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Ear Tufts On DSH Cats?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Do you have a cat, or cats, with ear tufts?

I am refering to DSH's, not breeds specifically known for them.

Taz, our big, orange, 11 year old, indoor, neutered tom has them.

He is 19 to 20 pounds and is big, not very fat.

He has ear tufts 3/8 to 1/2 inch long (won't hold still for measuring )

He showed up here at 12 weeks of age so I don't know the "lineage", he is just about the size of a Maine Coon but I don't think he is one.

When he showed up, his tail was injured and infected so the vet had to amputate it, leaving a Lynx or Bobcat sized tail, the ear tufts add to this general "wild cat" appearance Look deceive thought, he's as domestic as they get.
post #2 of 13
Zane has small tufts. (They don't really show on the picture.)
post #3 of 13
Rocky has small tufts; he's the black, gray and white tabby and the tufts can be seen in his photo.
post #4 of 13
Yes they do, but they are not DSH's
post #5 of 13
*lol's at ATB*

There's a DSH at work (Petsmart) up for adoption, who has very nice, big tufts. He looks so...exotic...<3
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claydust View Post
Do you have a cat, or cats, with ear tufts?

I am refering to DSH's, not breeds specifically known for them.

Taz, our big, orange, 11 year old, indoor, neutered tom has them.

He is 19 to 20 pounds and is big, not very fat.

He has ear tufts 3/8 to 1/2 inch long (won't hold still for measuring )

He showed up here at 12 weeks of age so I don't know the "lineage", he is just about the size of a Maine Coon but I don't think he is one.

When he showed up, his tail was injured and infected so the vet had to amputate it, leaving a Lynx or Bobcat sized tail, the ear tufts add to this general "wild cat" appearance Look deceive thought, he's as domestic as they get.
I want to see him. Can you post a picture?
post #7 of 13
My baby has ear tufts. But his appearance is just overall...strange. His entire body is short hair, but he has longer hair under his ears that wraps around to under his chest, on his belly, and his tail looks like a DLH tail. I call it his squirrel tail. Strangest types of fur I've ever seen. That's what you get from a mix of God only knows what street kitty, .
post #8 of 13
Pumpkin has them... but she's an alley cat, so it's anybody's guess as to what random collection of breeds she comes from.

post #9 of 13
Most of ours have them, but they are all rescued barn cats, and a bobcat DID mate with a few of the females about 8 years ago. About 1/2 of the barn cats also have cropped tails or no tails.

edit: you can't really tell from my siggy because they are all pics from when they were younger, but Corky, Missy, Monster and Little One have tufts, Harley and Gizmo don't. Also, of the 4 with tufts, the only one that has a full tail is Monster.
post #10 of 13
Sassy is the only one of mine that has ear tufts. They are quite cute and make him look very handsome.
post #11 of 13
Yes.... Siddha is my little DSH orange tabby boy and he has awesome ear tufts! Sometimes I tease him and call him Bat-Cat. Bodhi, OTOH, is supposedly full Maine Coon and he barely has any at all on top of his ears.
post #12 of 13
I had a yellow DSH named Taz when I was a little girl! He had ear tufts too. But he was pretty small, maybe seven pounds, he was long and skinny.
post #13 of 13

I have three cats all with very hairy ears, but all coming from the "inside" of the ear "dish."  This is a cold weather adaptation.  Our boys were brought in to be house cats from the woods in central Minnesota where the winter temperatures can be well below zero Fahrenheit.

 

My theory on the function of tufts on cats ears (like the Lynx) is that it is an adaptation to aid in locating and tracking prey or carrion based on smell.

Unlike whiskers, which have a small cross-sectional area and produce very little drag in wind, the tufts are very efficient at catching wind.  Having one tuft on each ear, along with a high degree of bi-lateral symmetry of the face allow the cat to quickly determine the upwind source direction of the wind at the time a scent is caught.

 

One large environment where this adaptation would be very useful would be the winters in the north woods.  There are times when it is very cold and the air is quite still.  In these conditions, scents to not bloom from the source as much, and determining direction of up-wind becomes much more difficult as there is little steady wind to make it readily apparent.

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