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Apt complex "requires" declawing - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by littleraven7726 View Post
My sister recently moved out of the Twin Cities. It's very difficult to find rental housing there that does not require declawing.
Very odd, in a city known for its liberal politics.
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatMom2Wires View Post
Managers come and go. The next one may not be so nice. Best to get the contract and make the specific changes if you don't want to avoid making a "quick move" in the middle of exams...
Yes but surely even if a new manager starts working there, she isn't going to send employees to all of a sudden check and make sure all the cats are declawed in all the apartments! They just usually don't do that kind of thing. They even don't check to make sure that people who aren't paying pet rent really don't have pets! I know many people who don't pay pet rent but still have pets as long as they are indoor only and aren't seen. And even if the complex employees come in to fix something inside the apartment, they most definitely don't take out the contract and decide to find ways in which you're breaching it since they aren't there for that..
That's what I think, I'd be Extremely surprised if out of all the rules in the contract they all of a sudden decide to strictly enforce the declawing rule and actually try to get proof from everyone who has cats.
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
Very odd, in a city known for its liberal politics.
We lived in a couple of bigger cities that had similar policies. The bigger cities have more large management companies, and that seems to be something the management companies require. The area I've lived in the longest (we moved back here a couple years ago) the landlords don't really care about the declawing, except for a couple fancy expensive complexes in town. But if you're going to pay their super high rent, you might as well buy your own house (which is what we did ).
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
Very odd, in a city known for its liberal politics.
Honestly though, when you have a bunch of tenants who take 0 responsibility for their apartments, I can understand where the landlords are coming from. In their experience, they've met a ton of irresponsible owners who let their cats tear apart the carpet, so they're taking action to protect their property.

I live in an apartment that requires declawing (which is why I chose to adopt an older kitty who was already declawed), and my neighbors in general are a bunch of irresponsible doofuses. They let their dogs poop all over the property and don't clean it up. They leave cigarette butts in the hallway. Their kids regularly run around the courtyard at 11 pm screaming and will occasionally pull the fire alarm for fun.

I know *I* would provide my cat with a safe place to scratch, but I can imagine quite a few of my neighbors wouldn't care less.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by rahma View Post
Honestly though, when you have a bunch of tenants who take 0 responsibility for their apartments, I can understand where the landlords are coming from. In their experience, they've met a ton of irresponsible owners who let their cats tear apart the carpet, so they're taking action to protect their property.

I live in an apartment that requires declawing (which is why I chose to adopt an older kitty who was already declawed), and my neighbors in general are a bunch of irresponsible doofuses. They let their dogs poop all over the property and don't clean it up. They leave cigarette butts in the hallway. Their kids regularly run around the courtyard at 11 pm screaming and will occasionally pull the fire alarm for fun.

I know *I* would provide my cat with a safe place to scratch, but I can imagine quite a few of my neighbors wouldn't care less.
The apartment he got has hardwood floors, unless it already comes furnished there is literally nothing that the cats can scratch up!! Are they going to scratch up the walls? Cats don't do that! And walls don't get damaged by claws.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
The apartment he got has hardwood floors, unless it already comes furnished there is literally nothing that the cats can scratch up!! Are they going to scratch up the walls? Cats don't do that! And walls don't get damaged by claws.

I'm not commenting on his specific situation, merely the situation of apartments in the twin cities (where I live) and irresponsible tenants. I'm also not advocating declawing, but merely trying to understand why landlords often require declawing. And if ya'll had my neighbors, you may sympathize as well, lol.

What would be a better solution, IMHO, would be to require a pet deposit large enough to cover completely replacing the carpets and any other damage that pets could possibly cause.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
The apartment he got has hardwood floors, unless it already comes furnished there is literally nothing that the cats can scratch up!! Are they going to scratch up the walls? Cats don't do that! And walls don't get damaged by claws.
I didn't figure out that one of my cats prefers wood as a scratching surface until she scratched the door jams in my apartment. I lived in a different apartment with peeling paint, and the cats certainly made the paint peel faster! (Declawed cats would do this, too, though, and the problem there was the paint job.) Walls and doors and door-jams do get damaged by cats. Screens get damaged by cats. There are plenty of non-carpet items that do get damaged by cats.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
The apartment he got has hardwood floors, unless it already comes furnished there is literally nothing that the cats can scratch up!! Are they going to scratch up the walls? Cats don't do that! And walls don't get damaged by claws.
I have hardwood floors and I can show you where Bijou's claws have scratched them up just by running/chasing toys. I can show you a desk that Bijou has scratched just by jumping up on it.

