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Urinary Health/Acidified Foods & "Senior"/CRF Cats

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I've read that urinary health/acidified foods are not good for CRF cats, and older cats in general.

So, why is the acidity bad?

Which nutrition facts (protein, fat, phosphorus, magnesium, etc) and ingredients differ between Urinary Health and Kidney Support/Senior foods? (Dry foods)

Which nutrition values and ingredients are the same?

Can there be a happy medium - a food suitable for an older, maybe kidney problem cat that is also suitable for urinary health/crystals? (Again, dry foods). What would the nutrition info and ingredients look like?

Thank you!
post #2 of 12
I used Max senior by nutro for 18 months after( about 1 yrs prior ) crf diagnosis.... it matched both UTI friendly and senior/ crf guidelines...

Cranberrys are not great for crf cats

look into this supplement or glucosimne and chondrotin .. www.trixsyn.com
post #3 of 12
MissKalamata, just curious - have you had any luck with your loose stool issues?
post #4 of 12
I don't mean to appear dumb, but what is a CRF cat?
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoe2009 View Post
I don't mean to appear dumb, but what is a CRF cat?
chronic renal failure... aka kidney disease or renal cat
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
Cranberrys are not great for crf cats
Why not?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bellatrix
MissKalamata, just curious - have you had any luck with your loose stool issues?
Haven't done the litter boxes in forever (bad on me, I know, but I'm overwhelmed right now). As far as I can tell, nothing's improving. When I get some time I will try acidophilus, but they eat pretty much all dry food so I don't know how I'll mix it in.

I don't mean to be annoying, but I do want my specific questions answered, if possible:
Quote:
So, why is the acidity bad?

Which nutrition facts (protein, fat, phosphorus, magnesium, etc) and ingredients differ between Urinary Health and Kidney Support/Senior foods? (Dry foods)

Which nutrition values and ingredients are the same?

Can there be a happy medium - a food suitable for an older, maybe kidney problem cat that is also suitable for urinary health/crystals? (Again, dry foods). What would the nutrition info and ingredients look like?
For now, I'll look at Nutro Max Senior's nutrition facts and ingredients and try to find other foods that are similar.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissKalamata View Post
Why not?

Haven't done the litter boxes in forever (bad on me, I know, but I'm overwhelmed right now). As far as I can tell, nothing's improving. When I get some time I will try acidophilus, but they eat pretty much all dry food so I don't know how I'll mix it in.

I don't mean to be annoying, but I do want my specific questions answered, if possible:


For now, I'll look at Nutro Max Senior's nutrition facts and ingredients and try to find other foods that are similar.
First of all, you must keep the litter boxes clean. They should be scooped daily, preferably more than once. And dumped and scrubbed once a week.

No one wants to use a dirty bathroom, and a dirty litter box is the cause of many urinary tract problems in cats.

Please keep your cat's boxes clean from now on.

A CRF kitty needs to keep her urine on the low side of acidic because, since the kidneys are not doing their job anymore, there is already a lot of acid in her blood.

The kidneys filter the blood and urine, and if both the urine and blood are highly acidic it makes the kidneys have to work too hard and they just can't keep up.

Having a cat with FLUTD and CRF is a real challenge. As has been mentioned putting her on cosequin for cats can help keep the bladder walls strong and smooth, to help prevent bacteria and crystals from sticking in the bladdder.

She should be on a canned diet, to get as much fluid in her as possible. The food must be low in phosphorus, magnesium and calcium, for both conditions. Reduced sodium would be helpful too, may senior foods are reduced sodium.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by otto
a dirty litter box is the cause of many urinary tract problems in cats.
Is it? How? I've never heard that before, so please explain.

By the way, none of my cats actually have kidney failure. They are just older (8+), and I want to take preventative measures.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissKalamata View Post
Is it? How? I've never heard that before, so please explain.
'Cuz if it's dirty, they won't want to use it, and will hold it longer than they should and......ta da. Urinary problems.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissKalamata View Post
Is it? How? I've never heard that before, so please explain.

By the way, none of my cats actually have kidney failure. They are just older (8+), and I want to take preventative measures.
Well, keeping a clean litter box is a very important step in keeping your cats healthy.

They will avoid using the box, which means holding it too long. They will hold both poop (which can cause constipation and megacolon) and pee (which can cause bladder infections, urinary tract infections and kidney infections. a kidney infection is not the same thing as CRF)

The box is full of bacteria and every time they squat they risk getting bacteria in their urethra and other sensitive areas. It's unsanitary and unhygienic for everyone living in the house.

Cats are fastidious by nature. A dirty litter box can cause stress, and stress can cause illness. Including kidney failure.

I am not trying to be rude, but...would you like to use a filthy toilet full of poop and pee?

And on the kidney failure prevention check list, be sure your cats have healthy teeth and gums. Periodontal disease can also cause kidney disease.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
I suppose that makes sense....

Well, while we're off-topic, I might as well ask some more questions about litter. Do those automatic litter boxes actually work, how high is the price (probably absurdly so), and are they built such that I can scoop the litter myself if I want to? My schedule is such that I am away for days at a time and unable to scoop litter boxes for those days.



After that, back on topic please...can anyone answer my original questions on food?
post #12 of 12
Many conditions such as renal failure or urinary problems are treated with medication and a prescription diet by a vet. Have you asked your vet about specific dietary concerns?

I believe I read that one of your cats had a problem with crystals in the urine before? Did the vet tell you to change the food? Different foods will be suggested according to the type of crystals found in the urine.

The questions you asked about a happy medium food may need to be answered by your vet first. Let everyone know if they need a prescription food or what the vet suggests and then suggestions can be made for a food that might be substituted.

Sorry that's not much help, but with those type health issues it is best to get the vets suggestions for specific needs first.
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