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New Genetic and archaeological findings about House cats!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Experts traditionally thought that the Egyptians were the first to domesticate the cat, some 3,600 years ago.

New findings suggest that cats started making themselves at home around people to take advantage of the mice and food scraps found in their settlements........ 10,000 yrs ago in the middle east instead.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ing-of-the-cat
post #2 of 13
That would suggest that relatively small statured, moderate-to-calm demeanor cats have existed at least that long.

Cool
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippymjp View Post
That would suggest that relatively small statured, moderate-to-calm demeanor cats have existed at least that long.

Cool
Cool, indeed.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
Experts traditionally thought that the Egyptians were the first to domesticate the cat, some 3,600 years ago.

New findings suggest that cats started making themselves at home around people to take advantage of the mice and food scraps found in their settlements........ 10,000 yrs ago in the middle east instead.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ing-of-the-cat
I thought Scientific American was a polling company. j/k

Very interesting
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
The part I think is the most interesting, is the part that proves how smart and manipulators our furry friends are: They were the only species that had no reason at all to be tamed and domesticated .
Cows had milk and meat, so did the sheep, dogs had hunting, guarding... All domesticated animals had a reason to be tamed.... but the cat! The cat brought themselves into the picture to eat around humans, and apparently used their charm to convince them they were needed - sounds familiar?
post #6 of 13
What about rodent control, though? We've got a real rodent problem in our town, owing to the way refuse is separated and collected, and a lot of people have cats for that reason alone. Sometimes there are even waiting lists at the "cat home".
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
What about rodent control, though? We've got a real rodent problem in our town, owing to the way refuse is separated and collected, and a lot of people have cats for that reason alone. Sometimes there are even waiting lists at the "cat home".
Apparently that was not the reason... They did come for food scraps and to eat rodents that were around where humans lived though. Humans were not the ones who brought them in...
post #8 of 13
That doesn't really surprise me. Egyptians were just the first to create lasting cat-themed artworks so we've always associated them with cat's domestication.
Cats are smart and food driven, and will go where the eating's good!
post #9 of 13
You know, when you think about it, the cohabitation of early humans and cats may have been a Shrek/Donkey kind of arrangement, with the humans being Donkey. Instead of bringing them, the early humans may have settled in areas that already had high cat populations simply because they were areas where rodents and pests were under control.

"Hey kitties...can we stay with you? In the morning, we'll make waffles..."
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippymjp View Post
You know, when you think about it, the cohabitation of early humans and cats may have been a Shrek/Donkey kind of arrangement, with the humans being Donkey. Instead of bringing them, the early humans may have settled in areas that already had high cat populations simply because they were areas where rodents and pests were under control.

"Hey kitties...can we stay with you? In the morning, we'll make waffles..."

Mike - you slay me!!!
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
The part I think is the most interesting, is the part that proves how smart and manipulators our furry friends are: They were the only species that had no reason at all to be tamed and domesticated .
Cows had milk and meat, so did the sheep, dogs had hunting, guarding... All domesticated animals had a reason to be tamed.... but the cat! The cat brought themselves into the picture to eat around humans, and apparently used their charm to convince them they were needed - sounds familiar?
I love it! Ain't that the truth? Our furry-purries sure are smart critters
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippymjp View Post
You know, when you think about it, the cohabitation of early humans and cats may have been a Shrek/Donkey kind of arrangement, with the humans being Donkey. Instead of bringing them, the early humans may have settled in areas that already had high cat populations simply because they were areas where rodents and pests were under control.

"Hey kitties...can we stay with you? In the morning, we'll make waffles..."
OMG, that is BRILLIANT, and very, very possible. Good thinking

"Hey kitties...can we stay with you? In the morning, we'll make waffles..."
post #13 of 13
I always kind of figured that farmers noticed that the cats went away when the mice (their food) got hunted down, and then the mice came back, so they started leaving food out to keep the cats around so that the mice would stay gone.
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