Some cats do scratch up walls and door frames. Walls can most certainly get damaged by claws, so can vertical blinds get damaged, so can drapes that may come with the apartment get damaged, so can wall-to-wall carpeting get damaged.

By signing that lease as your family has advised, if anyone lodges a complaint against you for anything and the management decides they want you out they can indeed get you on that clause and force you out. Since you also are signing a lease, you are responsible for the full term of that lease whether you move out or not so if you have to move you could well be paying rent in two places until this first lease expires.

I, personally, would strike out the clause and get the landlord to initial it and then I know I would not have to worry.

As someone else has said, they may in future get a superintendent that doesn't like pets and may very well check out the animals living in their apartments to see if they comply. There are people out there nasty enough to do it so I don't think you can completely rely on someone saying, "yes, we have that clause but we never enforce it". IMO that's like playing Russian Roulette.
post #39 of 44
My HUD apartment complex has the same thing about declawing. I never turned in the paperwork back in 1998 and no one asked. My kelly spent ten years of her life here and minus vomiting at end of her life left no damage, clearly nothing claw related. Now my nine month old kitten he likes to stretch on corners and paint seems to fall off it parts. The paint job is old and shotty in parts so I cant say for sure how much he is responsible for verses wear and tear.
post #40 of 44
I think I would just not draw attention to it and hope that she's right that they dont enforce it. By changing the contract and making a big deal of it you are accepting that you knew it was in the contract. The only way I can see it being a problem is if there is any damage, so as long as you keep their claws trim and have a scratching post I can't see how they'd ever know.

I don't know how your lease works, but we have had to pay a deposit on all our rented houses, and part of the contracts have required flea treatment (£50) or carpet cleaning (£250), and we also got charge £50 when Delilah scratched a piece of carpet the landlord left loose after fixing the radiator!
It can be an expensive job in terms of deposits, but I definately wouldn't get the cats declawed.

Do you know anyone else in the building with cats?
post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawGuy View Post
The manager did seem to understand my concern. She is a cat owner too. She did mention as I might have said, that other residents of the complex who have cats are against declawing like me, so I take it that I'm not the first person who verified that this wasn't going to be an issue with her.
I would say as long as no one is requiring proof of the cat being declawed they are not going to enforce this rule unless you need work done in your appartment & they find damage done by the cats.

I consider myself lucky because I've had 3 differnt landlords over the last 10 years. They all knew about my cats & nothing has ever been mentioned about declawing. Since all of my cats are adults, I would do my best to get my vet to write a letter saying it was dangerous & inhumane to declaw. Otherwise if the landlord pushed the issue I would be forced to move out (which would be dumb on his part considering I've been a good tenant in that building for 10 years & I've always paid my rent on time.)
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I have hardwood floors and I can show you where Bijou's claws have scratched them up just by running/chasing toys. I can show you a desk that Bijou has scratched just by jumping up on it.

Some cats do scratch up walls and door frames. Walls can most certainly get damaged by claws, so can vertical blinds get damaged, so can drapes that may come with the apartment get damaged, so can wall-to-wall carpeting get damaged.
I completely agree. Cats can and will damage walls, doors, door frames, floors, cabinets, trim work, etc. if they are allowed to do so. Nothing is off limits to them.

We have had our cats peel the paper back off the drywall in the cattery. The door frames get scratched, etc.

Of course that is a cattery situation, in a home situation those actions can be re-directed by the attentive owner. However, given the opportunity cats will be destructive.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
The apartment he got has hardwood floors, unless it already comes furnished there is literally nothing that the cats can scratch up!! Are they going to scratch up the walls? Cats don't do that! And walls don't get damaged by claws.
I beg to differ. My boyfriends cat has ruined TWO doorframes from scratching them-- but with a scratching post the damage is minimized.
post #44 of 44
Thread Starter 
I'm just going to get them soft paws. I'm going to alternate the colors on their nails in a pattern of red, yellow, red, yellow, etc. (University of Minnesota colors - assuming that's where I go (assuming I don't get off the wait list at Vanderbilt or Duke).
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