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Longhair cat "clingons"

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
My boyfriend and I have two five-month old flamepoint Himalayan kittens - both male, and brothers. They are healthy, fun, and generally well-behaved (aside from the usual kitten mischieviousness!). We're having a problem, however, with one of them: there isn't really a way to put it that isn't gross, but he's having pieces of poo stick to the fur at his back end. I have to give him a bath to get it all off if we notice it when it's still fresh (ew) and it's really unpleasant for the cat as well as for us. The cat himself seems to realize that this is a problem and attempts to remove the clingons on his own - often creating "scoot" marks on the rug and tile that add to the smell and grossness of the issue.

He always goes to the bathroom in his catbox and obviously doesn't intentionally leave his fur unclean - and does his best to remove it. However, it is kind of unsettling for us to not know where we might have missed a scoot mark, go through the hassle of cleaning him, etc. Does anyone have experience with this or ideas on how to prevent it?
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bb_scallop View Post
My boyfriend and I have two five-month old flamepoint Himalayan kittens - both male, and brothers. They are healthy, fun, and generally well-behaved (aside from the usual kitten mischieviousness!). We're having a problem, however, with one of them: there isn't really a way to put it that isn't gross, but he's having pieces of poo stick to the fur at his back end. I have to give him a bath to get it all off if we notice it when it's still fresh (ew) and it's really unpleasant for the cat as well as for us. The cat himself seems to realize that this is a problem and attempts to remove the clingons on his own - often creating "scoot" marks on the rug and tile that add to the smell and grossness of the issue.

He always goes to the bathroom in his catbox and obviously doesn't intentionally leave his fur unclean - and does his best to remove it. However, it is kind of unsettling for us to not know where we might have missed a scoot mark, go through the hassle of cleaning him, etc. Does anyone have experience with this or ideas on how to prevent it?
Well - did this just start happening? Did your boyfriend just get him? Did the kitten just have his food changed? What is he eating?
It seems to me his has soft stools for some reason, and that's the first thing that should be addressed IMO...
A vet visit could be in order to check for parasites also, but I will wait for your answers first...
Normal, firm poop will not stick on his fur like that. You can go to Petsmart and get him some Bene-bac for the moment, or give him some canned pumpkin (plain, NOT filliing), just 1/2 tsp, mixed with his wet food. But the underlying reason for this will need to be addressed...
post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
Normal, firm poop will not stick on his fur like that.
It can if you have a cat that's too dumb to lift its butt high enough - I have one that manage to poop on his tail a couple of days ago and get a piece of well formed solid poop stuck. I wonder if he didn't have his tail under him this time.

Go ahead and rule out health problems, but while at the vet you may want to ask them about trimming the fur back there. It can help with some long haired cats to have this done.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
It can if you have a cat that's too dumb to lift its butt high enough - I have one that manage to poop on his tail a couple of days ago and get a piece of well formed solid poop stuck. I wonder if he didn't have his tail under him this time.

Go ahead and rule out health problems, but while at the vet you may want to ask them about trimming the fur back there. It can help with some long haired cats to have this done.
True, It can, and it does from time to time, but it's not the norm, so... since this is a kitten, IMO more information is needed here... For what she is saying, it seem this is a regular thing which it is not normal...
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
True, It can, and it does from time to time, but it's not the norm, so... since this is a kitten, IMO more information is needed here... For what she is saying, it seem this is a regular thing which it is not normal...
I agree, more info is needed. Sherman did have soft stools at one point - and soft stools + fluffy butts is a terrible combination! A diet change fixed his issues.

Do you have to get your kitties trimmed at all? It was actually a person with ragdolls on here that recommended it to me for Sherman - calling it a "hygienic cut", my vet and the groomer there calls it "butt trim" and "potty track" trim. It helps with all of the fur around his butt, but does nothing for the tail he doesn't lift.

