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Running Out of Options - Page 2

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 
Claude Update:

The situation has gotten progressively more...I'm not sure there is a word for it. Strange and complicated would suffice.

Taking some of the advice from the forums here, we started anew in some of the areas of focus. Since I last wrote, the halo has come off, and Claude goes back to licking his legs at every opportunity. They have now reverted back to looking as bad as they did pre-halo enforcement.

Now the weird part. Claude has been coming downstairs for the evening (he normally sleeps up in our bedroom) and jumping on my couch to lay at my feet....its quite endearing. We turn the volume down on the TV, I only move when needed (a cheap excuse to make my wife be the remote MC!), and we generally try to make the atmosphere as calming as possible.

This evening after my wife had already headed to bed, I was laying on the couch with a blanket at my feet and Claude was resting their contentedly. Suddenly, an overpowering smell of ammonia overtook me. Immediately, I looked down at Claude and he was still laying down, but his head was up and he was sniffing the blanket around him.

Being that he wasn't in "pee" mode, I immediately thought that one of our litter trained chins had decided to see how far he could shoot across the room, since their smell tends to have that highly concentrated ammonia smell. I went in their room, and nothing.

I came back, did the dog nose thing around Claude, and even though only one of my sniffers is currently working, I didn't smell it around Claude. I was seriously thinking he may have aimed and fired before I noticed, then assumed the position like nothing had happened.

I went back to sitting on the couch, thinking I may be having a stroke and if so I'd better be sitting down when it happened again.

Curiosity got the best of me, and I decided to grab Claude and smell him. Sure enough, he REEKED. The area underneath him also completely smelled just like he had dosed it with his own special blend. Whatever occurred happened while Claude was pretty much asleep, and "discipline" absolutely cannot be considered a factor.

The weird part about this is that he was in the curled up position, more than likely completely asleep, and everything was COMPLETELY DRY. However he "released" whatever he released, it was done in a fashion that I cannot explain.

This new wrinkle has me completely baffled. Even if he marks, isn't he supposed to get into that position? He wasn't threatened, he wasn't upset, he wasn't in pyscho mode...he was just....asleep.

Bedwetting?

Could this be more confusing?
post #32 of 38
Between the urination (especially that last episode you described!) and only going after his back legs with the licking till he bleeds I am wondering if he has some sort of neuropathy? He may be unable to control his bladder excretion because of muscular or nerve damage. He may also lick his legs if it feels strange to him (like numb or feeling pins and needles) or he is in pain.

I don't know what sort of testing a vet would do to determine if this is so but it is SOMETHING to look in to. I cannot imagine what you have been through already. I would definately talk to your vet and do some research into neuropathy and other nerve/muscular disorders.
post #33 of 38
I wonder if he is leaking a bit and the licking is caused by trying to keep himself clean or even irritation from urine dripping down his back legs? Definately sounds like a physical issue now, not a behavior one....
post #34 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fifi1puss View Post
Between the urination (especially that last episode you described!) and only going after his back legs with the licking till he bleeds I am wondering if he has some sort of neuropathy? He may be unable to control his bladder excretion because of muscular or nerve damage. He may also lick his legs if it feels strange to him (like numb or feeling pins and needles) or he is in pain.

I don't know what sort of testing a vet would do to determine if this is so but it is SOMETHING to look in to. I cannot imagine what you have been through already. I would definately talk to your vet and do some research into neuropathy and other nerve/muscular disorders.
We've dealt with neuropathic disorders at the long term shelter we volunteer for. This is an excellent suggestion and I am going to have them look into it asap.
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by fifi1puss View Post
Between the urination (especially that last episode you described!) and only going after his back legs with the licking till he bleeds I am wondering if he has some sort of neuropathy? He may be unable to control his bladder excretion because of muscular or nerve damage. He may also lick his legs if it feels strange to him (like numb or feeling pins and needles) or he is in pain.

I don't know what sort of testing a vet would do to determine if this is so but it is SOMETHING to look in to. I cannot imagine what you have been through already. I would definately talk to your vet and do some research into neuropathy and other nerve/muscular disorders.
Great idea!!!
post #36 of 38
Thank you for all you're doing with Claude!

It is really starting to sound like a physical problem. While looking into the neuropathic disorders, please discuss with your vet the option of using Elavil (amytriptaline) instead of Prozac. Elavil is classed as an anti-depressant, but it doesn't really work as such (in humans or animals). What it does do is cause people (and animals) to retain their pee. It is given to children with bed-wetting problems. We used it on a short-term basis to retrain one of our kitties that was having a stres-pee problem. It made her go pee once a day in a really huge pee - and she started using the litter box within one day of her first dose.

It may not be a long-term solution - but it may be a short-term one while you work out what the actual problem is.

Vibes for you, your wife, and Claude!
post #37 of 38
Prozac and other SSRI medications can be stimulating in a way which contributes to rather than reducing anxiety. (I'm not an expert on cats' mental health, but have been a psych nurse for humans for a long time.) I would suggest trying Klonopin or Valium. These are actual anti-anxiety medications. (The vet who vaccinated my feline friend suggested trying one of them if we ever needed another visit, so I know cats can take them. Cats can handle a surprisingly large dose of either, he explained.) Since your boy doesn't go outdoors, it won't matter if he's a little bit loopy while adjusting to it.
cheddi
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheddi View Post
Prozac and other SSRI medications can be stimulating in a way which contributes to rather than reducing anxiety. (I'm not an expert on cats' mental health, but have been a psych nurse for humans for a long time.)
Thank you for this post, it explains a lot. OT here, but one of my grown children has some problems, and for years has refused to see any one but her MD about it. He recently changed her meds to a combination of stuff including Prozac, and she started having more and worse panic attacks. The only good to come was that she actually went to see a psychiatrist who took her off almost everything! It's a little scary that an MD without the training in psychiatry can just randomly prescribe for mental health issues.
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