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"Becoming" Allergic

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I would like to hear this from a real cat-lover, how the heck does someone "Become" Allergic to a cat they've had for 5, 8, even 14 years? It's the most common "reason" for giving up a cat in our local classifieds and just s me off to no end!!!!

Just be honest and tell people you're a lazy... ok I'll calm down now... and no longer want to care for your loving but ageing pet? I just want to call these people and scream at them!

Yes, you can legitimately become allergic to something while you pregnant, but last I checked that was a short-term affliction!!

GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
post #2 of 15
Actually, some of the blame is upon those doctors who don't dig deep enought into the causes of allergies and automatically blame the cats and you know how allergies go, if a person is exposed to many different triggers, any one of them can set off an allergy attack because the person is already teetering on the edge.
My sis was even taking allergy shots so she could keep her cats. Then she moved to TN from CA and her allergies got even worse. Fortunately, her new allergist is a real cat lover & told her to try getting rid of the carpeting in her house (helped lots, but she still needed daily meds) and then he said to get the AC ducting cleaned and the filters upgraded - voila! she's allergy free except when mowing the back forty.....none of her 'cure' involved avoiding cats
then my other close friend moved in with a man with cats & her allergies to cats really acted up & she was considering breaking up with him...but they remodeled the kitchen, getting rid of moldy wood paneling & flooring and HER allergies cleared up; again, the solution had nothing to do with the cats.
Sending mega prayers and vibes that those people who truly love their cats are able to find similar solutions to controlling their allergies while keeping their beloved kitties, and rehoming vibes that those kitties who have owners willing to relinquish another member of the family will find better homes with real families
Bless you for your work in providing shelter & comfort to those rejected kitties - how heartbreaking to see the betrayals
post #3 of 15
these people need to take in consideration what we are doing in our house. My mom went to the doctor for reasons unrelated to allergies, but she got a blood test anyway, and it revealed of all things that she was moderately allergic to cats and has to take allergy medication to stay comfortable. Now, we've had Luna for over three years and TC since April. TC stays in Mom's room and for a short period before that it was Mons (who has passed away). We've actually found out from a trip to Home Depot that they have little filters that can be put on top of fans to filter allergies in a specific room. Unfortunately we were there because her fan broke a couple of days after her diagnosis and we now have to buy a new fan. Also, we plan to get rid of the carpet in her room and replace with hardwood or something similar.

Not to mention that she's coming along to the TICA annual cat show with over 340 cats. She may however have friends come pick her up to hang out during show hours. If not, oh well. We will be packing allergy meds.

And to clarify, the cats are staying.
post #4 of 15
Well, strictly speaking, allergies only develop with exposure to the protein in question. So, long exposure to cats could, indeed, result in an allergy.

I have noticed that even I, who has never had any allergies, get affected by certain cats to a small extent.
post #5 of 15
The woman who lives with 13 cats is cat allergic! Not severely, and not to all cats, but if certain ones sleep on my pillow or get too cuddly for too long my eyes will burn and turn red, and I'll have an awful sore throat.

Almost any new cat that comes in will trigger a bad reaction, but after a few weeks I'll start adjusting to it. I sure wouldn't give them up because of it. If it gets bad enough I'll take pills, there are ways around most allergies.
post #6 of 15
My mother developed an allergy to cats after having indoor only cats for 18+ years. The allergy test she took at the allergist's office showed this. Oddly, she doesn't seem to have any allergic reactions to the cats. But she wouldn't get rid of them even if it they did cause an allergic reaction.
post #7 of 15
We have seen any number of adult cats come into the shelter because "my kid is suddenly allergic to the cat." We usually say (to ourselves), "Yeah, and what else is new? Moving? Getting a new dog? Behind on your house payments? Etc.?"

We usually regard the "allergy" excuse as just an excuse.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
We have seen any number of adult cats come into the shelter because "my kid is suddenly allergic to the cat." We usually say (to ourselves), "Yeah, and what else is new? Moving? Getting a new dog? Behind on your house payments? Etc.?"

