TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › In or Out?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

In or Out?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone. I'm new here and have a question about my kitten, Pip. We adopted him from the pound a little less than two weeks ago and although I don't need to worry about this until after he is neutered, I am trying to decide whether he should be an indoor or an indoor/outdoor cat. I have heard that indoor cats live much longer, but he is very adventurous and is already trying to sneak outside. Three of my other cats are indoor/outdoor. I will have to take him to college in a couple of years and I know he can't be indoor/outdoor at that point.

What do you all think? Will he finally drop the need to go outside, or will I always be fighting him? Thanks, Anna Marie.
post #2 of 23
It's easier to just keep him inside. If you let him get used to going out, it will be hard later when you have to keep him in.

And you raised him to be something besides coyote food, didn't you?
post #3 of 23
I agree, keep him in. He'll get use to being in eventually. What can help him adjust to being inside is for his inside environment to be stimulating - ie, toys , playtime with you, and cat furniture by a busy window (or one with a bird feeder near it).

It's only habit and boredom that will make him want to go out - well, some curiosity, too. But that can be overcome.
post #4 of 23
I agree keep him in.
My dads cat went missing because he did not listen and let him out a few months ago.
We believe the coyotes got him or qa wild animal.
They get used to staying in all my cats are indoor.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by PipnPop View Post
I will have to take him to college in a couple of years and I know he can't be indoor/outdoor at that point.
Obviously if he can't be outdoor... Prepare him for college life.
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by yayi View Post
Obviously if he can't be outdoor... Prepare him for college life.
Yes, teach him correct study methods!
post #7 of 23
I may get a lot of flack for this but I do not know that indoor cats live longer then indoor/outdoor cats, I know they live longer then strictly outdoor cats. Indoor/outdoor cats are less likely to sleep all the time and also less likely to be obese. Cats need stimulation.
In any event, I allow my cats free reign to go out whenever they want. They have to be inside before bed time and before I go away for more then 3 hours. They have been eaisly trained to come when called.
My thoughts are that there is nothing wrong with cats feeling grass on their feet and wind on their whiskers as well as expeiencing the smells.
I guess I am lucky because I have never had a cat not come back and all have lived reasonably long happy lives
Whatever you decide is right
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionken View Post
I may get a lot of flack for this but I do not know that indoor cats live longer then indoor/outdoor cats, I know they live longer then strictly outdoor cats. Indoor/outdoor cats are less likely to sleep all the time and also less likely to be obese. Cats need stimulation.
In any event, I allow my cats free reign to go out whenever they want. They have to be inside before bed time and before I go away for more then 3 hours. They have been eaisly trained to come when called.
My thoughts are that there is nothing wrong with cats feeling grass on their feet and wind on their whiskers as well as expeiencing the smells.
I guess I am lucky because I have never had a cat not come back and all have lived reasonably long happy lives
Whatever you decide is right
the above is my experience also , TRAINING is the key ... the ave for a indoor/ outdoor in the few studies is about 12-13 yrs ( ie s/n , up to date on shots and brought in at night)

BUT to the OP if you are indeed planning to take this cat to a dorm or apt when you go to school it is best not to allow kitty out
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionken View Post
Indoor/outdoor cats are less likely to sleep all the time and also less likely to be obese. Cats need stimulation.
I have a fully outdoor cat that stays with my in-laws. (he has cat to cat aggression and some cat to human aggression issues going on - and he only sprays to pee). He spends the majority of his days sleeping and because their neighbor thinks we starve him, he is very much overweight. We've told her he does get fed and even gets wet food daily.

Growing up, my parents would only allow indoor/outdoor cats. None of them lived to ten years old because of stray dogs and idiot drivers (we did not live on busy streets, but kids, drunks, morons, and legally blind drivers do not watch where they're going - case in point, I came close to being ran over on three separate occasions).

No amount of training to come in saves your cat when it's ran over on the street in front of your home... while coming home to come in that evening. And nothing can make a person forget witnessing that.
post #10 of 23
it does if they are trained to a cat proof yard
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
it does if they are trained to a cat proof yard
But that's considered a form of enclosure and not free roaming.


ETA: The indoor/outdoor debate has been overdone so much. To put the thread back on topic a little. The OP will be leaving to college in the near future and taking their cat. Outdoor is out of the question then, and enclosures on a rental would probably be, too.

