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Questions about EVO

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
OK first I have to say, don't get all excited. I asked this question on a dog forum and everyone got all upset. I KNOW that feeding a cat regular dog food will kill them. I KNOW that usually dog foods aren't nutritionally complete for cats. I just want objective opinions on the differences between EVO that's sold for cats and the EVO that's sold for dogs.

Back before they made EVO cat food, a local pet store was selling "dog" EVO as being good for any carnivore pet (dogs, cats, ferrets, etc.). They said it was the best thing since raw, it has taurine so it's fine for cats and ferrets, etc. Of course once "cat" EVO came out, they sold that to you for cats and ferrets, because of course it costs more .

So here's the link to the nutrition info for EVO small bites dog formula:
http://www.evopet.com/products/default.asp?id=1488
http://www.petfooddirect.com/store/p...Fid=1052&Page=
and for the cat formula:
http://www.evopet.com/products/default.asp?id=1500
http://www.petfooddirect.com/store/p...Fid=1052&Page=

So, nutritionally, what's the difference between EVO for dogs and EVO for cats? The dog formula is considerably cheaper (about $1.94 a pound) than the cat formula (about $2.66 a pound). But that might just be because of the larger bag.
post #2 of 11
EVO dog and cat are IDENTICAL in canned so you can ... No one will get mad about you asking a VERY good IMHO ?

Now the dry I am off to compare I do THINK there are difference s

There is MORE protein in the cat which seems logical as cat s should have more
post #3 of 11
The one thing I noticed with the dog formula it has garlic in it... I thought garlic was toxic to cats?

The dog has less protein (but even so, its still a good comparable level to other cat foods), more carbs and more ash. But those are all relative to what levels you personally like to see...
post #4 of 11
I will note the difference s by adding some color


Cat analysis
Moisture \t7.5 %
Protein \t50.5 %
Fat \t22.2 %
Linoleic Acid \t4.0 %
Omega 3 \t0.44 %

Carbohydrates \t7.0 %
Fiber \t0.81 %
Ash \t9.4 %
Calcium \t2.45 %
Phosphorous \t1.58 %

Magnesium \t0.1 %
Sodium \t0.38 %
Potassium \t0.66 %
Chloride \t0.61 %
Iron \t205 mg/kg
Zinc \t183.73 mg/kg
Copper \t21.58 mg/kg
Iodine \t3.97 mg/kg
Manganese \t20.46 mg/kg
Selenium \t1.2 mg/kg
Arginine \t3.62 %
Histidine \t1.0 %
Isoleucine \t2.03 %

Leucine \t3.55 %
Lysine \t3.4 %
Methionine \t1.27 %
Met-Cysteine \t1.82 %
Phenylalanine \t2.13 %
Phe-Tyrosine \t3.73 %
Threonine \t2.06 %
Tryptophan \t0.51 %
Valine \t2.47 %
Taurine \t0.27 %
Choline \t3965.56 mg/kg
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) \t6.91 mg/kg
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) \t15.01 mg/kg
Niacin \t67 mg/kg
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) \t4.12 mg/kg
Folic Acid \t0.98 mg/kg
Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) \t17 mg/kg
Biotin \t0.14 mg/kg
Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) \t12 ug/kg
Vitamin A \t24618 IU/kg
Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) \t500 mg/kg
Vitamin D \t2373 IU/kg
Vitamin E \t300 IU/kg
Vitamin K \t0.83 mg/kg
Calculated Calorie Content* \t4052.15 kcal/kg



