New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Polydactyl breeders - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosswd View Post
Extra toes are not a deformity.

They are considered an anomaly (deviation from the norm)
... just two different ways to describe the same thing. If you look up both definitions you find this:


de⋅form⋅i⋅ty  [di-fawr-mi-tee] Show IPA
–noun, plural -ties.

1.\tthe quality or state of being deformed, disfigured, or misshapen.
2.\tPathology. an abnormally formed part of the body.
3.\ta deformed person or thing.
4.\thatefulness; ugliness.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/deformity


deformity

when a part of the body has not developed in the normal way or with the normal shape

from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...0382&dict=CALD

a⋅nom⋅a⋅ly  [uh-nom-uh-lee] Show IPA
–noun, plural -lies.

1.\ta deviation from the common rule, type, arrangement, or form.
2.\tsomeone or something anomalous: With his quiet nature, he was an anomaly in his exuberant family.
3.\tan odd, peculiar, or strange condition, situation, quality, etc.
4.\tan incongruity or inconsistency.
5.\tAstronomy. a quantity measured in degrees, defining the position of an orbiting body with respect to the point at which it is nearest to or farthest from its primary.
6.\tMeteorology. the amount of deviation of a meteorological quantity from the accepted normal value of that quantity.
7.\tGrammar. irregularity.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/anomaly

anomaly

a person or thing that is different from what is usual, or not in agreement with something else and therefore not satisfactory

from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...3048&dict=CALD


regards,

Christine
post #32 of 46
In CFA, no breed is allowed to be shown with extra toes. It is a disualifiable fault. This also applies to the Maine Coons. I think it is different in other associations, and opinions on the issue are quite strong from one association to the next.

My personal opinion. . . we don't know what comes along with extra toes. Time has proven that certain mutations come along with a predisposition for other unwanted traits. Why introduce/propagate an unknown mutation in an already healthy breed?
post #33 of 46
At our show, we had a very interesting discussion with Julie Nichols (Australian judge) and the polydactyl issue came up because this was dealing with MC's and poly and "acceptance".

Most are against it. and Julie said that when you get too many toes it will cause bone problems in the way the MC's are walking with their weight and size. Right now it doesn't seem to be in issue, but HOW MANY IS TOO MANY TOES?

To what extreme will breeders go if its accepted? Will there be a limit on the number of toes?

IMO it should never be accepted in a purebred and it should never be encouraged to breed for this in any breed or mixed breed cat. Not everyone is ethical and think of the nightmares in the hands of backyard breeders!
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
At our show, we had a very interesting discussion with Julie Nichols (Australian judge) and the polydactyl issue came up because this was dealing with MC's and poly and "acceptance".

Most are against it. and Julie said that when you get too many toes it will cause bone problems in the way the MC's are walking with their weight and size. Right now it doesn't seem to be in issue, but HOW MANY IS TOO MANY TOES?

To what extreme will breeders go if its accepted? Will there be a limit on the number of toes?

IMO it should never be accepted in a purebred and it should never be encouraged to breed for this in any breed or mixed breed cat. Not everyone is ethical and think of the nightmares in the hands of backyard breeders!
Hmm,

it IS a controversal topic and some MC breeders will want polys while others don't think it right.

If polys are accepted in show I'd say that there should be a regulation concerning the numbers of extra digits and their positioning.

regards,

Christine
post #35 of 46
Even if you try to limit - HOW would you possibly do it? Its not a control thing - and if it has too many toes? - will the cat be petted out? Will it be bred anyway even if not shown?

IMO its a nightmare waiting to happen!
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
Most are against it. and Julie said that when you get too many toes it will cause bone problems in the way the MC's are walking with their weight and size. Right now it doesn't seem to be in issue, but HOW MANY IS TOO MANY TOES?

IMO it should never be accepted in a purebred and it should never be encouraged to breed for this in any breed or mixed breed cat. Not everyone is ethical and think of the nightmares in the hands of backyard breeders!
I totally agree. As I said in a previous discussion about polydactyls, I know two bad examples how this deformity can ruin a cats life. The other cat had to have the extra toes amputated because they were causing her a lot of pain and affected her ability to walk, and the other cat had to be put to sleep because of it.