I still recommend the OP ask the vet about that, too. If the kitten has something causing soft stools that needed to be treated with a course of medication or slow transition onto a different food it can make cleanup of break through loose stools easier in the meantime. If there's a parasite or bacteria responsible, that could make things safer for the people in the home.
post #6 of 21
I have two longhairs that get a "sanitary shave" around that area. Makes easier cleanup for them. But, they have formed stools, so I agree with the others that the soft stool issue needs to be addressed first.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Do you have to get your kitties trimmed at all? It was actually a person with ragdolls on here that recommended it to me for Sherman - calling it a "hygienic cut", my vet and the groomer there calls it "butt trim" and "potty track" trim. It helps with all of the fur around his butt, but does nothing for the tail he doesn't lift.
Haven't done yet... I have thought about it doing it for Bugsy, but I am not sure.... (I am pretty sure IBD, controlled) Bugsy is even worst 'cause he is too fat, so he can not groom himself properly... It is not too bad though... I wonder if I should do it? Have you done it??? Poor baby - will he look ridiculous?
post #8 of 21
^The groomer I had do it didn't take it too close to the skin. It looked a bit goofy but it was better than poopy butt in my face at 3am. It looks better growing out...


Another suggestion to the OP while dealing with soft stools: make sure the litter box you're using is large enough for your cat to completely turn around in. Even with formed stools some cats can be clumsy, or the other cat come along and step in a half buried stool before you can scoop it out.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
Well - did this just start happening? Did your boyfriend just get him? Did the kitten just have his food changed? What is he eating?
It seems to me his has soft stools for some reason, and that's the first thing that should be addressed IMO...
A vet visit could be in order to check for parasites also, but I will wait for your answers first...
We've actually had the kittens since June, as soon as they were old enough to leave their mom - my boyfriend's mom bred them, so we know where they came from, reputable home, etc.

As far as whether it just started happening: it happened once with both kittens when they were really little (probably 10 weeks), but with one of them it hasn't happened since then. With the other, it has continued not as an everyday occurence or anything, but probably every three weeks or so.

They eat Science Diet kitten food (usually just the dry, with some canned food once in a while) and have eaten that way since they started eating solid food - no changes.

To the person who said the litterbox might not be big enough: I'm thinking this might be a problem. As they're growing, the boxes definitely are getting smaller for them and I can see that being a possible problem.
post #10 of 21
I would change the diet - personally, but slowly of course. IMO that food is not totally suitable for growing Persian kittens.
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bb_scallop View Post
To the person who said the litterbox might not be big enough: I'm thinking this might be a problem. As they're growing, the boxes definitely are getting smaller for them and I can see that being a possible problem.
It could help. If you can't find a conventional litter box thats large enough, you can do what many of us have and use storage bins.

I agree about the food. Since it's a long standing problem in just one of the kittens it could be one of the ingredients in the SC that he can't handle. Some cats have problems early on with foods and others can develop a sensitivity/allergy even to a food they've been eating for years. Much like people can develop allergies from repeated exposures.

Take your time browsing through the nutrition section. There's a lot of discussions about various foods, wet vs. dry, price comparisons and so on.
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thank you for the suggestions about the food! I did browse through the nutrition forum and we are most likely going to start a gradual food change. I'm trying not to feel too badly about feeding them that food for this long.

I was able to trim my cat's hair a little bit and it hasn't happened since then, so we'll see - we're going to also buy the bigger litterboxes (he's a big boy, already 7 pounds!), so that plus the diet change will hopefully all combine to form a resolution!
post #13 of 21
Don't feel bad. Everyone has to start somewhere and learn.

I'm glad you're going to try some of the ideas to help control this and are going to work on it! Good luck!
post #14 of 21
Yeah I agree, don't feel bad. I fed science diet for 2 years and IMO it wasn't a bad food, just not good for my kitties tummies.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
Do you have to get your kitties trimmed at all? It was actually a person with ragdolls on here that recommended it to me for Sherman - calling it a "hygienic cut", my vet and the groomer there calls it "butt trim" and "potty track" trim. It helps with all of the fur around his butt, but does nothing for the tail he doesn't lift.
My mom & I have Ragdolls, and I keep them shaved back there

We struggled (well, the cats did) with loose stools for a good year with both of them, til we switched to a Hairball formula food (Authority Hairball), which firmed them both right up within days, and has worked since. Not the best quality, but I tried numerous other high quality brands and none agreed with them, so on the Authority they stay!

I still keep them shaved back there though. I do it about.. once a month maybe, using my horse clippers with a #10 blade. I don't go down to the skin or anything, but it's enough to keep everything tidy. Works for us!
post #16 of 21
1st don't feel bad for the science diet. I know people that insist that cat chow is good food. Now it does meet minimum standards, but for some of us "Minimum" isn't enough for our babies. The food switch can bee a process, but I'm sure you will find all the help you need here.

As far as the hinder problem. My Isaac is 5 & I can always tell when he needs a sanitary as he starts leaving what I like to call "treats" around the house for me. It does look funny when they shave down short, but I prefer it as I know it is distressing to him, the other cats & myself when pieces of poo end up on the carpet. He won't let me do it, so the vet techs take care of it for me, but he doesn't seem to mind the shave down.
post #17 of 21
I have a 8.5 yr old cat who is overweight and is on a diet (NO KIBBLE THE VET SAID) and he's had the culotte cut to shave his butt, rear flanks and tail but for one month he is dragging poop around anyway. I have taken to putting him in the tub and use my flexible shower hose to hose him down and it's getting tiresome and he is heavy! I am so frustrated, don't know what to do. He only started this about 6 wks. ago. Any suggestions? I am going through Nature's Miracle bottles every 2 wks. running around cleaning carpets where he drops poop! HELP! If something doesn't happen, I will have to have him put away, sadly, but I can't live like this!
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by soxiesmom View Post
I have a 8.5 yr old cat who is overweight and is on a diet (NO KIBBLE THE VET SAID) and he's had the culotte cut to shave his butt, rear flanks and tail but for one month he is dragging poop around anyway. I have taken to putting him in the tub and use my flexible shower hose to hose him down and it's getting tiresome and he is heavy! I am so frustrated, don't know what to do. He only started this about 6 wks. ago. Any suggestions? I am going through Nature's Miracle bottles every 2 wks. running around cleaning carpets where he drops poop! HELP! If something doesn't happen, I will have to have him put away, sadly, but I can't live like this!
There is definitely something wrong with your poor cat, and he needs vet attention... What is he eating? You say he is on a diet, and this started 6 weeks ago... If this started when you changed the food, then the food you are giving is not agreeing with him and needs to be replaced... Please do not give up on your cat because of a possible food intolerance
post #19 of 21
I had this same exact problem with my persian/siamese mix. I had to give him baths often and pick pieces of poo out of his fur and finally just shaved his bum area and have not had a problem since. His stool was normal - not soft or runny but it would just get stuck in the hair (because there is so much hair back there)
post #20 of 21
I had a long haired cat for nineteen years and rarely had this problem. But when I did it was usually diet related because the poop is too loose. I would also shave the pants a bit to keep her short. There is a great supplement by Honest Kitchen called Perfect Form. It has all natural ingredients including pumpkin. I use put it in Pipsqueak's food and it really helps keep stools firm. Also, switching to grain-free, I tried a few, and Wellness Core seems to be the best for Pipsqueak and my other cats are doing well on it so far too.
post #21 of 21
I agree that the problem could be diet related. I found out after a LOT of poopy mess that my kitty can NOT eat wet food. Any brand... without it making his tummy sick. I have put him on 100% dry for now - and his stool is MUCH better.

I also have his bum shaved once a month - I take him to the groomer and they run the razer up the back of his legs, his bum and I have them ALSO do the underside base of his tail. Our "issues" are now manageable. Once in a while I have to break out the wetwipes.

I also keep ROUNDED TIP scissors handy - from the womens area of the dept store meant to trim brows/nose hair etc.... and when he has poop in his fur I clip it out. This makes the battle pretty much non existent. He hates wetwipes on his fur but will let me trim away poopy fur with no problems. Wetwipes are reserved for wiping on the actual anus.

We are much happier.

PLEASE don't put your cat down over poopy bum issues... try some of the suggestions here regarding change the food and how to do it slowly so there are no tummy issues. If you decide you do not want your cat PLEASE take him to a no kill shelter so he may be adopted by someone who doesn't mind taking care of his little bum issues.

PERSONALLY I would never trade my Kismet in for all the money in the world, poopy bum or not. I love him. I am just glad he is getting better with the clean ups

EVERY time he goes to litter and is done I call out "Lets check your bum!" and he comes trotting over to me so I can check if he needs a cleanup. It works for us.
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