PipnPop - Have you thought about harness training so you could take your cat on walks? That would give your kitty outside time and still work in a couple years when you go to college. And you could tell friends your kitty is so great it walks on a leash for you!
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Wow! Thanks for all the replies. Pip is still curious about the outdoors, but he loves playing indoors just as much, I think. I'm still not sure what to do with him, as both sides have good arguments. But taking him to college really is the breaking point, which is why indoor sounds like a good idea. I do not want him to become obese or bored, though, and I think I would feel a bit guilty cooping him up...there are so many points to be argued.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatPurrson View Post
We have 6 outdoor only cats, 2 are young kittens. They LOVE being outdoor cats, and hate being cooped up indoors for even a minute or two. We have a fenced in backyard for them, and they lounge out on the deck in the sunshine and patrol the yard for pesky mice. If you have a fenced yard, and they don't go out of it, they are not really outside cats... They don't run the risk of being hit by a car, or killed by a stray dog, or catching diseases from fighting with tom cats.The fact that perm. indoor cats live longer, happier lives is false and misunderstood. Really? I would love to see where your statistics are coming from. A cat inside do not run the same risks as outside cats do, period.We have a 12 yr old and a 9 yr old cat that have been outdoor only all their lives, and are happy, healthy and in good weight. On the contrary, a friend of ours has an indoor only cat that stares all day and paces the windows frantically eveytime we're over at their house. She's obese and declawed and her owners say she gets upset over every tiny change in the house. being obese, declawed and stressed has NOTHING to do with being inside. I wouldn't keep any cat indoors full time, it's like living in a prison. I do not feel in prison when I am home, neither do my cats - that's for sure...Quality of life is more important than quanity in my opinion. The question is: "If it were you, what would you want your mom to do?" What if your parents had never let you drive a car, you would've missed out on life. I trust you'll do what you think is best for your kitten. I guarantee you that any reasonable parent will not let their kids do whatever they want. This comes with good parenting and responsible ownership.Keep us posted.
.........................
post #14 of 23
I have seen so many cats that were ouside dead in the road.
A few were my neighbors cats and they were hit right in front of their house.
My cats are happy indoors and Coco is 17.
When you get cats from breeders you ahve to sign contracts that the cats will br indoor cats unless they got out on a leash with you.
My dads kitten and my Oreos brother both diapeared because they were allowed to go out.
My Bogart died because we let him out from being bit and so did Simba.
I agree with Carolina.
If you are going to live in a dorm then you might have a problem.
My sister had to leave her cat at my dads and then with me because cats were not allowed in the dorms.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by PipnPop View Post
I do not want him to become obese or bored, though, and I think I would feel a bit guilty cooping him up...there are so many points to be argued.
Your kitty isn't going to become obese just from being kept inside. That has more to do with diet and feedings. And who is to say your cat will be bored? That's why you and all of us, really, try to do our best to enrich our kitties lives with toys and playtime.
post #16 of 23
We've always had in/outdoor cats at home, so I do not fault anyone for making this choice but some suggestions if your cat needs to be indoor only because of your life situation (my current cat is indoor only because I live in a concrete jungle with a large feral population). Rentals and shared housing can be hard if not impossible to work with in/out cats.

If you are going to be in a dorm you should know that most do not allow pets at all, and only small caged animals if they do.

He may become less interested in the outdoors once he is neutered. My female kitten became a great escpae artist at 4mo/o. Spaying has greatly reduced her desire to see what's beyond the door. Also he may be lonely, if when you leave he will be alone and tries to follow you. When you go out and leave him in try some positive re-enforcement with treats I get ready then put 4-5 treats on the rug in the room farthest from the door, and make my escape. Aya is now much more positive about me leaving and staying in.
post #17 of 23
Indoor, I just spent over a hundred dollars when another tom cat attacked my spayed cat! She has been in and out her whole life, but she is fine with just inside now!
post #18 of 23
I would keep him indoors and maybe you should get some fun toys for him to keep himself entertained. Fun mouse cat toys will satisfy his hunting skills. Cats love to roam but it is healthier to keep your little guy inside.
post #19 of 23
My opinion is indoor only. I took 2 cats, strays, very friendly, into the house (at separate times) within the last 2 years because they were both very sick and very sweet cats. I had to have them put to sleep because of FIV positive complications. Theres a black cat out there now that the Vet said since these 2 had it. Its very likely he does too, especially since he is very aggresive toward other cats and they were all out there together. He came from a shelter that said he was fixed and clean a few years ago. The people that owned him moved away recently and left him. I'm working on bringing him to the Vet. When I bring him the chances are very good that he is FIV positive. Mine have been in the house for 11 years and are very happy.
post #20 of 23
I think in your particular situation it would be best to keep him indoors. All cats are curious but not all are equipped to deal with outdoor life. Some are more savvy than others. I have also run into a few that NEED to be outdoors. But being so young you can really have an advantage to TRAIN him in the life that is best for you and him. I guess what I am saying is just because he WANTS to go out doesn't mean he will ENJOY it once out there.

Also, it is unfair to show him the outdoors when you know you will need to take him away from that in a few years. It's not neccessary to be outdoors so don't feel bad about keeping him in. He will be okay.

In regards to the weight it is important to feed him a good diet as I am sure you know. you can get good info here about it. My cats like to eat wet and dry. I feed them 2x a day wet, the 3 of them share a meow mix pouch 2x a day. Than at night I put down 1/3 cup each of their Nutro dry food.

My cat Fiona was an indoor/outdoor cat for her first two years of life (not with me) and even though she still TRYS to escape she doesn't ever run away from me. She crouches down and lets me scoop her up. She just likes to go where she is not allowed.

My 3 are indoor as I have had some bad experiances with outdoor cat life....expensive ones also! My poor cat Sydney wasn't too happy either when he was hit by a car at 6 months of age (after neutering we let him out) and his poor leg was mangled...not cool at all.

It wasn't fun either coming home from work and seeing my sisters cat dead in the middle of the road. Horrific experiances that could have been avoided. I wish I had known than what I do now.

Cats can be happy indoors. My three are down right spoiled! Cat nip and lots of scratching posts, tall cat trees, windows with birds and squirrels and neighborhood goings-on. I have 3 baskets with cat toys and everyday I come home there are more on the floor, they just help themselves to their favorites! After I brush or clip their nails they get yummy treats, they really look forward to getting brushed because they know treats are coming.

Rocko does enjoy eating some greens and walking around outside so i put him in a harness on a lead and we go for a walk. He really does walk too! Like a dog! He enjoys his times out, it's another treat for him. The other two don't care for it. I can't imagine how crazy I would look with 3 on leashes.
post #21 of 23
Squirrel and Panther are indoor only for several reasons; they've only been indoors or on a private balcony since 8 weeks, so they don't know the difference. Chilsa was indoor-outdoor...I kept him indoors at the old apartment, because I didn't feel it was safe, but I had to catch him when he tried to sneak out several times. I think he was raised as an indoor-outdoor cat before I got him, so it was REALLY hard for him to adapt to being indoor-only.

My advice: Save your kitty the stress of adapting later, and train him to be an indoor cat now. You do NOT want to have to chase him down when you're at college, trying to have him be indoor-only, and he runs out when you open the door to go take a midterm.
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionken View Post
I may get a lot of flack for this but I do not know that indoor cats live longer then indoor/outdoor cats, I know they live longer then strictly outdoor cats. Indoor/outdoor cats are less likely to sleep all the time and also less likely to be obese. Cats need stimulation.
In any event, I allow my cats free reign to go out whenever they want. They have to be inside before bed time and before I go away for more then 3 hours. They have been eaisly trained to come when called.
My thoughts are that there is nothing wrong with cats feeling grass on their feet and wind on their whiskers as well as expeiencing the smells.
I guess I am lucky because I have never had a cat not come back and all have lived reasonably long happy lives
Whatever you decide is right
Thank you, thank you, optionken for this. Growing up we always had indoor/outdoor cats, never had a litter box, and all were happy. One or two died by car accident, and those were heartbreaking. We also lost them in ways unrelated to their being outdoors, like being 21 years of age.

I moved into my own place, got 2 kittens, kept them in forever, and they didn't seem unhappy, but they didn't try to go out. The male sprayed all over the house, later the female peed and defecated all over the house.

They are now gone. We've taken in strays who insisted on going out, and taught indoor kitties how much fun going out is. There are 3 kids living here, and due to the nature of my childcare business, folks coming in and out much during the day. The door is always opening.

I brought in a feral older kitten last year. She has not stepped outside since that day. But she sniffs the other 2 cats to death when they come in - it's like she wants to live vicariously through them. I KNOW she's bored, and would probably truly enjoy the outdoors, but she's a scaredy, and doesn't even try. I will keep her in, and safe, but I feel sorry for her.

Like yours, mine have easily been trained to come when called, and I ensure that they're in at night. Dusty stays very close, Mickey hunts a little further away, but he comes when called (unless he's occupied with prey).

In my heart, I KNOW they are way safer inside. But Mickey would climb the walls. He has sprayed inside, and I'm sure it would escalate, especially due to the kitties who can't seem to stay out of our yard.

I realize we are in the minority on this site (and I LOVE this site!) for feeling this way, but like you said, they love the feel of grass under their feet, too. We don't have the resources to build an enclosure; my husband probably wouldn't anyway.

So, to the original poster: yeah, going to a dorm, you almost have no choice but to keep the little guy in. And I applaud you for it. Good luck in school!
post #23 of 23
Originally I had planned to have my new cat be indoors when I was at home and be outdoors when I was at work or away from home.What helped me decide to keep her as an indoor cat was:1)now that I`m super attatched to my new kitten I can`t bear the idea of her maybe getting hurt or killed... 2)the fact that she was a natural with the litterbox and uses it for urination and defacation... 3)(and was my biggest worry!) I`ve had virtually no allergic symptoms since my kitten has been living indoors.Funny,but the allergy thing was always what kept me from being a cat owner in the first place. I`m glad I took veteran members` advice and made my cat an indoors one.She`s surprised me with how well she`s adjusted and how comfortable she is in "her" new place.

I guess in the end it is up to the individual cat owner(an oxymoron?)and what works the best for his/her situation?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Health
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › In or Out?