If people haven't seen or heard anything bad about polydactyls, they propably don't realize how bad the situation may get if they start breeding them on purpose. However, they could use their common sense..if they have any.
post #37 of 46
Just a random factoid, worldwide record is 28 toes on one cat. 7 on all four paws.
post #38 of 46
Here is the SOP we have for MCO's in NZ if you are interested:

http://www.nzcf.com/breeds/sop/MaineCoon.pdf

I'll also add that the MCO people are arguing that they are NOT breeding for extra toes, it is infact an original part of the breed and they would like it to stay. They are not breeding them because they like extra toes and wouldn't breed cats just because they had extra toes.
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernGlow View Post
I totally agree. As I said in a previous discussion about polydactyls, I know two bad examples how this deformity can ruin a cats life. The other cat had to have the extra toes amputated because they were causing her a lot of pain and affected her ability to walk, and the other cat had to be put to sleep because of it.

If people haven't seen or heard anything bad about polydactyls, they propably don't realize how bad the situation may get if they start breeding them on purpose. However, they could use their common sense..if they have any.
As a human being with a genetic joint disorder, I would plead with every breeder out there to try to not breed any feature that may potentially cause pain or difficulty. You may think that achy feet are OK in the search for the perfect head/ear/coat, but given that I experience it every day, I don't think it's OK at all - if there is even a small risk of the sort of problem described above, it is IMO unethical to deliberately breed such cats.

I don't have extra toes, but I do have foot and hand problems which are not even visible, caused by joint problems right inside my joints, ligaments, and tendons - and yes sometimes that genetic abnormality makes me wish I'd never been born, because it causes me pain and ongoing problems every day of my life.

I look completely physically normal, there is absolutely no outward sign of the pain and discomfort I suffer every day - and I don't moan and cry about it either, the only way you would know about it is because I can speak and can tell you.

So please consider very strongly before breeding from a cat with extra toes which in itself will eventually put additional pressure on the joints and small bones within the foot - is it worth it just to have the perfect ears or head to perpetuate a physical deviation that places extra stress on the small joints of the foot? IMO it is never worth the risk of foot pain - if you'd experienced it yourself you'd know before I told you
post #40 of 46

Hello every one. We would like to thank many who have been helpful to us on this site. We  will be rewarded  with an early Christmas present, a very beautiful Ragdoll kitten, the kitten will be here with us in a week, we are all so excited!. This is a great site to hear other people's opinions on, whether it is agreeable or not. Having  these differences on topics, makes the world interesting. Have a wonderful Christmas, and a great 2012 to all you cat lovers.  


Edited by Wilkie Major - 12/14/11 at 4:54pm
post #41 of 46

There are no polydactyl breeders here. Polydactyl is not a breed and this site is pro-neuter to moggies (it's in the site rules). Only breeders with real pedigreed cats and breeding programs should be breeding cats.

 

Which registry you were breeding under? Ours doesn't allow outcrosses to Manx, or polydactyls to be bred or shown in any breed.

And what is a ginger cat?? I don't think I've ever heard of such thing? (This must be one of those Chevy things mrblanche was telling me about..)

post #42 of 46
If you read back through this thread you will see that this is a controversial topic, and that although some breeds (like Maine Coons) are more prone to polydactylism t han others, it is not a thing most breeders would promote and in some breeds would actually disqualify a cat from being shown. IMO, a cat with both the tailless gene (whether a true Manx or not) and a polydactyl gene would be close to being deformed, could be in constant pain and should not be bred from.
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson View Post

If you read back through this thread you will see that this is a controversial topic, and that although some breeds (like Maine Coons) are more prone to polydactylism t han others, it is not a thing most breeders would promote and in some breeds would actually disqualify a cat from being shown. IMO, a cat with both the tailless gene (whether a true Manx or not) and a polydactyl gene would be close to being deformed, could be in constant pain and should not be bred from.


Some forms of polydactylism are connected to other health problems, but not all are. For example the type that Maine Coons can carry is not associated with health problems at all and is not detrimental to their health. It also does not result in successive generations having more and more toes; generally they have one or two (less often 3) extra toes on a foot.

This has existed in the Maine Coon breed since the beginning, and according to what I have read it was originally going to be part of the breed standard. There are breeders trying to preserve it and people trying to get it accepted for championship status for showing. Currently (last I checked which was a while ago) TICA has accepted polydactyl Maine Coons in their "New Traits" class, and there are polydactyls being shown in that category. 

post #44 of 46
Thank you for clarifying my post. I did not make it clear enough that MCs are different from other cats when it comes to Polydactylism.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson View Post

Thank you for clarifying my post. I did not make it clear enough that MCs are different from other cats when it comes to Polydactylism.


It depends on the organization, for example Fifé (the largest European cat registry) will not allow polydactylism in any breed, not even on Maine Coons. It's a disqualifying deformity.

post #46 of 46
Thanks. It gets more and more complicated the more you delve into it! My brother in the UK actually has a longhaired polydactyl (not MC though), and fortunately he does not seem to suffer any bad effects.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding