TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › You know you'e a reptile owner when.....(add yours)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

You know you'e a reptile owner when.....(add yours)

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I thought about this the other day.

Sunday I had taken some rodents out of the freezer to thaw... with how I've been feeling, I let them thaw on their own instead of hot water.

They ended up in my fridge till Tues

You know you're a reptile/snake owner when:

- you open your fridge and amongst the groceries is a bin full of thawing rodents. ( I actually took a pic of it, was funny...but I won't post it here, so's not to offend anyone)

- the neighbourhood refers to you as "The Snake Lady"

- when you wash snake bins in your front lawn, and neighbours KNOW exactly what all those rubbermaids are

- when you regularly check the dollar store for new products. (they have some kick butt dishes for water dishes...cheap husbandry supplies)

- when you ask someone how their balls are doing and you are not talking to a male

- the pet store calls you, to help them identify a snake. (had this one a few times....one of the co-ops in town, gets people who take off in the middle of the night, and a couple have left behind snakes)

- your normal clothing has at least one piece of shavings on it LOL.

how bout you? Got any to add?
post #2 of 16
Hahahaha those are great. I can only think of a couple right now, my brain is fried.


-When you see a dead/squashed snake on the side of the side you go, "AWWWW that poor little thing!" (My mom STILL gawks at me for doing this!)

-People call you "Reptile Girl" or "Lizard girl" (Yeah... Kinda irritating but like I care.)

-You insist that reptiles have personalities.

-When a church lady finds a turtle on the side of the road she automatically comes to you for help and advice.
post #3 of 16
When your neighbors call on you for snake ID and removal.

I think I've finally convinced them to leave the harmless snakes in their yards
post #4 of 16
Hm, I can't think of anything to add along those lines since I'm not a snake keeper. How about:

You breed insects for reptile food - several tubs of them, in fact.

Buy all sorts of vegetables that you'd never eat. Mustard greens and parsnips - yuck!

Can list the calcium to phosphorus for veggies and several feeder insects. Amount of calcium, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, oxalates, etc commonly found in several veggies. And so on.

Refuse to treat the yard with anything because it might kill or drive the bugs away.

You actually want slugs to infest the hostas.
post #5 of 16
You have a what or you want a what?? ... lol.. I love reptiles and was graced with a box turtle in my very young yrs for a bit ( typically 7-9 yr olds are NOT right for reptiles especially if said kid wanted a cat ) ... Now I cant have any due to immune disorder making it easy to catch little bugs like salmonella
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
Now I cant have any due to immune disorder making it easy to catch little bugs like salmonella
Lots of people with immune problems, including those on anti-tnf's and chemo, have or refuse to give up their reptiles.

They're no more likely to make you ill than your furred pets are. Simply don't go around licking reptiles, your hands after handling a reptile, or any of it's cage decorations.

Doctors that tell you reptiles will make you sick are the same ones that usually say cats need to go whenever a woman is expecting a baby.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post

Buy all sorts of vegetables that you'd never eat. Mustard greens and parsnips - yuck!
Dandelion greens are a favorite in my house... I actually tried them, a little too bitter for my liking.

ETA: a favorite amongst my dragons, not us humans LOL
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snake_Lady View Post
Dandelion greens are a favorite in my house... I actually tried them, a little too bitter for my liking.

ETA: a favorite amongst my dragons, not us humans LOL
You have to pick the smaller leaves for that, and then they can be ok - cooked or mixed with other greens in a salad. They're a great source of calcium and if they come from a untreated yard or field will be much more nutritious than grocery greens.
Have you tried shepherds purse greens? They have a sweet smell to them that my turtles love.

I used to have a nice site bookmarked that had info on wild edible plants (both for reptiles and humans)... seems I lost that, too. http://www.turtlestuff.com/plantid.html lists a few, though.

Burr medic is edible?!

^And that's the sort of conversation a non reptile owner may never have.


Looking up salmonella in cats and dogs (it's something to do...), apparently cats can spread it via saliva. I did not know that!
post #9 of 16
--you bring home your leftover fruit or veggie salad at a restaurant because the turtles will just love to eat it for a treat--oh yeah and I always ask for my dressing on the side for that reason

--you have a container of earthworms next to the mayonnaise in the fridge

--your husband is terribly embarassed to go out in public with you when you wear your "Turtle its whats not for dinner" t shirt

--the theme of your wedding is turtles--including a bride and groom turtle on top of a cake decorated with cattails

Leslie
post #10 of 16
LMAO @ when someone asks you how your balls are doing!

well when me and BF were on vacation in USVI there was this big gigantic cute iguana that would walk around the beach and get really close to people,he wasnt afraid of people at all. i got a HUGE kick out of these girls on their lawn chairs when they opened their eyes and seen him right there they got up and ran, i had some of the food, and he came right over i was hand feeding him and then he got on my lap!! everyone was looking at me like i was nutz and i just thought it was the most cutest thing ever!
post #11 of 16
You always have space for one more viv.

There's more snake food in the freezer than there is human food.

You refer to being gravid instead of pregnant.

You KNOW all your snakes have different personalities.

People think you're nuts when you tell them you are owned by 19 snakes, 12 cats and a dog
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Python View Post

There's more snake food in the freezer than there is human food.

You refer to being gravid instead of pregnant.
That would be why we have 3 freezers. One in my snake room filled with rodents, the other two are human food. My husband was behind that, for some reason he did not like the idea of having rodents next to our chicken. I don't know why, it's all frozen

I have made the gravid comment more than once
post #13 of 16
my thing always seems to be people come to the house ,I bypass the kids and other animals and am like "come check out how my mealworm colonies are doing haha"
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
--
--you have a container of earthworms next to the mayonnaise in the fridge

Leslie
thats me!

the people at the bait stores always ask "going fishing??" and im like "oh no... i have a turtle"

i had a ball python growing up and i always loved reptiles, i think they are adorable.
post #15 of 16
-- When you go places and people don't recognize you without your reptile!

Sometimes at Petsmart and Petco the associates don't recognize me without Yavie perched on my shoulder.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfmoon View Post
my thing always seems to be people come to the house ,I bypass the kids and other animals and am like "come check out how my mealworm colonies are doing haha"
I raise mealworms, too. When everyone else was worry over the mealworm shortage I was fine with a very large colony (it takes up several bin drawers).

I can't say I've ever had the urge to show people my worm bins!


Unless my memory is completely gone the only commonly kept type of annelid that can and needs to be refrigerated are Canadian nightcrawlers. Earthworms such as those you find when digging in your yard are perfectly fine at room temps, red worms (European nightcrawlers) will die if kept too cold. Useless info: but red worms breed and grow very quickly. They're great for vermicomposting but have an off smell, and likely taste, to them that turtles are not fond of. When buying bait worms for reptile use, avoid the red worms as they're also commonly raised on manure. Also do not let them loose outside! They're not a native species in the US.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cats and Other Animals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › You know you'e a reptile owner when.....(add yours)