We usually regard the "allergy" excuse as just an excuse.
As another poster mentioned, a lot of that can be blamed on doctors looking for a handy culprit. How many tests they want to run to determine the actual cause depends on the level of care your insurance will cover.
My 5 year old grandson recently was diagnosed with asthma, and the doctors first words were pet allergies. The boy had not been in my house in over a week when it hit, and has been here for days at a time over the years with no adverse reactions.
Very few people nowadys are going to wonder if maybe the doctor is wrong, they just meekly follow orders and give up the poor cat.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
Well, strictly speaking, allergies only develop with exposure to the protein in question. So, long exposure to cats could, indeed, result in an allergy.
Yep, I used to take certain antibiotics all the time, now I am allergic and will break out in a rash if I take any.
I've heard of surgeons becoming allergic to latex because they use the gloves so often. Or people who have had lots of surgeries.
People definitely can become allergic to things they weren't allergic to before. I'm not saying they should get rid of the cat first thing, but yes, people can "become allergic".
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissKalamata View Post
People definitely can become allergic to things they weren't allergic to before. I'm not saying they should get rid of the cat first thing, but yes, people can "become allergic".
No doubt that is true, however, it seems that the #1 reason why people turn their "beloved" cats into a shelter is because someone in the household suddenly gets allergic after years with the cat. It makes all of us that have worked in shelters become very hardened by the excuse.

My sister actually developed allergies to dogs after living with them for about 8 years. She landed in the hospital in an oxygen tent for about a week. What did she do? Moved out of the house rather than putting us thru the agony of rehoming the dog. Had she not done that, I would have probably moved out and taken the dog with me.

There are always options.
post #11 of 15
I operate a small childcare in my home, and on more than one occasion, I've lost a kid because their pediatrician tells the parents my cats are causing them allergies. They caught another cold? It must be the daycare provider's cats!

Upon following up with these families (small town - people know everyone) - I invariably hear that the kid did even worse when they left here.

Once I had a woman who owned two large dogs (but didn't like cats) have her baby - yes, baby - go through extensive allergy testing (pricking the back several times with allergens) to prove she must be allergic to my cats. Tests came back negative for cats, positive for dogs! The kid stayed here, and the woman had to eat her words (along with separate her big doggies from the baby).
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
Well, strictly speaking, allergies only develop with exposure to the protein in question. So, long exposure to cats could, indeed, result in an allergy.

I have noticed that even I, who has never had any allergies, get affected by certain cats to a small extent.
:Yeah:

You can, indeed develop allergy after a long while, any time in your life... To cats, food, anything really. Generally speaking, you are not born allergic to things, but you do develop allergic reactios depending on exposures and your immune system...
post #13 of 15
My view is take a Claritin and shut up!

I'm somewhat allergic to cats too, but I have 2 of them, and I will never complain about my allergy. I keep a bottle of Claritin (generic) in my purse at all times.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty's Mom View Post
My view is take a Claritin and shut up!

I'm somewhat allergic to cats too, but I have 2 of them, and I will never complain about my allergy. I keep a bottle of Claritin (generic) in my purse at all times.
My point is how many people who are "allergic " to cats, dogs, etc... continue to use scented laundry detergents, shampoos, expose themselves to house mites in carpets & unvacuumed mattresses; inadequate ventilation filters, etc. Until they stop exposing themselves to potential triggers, they will not know how sensitive they are.
Our lungs & immune systems are just like our skin - when sensitized, symptoms are made much worse!! Try wearing a scratchy wool sweater while you have a bad sunburn
BTW, I've been told by several allergists that people who are allergic to cats will usu. be allergic to sheep & horses, too. I had an ex-BF who was allergic to all of them, and most dogs, except for Portugese Water Dogs. I dated another guy who wasn't, but hated cats because he was so "allergic" - it turned out he was AFRAID of cats, because he'd been clawed by his grandmother's cat when he was a small child....
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Well its very interesting to know people can actually develope an allergy to cats, hmmm.

However, I still think it's a load of crock when there are 2 to 3 cats in the local classifieds every week looking for new homes because of that excuse!!

We have LOTS of visitors who are "allergic" (I find that is usually code for don't like...) to cats and actually keep allergy meds in our guest room for that very reason. No one has ever stoped being our friends or stoped coming over just because they get a little stuffy :P.
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