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TNR them?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I think I may be able to trap one or two of this latest litter at the feral colony. They are probably close to big enough for a pediatric sterilization, but then what?

These are young kittens, I hate to return them to the colony where they are all just barely getting by, but I don't know any other option. I feed the colony a few times a week, and just learned that the other woman who fed them has been diagnosed with late stage breast cancer, so they have lost a part of their food supply. (Vibes for her please, beyond the fact that many cats depend on her, she is just plain a very sweet, shy soul who I would hate to see suffer.) There are no no kill shelters in the area, just a few crazy cat women like me whos homes are already filled to the max.

Should I return them and hope the vet smell on them doesn't cause the colony to turn on them? Should I let them be outdoor kitties at my house? It's not been a year yet since I was able to catch and bring in the last of the cats who were already living wild at my house when I moved here. I quit putting out food here at home because so many more kept showing up and I ran out of funds and room to personally adopt any more.
post #2 of 9
Is there perhaps a no-kill shelter near you that could take them? Or, there's always Craigslist but you know the old saying.. "The odds are good, but the goods are odd."
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by srrh View Post
Is there perhaps a no-kill shelter near you that could take them? Or, there's always Craigslist but you know the old saying.. "The odds are good, but the goods are odd."
Not a single No Kill shelter anywhere near, and the ones in Atlanta will be full, it's kitten season. I'm not sure if any of those would take ferals anyhow as it is a long slow process to gain their trust, and by the time they are social enough to be adoptable most are past the cute kitten stage and into the gangly legs too long almost a cat phase.

Their being true ferals would be a hindrance on Craigslist too, not many folks want three pounds of hissing, spitting, terrified kitten in the house for an unspecified length of time.

I've had one who was tame within days, one who is only starting to trust me after 21 months, the majority start to watch me play and cuddle with the other cats after a couple weeks, sniff me after a month, permit petting soon after, and turn into cuddly cats over the next few months.

I suppose the best thing would be to just return them where they are now after they are spayed and hope for the best.
post #4 of 9
Try Craig's List, be honest about what they are and put in some links to sites that show how to tame them. You might find someone who will take one on as a challenge.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by bookworm View Post
(Vibes for her please, beyond the fact that many cats depend on her, she is just plain a very sweet, shy soul who I would hate to see suffer.)
Vibes and blessings are hereby send!
post #6 of 9
Bless you for trying! Feral colonies are never easy to manage. Every decision you make is a hard one. I still haven't figured out how not to adopt the strays and ferals in my area. I see them in need and I gotta try to help them. Maybe with just these two kittens you could keep them around just long enough to get them to settle and then find them a new home? I know it's a long shot. But you say they're close to the weight for pediatric spay/neuter, which means they've gotta be very small kittens. The younger ones tend to become docile in just a few weeks. But then again, it IS kitten season. ANd there are no shelters in my area either, so I know how hard it is to try to decide what to do. Maybe if you get them spay/neutered, you'll be able to find a home for them very quickly. Put ads in the newspapers. Someone might just be looking for a new kitty for their furever home. Best of luck to you and these babies. And massive for the lady that helps out.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamhainBorn View Post
Bless you for trying! Feral colonies are never easy to manage. Every decision you make is a hard one. I still haven't figured out how not to adopt the strays and ferals in my area. I see them in need and I gotta try to help them. Maybe with just these two kittens you could keep them around just long enough to get them to settle and then find them a new home?
That was my plan with 11 of the 13 cats I now have. I've rehomed 5 in the last few years, lost 4 and still have every other one I've rescued. I've run out of responsible aquaintance who want cats! Now that I have an entire room devoted to litter boxes I have nowhere to isolate new ones long enough to find out what they may be carrying. Earmites for sure, the mother has been holding her head sideways for months now, and I still have one at home I can barely touch, let alone apply Revolution to or treat for earmites.
post #8 of 9
That's a tough one. How old are these kittens? Are they young enough to be fairly easily tamed? If that's the case could you maybe put out an ad on Craigslist looking for a fosterhome for them? Do you have anywhere in your house where you can foster and tame them yourself? If it comes down to it a large cage would work during the isolation period.
If they are tameable they will eventually be adoptable. If they are too old, however, that's not an option. No shelters that I know of will take feral cats except for for euthanasia so that wouldn't be an option even if there were any shelters near by.
If making them outside kittens by your place is possible I don't think that sounds like a horrible option. It's not good but there are no good option with ferals. There are only lesser of evils. At your place you could make sure they are fed and get them shelter for the winter.

If you do choose to get them fixed and return them to the colony I don't think there would be any problem with the other cats accepting them back. I've never seen that with cats I've TNR'd. They know each other and a few days apart doesn't change that.

In regards to the colony getting fed is there any way you can recruit one or two other people to come and feed them so that they get fed every day? Maybe put out ads on Craigslist and flyers at pet stores and vets offices, maybe even the library. It's just so sad that the cats only get fed a few times a week. I feed my ferals once a day and they are always hungry when I come. I couldn't imagine how hungry they would be if they only got fed a few times a week.

I'll send some good vibes to your friend with cancer too. Isn't it ironic that bad things always happen to good people?
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizita View Post
I'll send some good vibes to your friend with cancer too. Isn't it ironic that bad things always happen to good people?
It's been a bad year for cat ladies around here, one died last fall in a head on with a tractor trailer, and now Ms D has cancer.

The gas station manager throws out the hot dogs etc, that are going out of date to them, and there is good hunting there, they just don't get real cat food every day. They're solid kitties, but could sure use some ear mite treatment and need de sexed for sure.

There is a real TNR in the next county. I called them three years ago, and when they set out traps for this colony all were stolen the same day. I fugure I'll have to set mine before dark and just hang out on the premises to ensure it isn't stolen.
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