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World's Tallest Dog Dies From Cancer

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
http://www.kcra.com/news/20373049/detail.html
post #2 of 14
RIP, Gibson. I like Danes, but couldn't have one because of the low life expectancy.
post #3 of 14
I wondered if that was unusually young.

Do you think there might be some connection between his growth, which seems excessive, and the cancer?
post #4 of 14
Who knows? Usually you have to be extremely careful not to let Danes romp after eating, as their stomachs can easily twist, and they seem prone to arthritis at an early age, which is bad news with a dog you can't carry.

Their life expectancy is just 6 - 8 years.
post #5 of 14
I knew it was short, but not that short!
post #6 of 14
The only breed I can recall having a shorter life expectancy is a Leonberger, which is also pretty big.
post #7 of 14
That seems a bit young, but with Danes I know they are lucky to live to about 10 yrs old, so it may not be "so young" in the breed.
post #8 of 14
Rip to Gibson......
post #9 of 14
Most Danes are lucky to make it to 8....so I guess he had a good run. Handsome fella. I love BIG dogs but their short lifespans are hard. I have a Rott, and evidently average lifespan for them is 8 1/2 to 9. He's already 6 .
post #10 of 14
Poor fella! I'm glad he went peacefully though. I remember seeing him on Oprah

One of my good friends had a great dane that lived to be 12 yrs old. The 6-8yr thing is just a guideline, not always concrete....just depends on the dog.
post #11 of 14
Having been owned by 2 greyhounds, I do know that bone cancer is very common in long boned dogs such as greyhounds and danes, and it typically strikes their legs.

Harlequin Danes are beautiful dogs. We had neighbors in Texas who bred them.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany View Post
Having been owned by 2 greyhounds, I do know that bone cancer is very common in long boned dogs such as greyhounds and danes, and it typically strikes their legs.

Harlequin Danes are beautiful dogs. We had neighbors in Texas who bred them.
I didn't know that about greyhounds. Our neighbors' greyhound had to be put down a few weeks ago due to cancer, but he was 16, which is a really ripe old age for a dog his size. In his case, chemo gave him 3 or 4 extra years of "quality" life. Sometimes it seems as if pets are even more prone to cancer than people.
post #13 of 14
My uncle's S/O used to have Danes but switched to a lab, after a while she couldn't take grief because of the shorter lifespans. 8-10 years is a lonnnng life for one of them from what I understand.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
Sometimes it seems as if pets are even more prone to cancer than people.
Cancer is a degenerative disease. In the Middle Ages, very few people died of cancer; they didn't live long enough. If we conquered every other disease, so that people lived to 150, we would probably all die of cancer, eventually. Some cancers are so common, they might be considered normal. A good example is prostate cancer, which virtually all men will get if they live long enough.
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