TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › ivermectin and dogs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

ivermectin and dogs

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
ok, so our family dog has managed to get mange and the vet has told us to give her 0.4mL orally of the ivermectin 1% injectable solution. she also told us that buying it from that office would cost a small fortune and to try to get it off the intenet. is this the same stuff as you would give to a horse? any help finding it would be helpful thankx in advance.
post #2 of 8
The percentage of ivermectin in a solution prepared for livestock will be different than what would even be safe for a smaller animal.

I strongly suggest you try getting another vet's opinion on this. As for where to get it - farm supply stores carry it. Just remember that it will be too strong for that use and you really should have a vet adjusting the dosage instead of risking it yourself.


ETA: Ivermectin for horses is 1.87% definitely too strong. Cattle use is supposedly 1% - but again get an second opinion.
Another thing I just thought of, why would the vet be more expensive? I got some for free to treat the earmites in Sherman's ears - were it expensive my vet wouldn't have done that.
post #3 of 8
Any 1% ivermectin will do. There isn't a dog specific/small animal specific ivermectin. Just get the bottle of 1% and use the 0.4cc dosage. Just be sure it is the 1% bottle to cattle and swine.

Quote:
ETA: Ivermectin for horses is 1.87% definitely too strong. Cattle use is supposedly 1% - but again get an second opinion.
Another thing I just thought of, why would the vet be more expensive? I got some for free to treat the earmites in Sherman's ears - were it expensive my vet wouldn't have done that.
The vet would be more expensive probably per injection because the person would be bringing their dog in potentially for the injection, depending on how many are administered and you have to pay for their time to inject the solution, plus the cost of the injection itself.

Also if they are going to go through a whole bottle buying the bottle from the vet clinic is the bottle cost + whatever the vet clinic tacks on. So a $20.00 bottle could end up costing like $50 depending on their mark up. It would be way cheaper to purchase it from an online store or feed store to get the product at as close to cost as possible.
post #4 of 8
It's not being injected, though. It's being given orally, which would make it just as easy for the vet sell the medicine since they've already seen the dog.

Maybe the reason why it's cheaper where I live and was free from the vet (and this was several doses, not just one) is because I live in a rural area and the vet does do large and small animals. They also tend not to do large markups like that on most things either - and let people keep balances of $200+ and make payments. Guess it's more old fashioned.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Maybe the reason why it's cheaper where I live and was free from the vet (and this was several doses, not just one) is because I live in a rural area and the vet does do large and small animals. They also tend not to do large markups like that on most things either - and let people keep balances of $200+ and make payments. Guess it's more old fashioned.
Hahaha i just saw the orally part. But for the vet to give it they would probably inject it. I also imagine to give it orally there would be a charge because it's pretty easy to give a liquid med orally and the vet has to have a tech draw it up and give it thusly paying someone to do it. We have a vet around here who does large and small animals and he's easy on the pocket book but from working in a small animal clinic I know we mark stuff up big time. Like I think a bottle of quikstop for trimming nails costs us .99 cents and we charge $9 for it! It's insane!
post #6 of 8
I bought it from www.jefferspet.com . Yes, the 1% cattle version, and you do use it orally in dogs (it could be injected, but orally is easier for most pet owners). Beware, though---it's VERY bitter and your dog won't be happy. But only .4cc should go down fairly easily.

Be sure to order a couple syringes with needles (if legal in your state, otherwise have your vet give them to you) so you can get the Ivomec out of the bottle, and a lot of tuberculin 1cc syringes without needles for dosing. That will make everything much easier. It's hard to measure .4 cc in a 3cc syringe.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plebayo View Post
We have a vet around here who does large and small animals and he's easy on the pocket book but from working in a small animal clinic I know we mark stuff up big time. Like I think a bottle of quikstop for trimming nails costs us .99 cents and we charge $9 for it! It's insane!
I honestly think doing that to one's customers isn't right. Sure one needs to make a profit, but if any customers get wise to how they're being ripped off it can be bad for a businesses reputation.
This is probably why I went back to that vet. They're not ideal there but they're more honest.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
I honestly think doing that to one's customers isn't right. Sure one needs to make a profit, but if any customers get wise to how they're being ripped off it can be bad for a businesses reputation.
This is probably why I went back to that vet. They're not ideal there but they're more honest.
It's not exactly a matter of being honest or dishonest. You can sell a product for whatever amount of money you want to sell it at. My horse vet marks up his product. It's $18 for me to buy a tube of bute from him, $7 if I order it myself. To buy 500 cimetidine tablets it costs $40 when i can order it for $15.00. Everyone does it so when my horse vet comes out I tell him, I'll send in blood work myself and if I need meds I'll buy them elsewhere.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cats and Other Animals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › ivermectin and dogs