargic, I am not financially equipped to go to the vet, just for them to say they don't know.

I can't afford tests/xrays.

If he is drinking and swallowing, wouldn't it be impossible for him to be impacted by a hairball or such.?

He was just such a loud, screaming kitty.

I know I will be told to see a vet and that is fine, I just wanted feedback. If this continues, I will go that route. Just throwing out feelers.

Thank you.
post #2 of 13
Peaches & my sister's cat Jedi both have the same problem where they can physcially meow. They both sort of "trill" but I have NEVER heard of a cat loosing their voice!

I hope you find out what is going on!

Maybe he just strained his voice?
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
That's just the thing. Since I have had him, his vocabulary has been vast. He would coo, whisper, scream, gurgle, trill, and chirp [at birds]. now just a very strained squawk. sometimes an airy whisper. I know I hate doctors myself and the "hmmm, let's try this approach" but at least I know to go get something for pain. Calvin doesn't. And I don't know if he is in pain, [though he still eats like a horse...] I guess I will go to the inexpensive vet on the northeast side of town, and hope they don't have an influx of dogs that day [I am just nervous around canines...] I know they won't know and I will be mad, but...
post #4 of 13
One of my RB kitties Simon suddenly lost his voice one day. I rushed him to the vet and they found nothing wrong (that they could see) and miraculously, he regained his voice on the way home from the vet, as he cried all the way.
I never did find out what, if anything, happened. I suspect he was just messing with my mind.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by clpeters23 View Post
One of my RB kitties Simon suddenly lost his voice one day. I rushed him to the vet and they found nothing wrong (that they could see) and miraculously, he regained his voice on the way home from the vet, as he cried all the way home.


Tricky Cat!!

If he's eating/drinking/pooping properly nothing can really be that wrong.
post #6 of 13
Dorabella's mom, something from the info below will apply. Getting treatment for Calvin won't cost an arm and a leg, so don't be afraid to call your vet.

Could you possibly feed only wet food for a few days? With an irritated and most likely inflamed throat, this would be very helpful.

http://www.familyvet.com/Cats/Resp.html

Quote:
LARYNGITIS

Trauma to the larynx, viral/bacterial infections, heat stroke, excitement and excessive howling can all lead to inflammation and swelling of the larynx. Clinical signs include a change in the voice (hoarse meow), cough, soreness to the throat, trouble swallowing, trouble breathing including gurgling or a noisy respiration. Diagnosis is based on history and clinical signs.

TREATMENT OF LARYNGITIS

Most cats with laryngitis are easily treated with the proper medications. Cats that are easily excited or constant howlers will often have recurrent episodes of laryngitis. Injections of cortisone, cough suppressants, tranquilizers and ice packs applied to the throat are all effective. Antibiotics may be needed in cases of infection.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post
Dorabella's mom, something from the info below will apply. Getting treatment for Calvin won't cost an arm and a leg, so don't be afraid to call your vet.

Could you possibly feed only wet food for a few days? With an irritated and most likely inflamed throat, this would be very helpful.

http://www.familyvet.com/Cats/Resp.html
Thank you. Calvin only drinks the juice from wet food. He eats the kibble heartily. I would not want to stop feeding as he is just not a fan of wet. Even once, I offered the meow mix cups, with the strong tuna smell, in the form of beef, chicken, and once a tuna flavor, and still, he only drank the juice.

Thank you so much for this info!!!!!
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dorabella's mom View Post
Thank you. Calvin only drinks the juice from wet food. He eats the kibble heartily. I would not want to stop feeding as he is just not a fan of wet. Even once, I offered the meow mix cups, with the strong tuna smell, in the form of beef, chicken, and once a tuna flavor, and still, he only drank the juice.

Thank you so much for this info!!!!!
maybe you could add warm water and mush the wet food into a "soup" consistency that he might be willing to eat. I did that with one of my cats that was sick and didn't eat much.
post #9 of 13
My Siamese mix is very vocal and she loses her voice occasionally. It's almost like she gets laryngitis. I've never taken her to the vet for it, because with her it clears up rather quickly. She is over 20 years old, and I think sometimes she just "talks" until she gets hoarse.
post #10 of 13
A few weeks ago, when Wellington went missing for two days and came home injured (possibly from being caught in a snare or on a fence) he lost his voice for a week. I was quite scared as he is also very vocal and expressive. The vet said it was probably trauma, or he had strained his voice meowing for help, and he would recover, and he did, but it started off quite gently for a few days before he regained his full range of expressions. I was so glad my boy was talking to me again.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dorabella's mom View Post
He went back on science diet promptly, but not without a casualty. He no longer was a screamer. It seems the barfing and gagging strained his chords. That was about 3 weeks ago. I noticed his voice just not being the same about two weeks ago.
I think you may have answered your own question, perhaps? You could be onto something there. Have you ever had a vomit fit from a bad flu or a night out drinking that left you reeling in the bathroom, and noticed your own throat hurting and your own voice a little shell-shocked? That could be all it is. could be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clpeters23 View Post
One of my RB kitties Simon suddenly lost his voice one day. I rushed him to the vet and they found nothing wrong (that they could see) and miraculously, he regained his voice on the way home from the vet, as he cried all the way.
Maybe you could try putting Calvin into a crate and toting him out to the car for a quick spin around the block? LOL
I'd give him a few more days to regain his voice on his own (check that he is not in pain, and that he is breathing fine, check often)... and then try the crate/car ride test, if you felt so inclined.

My cats are all "chatty", so if one lost his/her voice in this same manner, with no other symptoms, I, personally, wouldn't hesitate to try the "crate test". LOL
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Calvin's voice started coming back sunday and is pretty strong today. Thanks, Everyone :^)
post #13 of 13
Glad Calvin's voice is better.

I wanted to add my Almond loses his voice often now. His voice has not the same period compared to his younger days. He is fourteen. He never was a big screecher. He does he share of meows though. Nothing seemed to trigger his voice changing other then old age I had thought. It's been like this for the last year with no other signs of health issues except for walking a bit slower.
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