DOG analysis
Moisture \t7.5 %
Protein \t43.16 %
Fat \t22.22 %
Linoleic Acid \t4.2 %
Omega 3 \t0.52 %
Carbohydrates \t11.42 %
Fiber \t1.52 %
Ash \t11.14 %
Calcium \t2.55 %
Phosphorous \t1.57 %
Magnesium \t0.11 %
Sodium \t0.38 %
Potassium \t0.77 %
Chloride \t0.67 %
Iron \t236 mg/kg
Zinc \t226 mg/kg
Copper \t18 mg/kg
Iodine \t3.8 mg/kg
Manganese \t21 mg/kg
Selenium \t0.9 mg/kg
Arginine \t3.09 %
Histidine \t0.85 %
Isoleucine \t1.68 %
Leucine \t2.97 %
Lysine \t2.77 %
Methionine \t0.96 %
Met-Cysteine \t1.35 %
Phenylalanine \t1.72 %
Phe-Tyrosine \t3.01 %
Threonine \t1.71 %
Tryptophan \t0.41 %
Valine \t2.03 %
Taurine \t3000 mg/kg
Choline \t1979.31 mg/kg
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) \t4.45 mg/kg
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) \t5.03 mg/kg
Niacin \t37.8 mg/kg
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) \t4.77 mg/kg
Folic Acid \t0.79 mg/kg
Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) \t20.87 mg/kg
Biotin \t0.11 mg/kg
Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) \t10 ug/kg
Vitamin A \t23894.42 IU/kg
Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) \t500 mg/kg
Vitamin D \t2329.55 IU/kg
Vitamin E \t300 IU/kg
Vitamin K \t0.73 mg/kg
Calculated Calorie Content* \t3852.91 kcal/k


You will see the CAT is VERY different in the micro and macro nutrients from the dog .. IMHO I would stick with cat if the $$ are too high we can suggest some less $$ alternatives
post #5 of 11
Sharky, I'm still curious about the garlic.... I thought it was toxic, is that correct? As in you wouldn't want to feed a cat, a food with garlic in it?
post #6 of 11
I wouldn't be too concerned about the garlic here... it's ingredient #14, and quite a few cat foods have it too... It's toxic in higher quantities, IMO in this case is not enough to be a problem...
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I'm aware of the less expensive options, and if I were going to go grain-free I'd probably choose TOTW. But I have several older males, so I think I'll stick with Chicken Soup. They've been doing great on it for a few years now, and I don't want to upset the status quo. I do sometimes throw some dog EVO into the ferrets' food mixture. Probably not enough to hurt, though.

There's always a debate about garlic in dog/cat foods. At that amount, it's probably not harmful, but you do have to be careful.

So, Sharky, you think there's a big enough variation in the dog versus cat formulas to make a difference?

When you feed prey-model raw, your feeding program for cats and your feeding program for dogs of similar size would be generally identical, except for taurine supplementation for the cats. So theoretically, a quality cat food and a quality dog food should be nearly identical.

I'm confused by their info about the taurine.....in the cat ingredients, it says 0.27%, in the ferret ingredients, it says 0.27 mgs per kg, and in the dog ingredients it says 3000 mgs per kg. On the website. On the petfooddirect page, it says, 0.23% taurine for the dog food.
post #8 of 11
3000mg/kg = 0.3%, which is about about the same as 0.27%
post #9 of 11
the taurine did get me and I have no idea what to say on it ... they want us confused

Yes there is IMHO a good amount of difference and I would use the cat for cat and dog for dog

As for raw my model is more a chunk model I used a general supplement ( on advice from my nutritionally decreed vet ) and taurine to both cat and dog

In theory the foods should be nearly identical but remember most PF company's think of the dog as a carnivorous omnivore not a reg carnivore

I personally avoid garlic in foods as I believe it should be used ONLY medicinally under a vets care ... IMHO too much info and note enough facts on it
post #10 of 11
What do you say you try natures variety instinct kibble. It's cheaper and still parallel in quality. The protein quantity nearly identical. NV is 50% protein vs evo's 50.5 % lol not much of a difference so don't feel bad.

http://www.naturesvariety.com/instinct
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jordan S. View Post
What do you say you try natures variety instinct kibble. It's cheaper and still parallel in quality. The protein quantity nearly identical. NV is 50% protein vs evo's 50.5 % lol not much of a difference so don't feel bad.

http://www.naturesvariety.com/instinct
In MANY areas Natures is more money than evo and they are based on the same premise but IMHO far different foods
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