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Ow!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I seem to have pinched my sciatic nerve - I was putting together my son's new bed and bent over and have been in pain since. I have taken a voltaren (antiinflammatory) and some panadol (tylenol) but this morning it is so sore!

What do you do for the sciatic nerve pain?

Thanks for any tips!
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwideus View Post
I seem to have pinched my sciatic nerve - I was putting together my son's new bed and bent over and have been in pain since. I have taken a voltaren (antiinflammatory) and some panadol (tylenol) but this morning it is so sore!

What do you do for the sciatic nerve pain?

Thanks for any tips!
Ice and/or heat is really the only thing that eases mine.

Heat is weird, because usually you don't want to heat inflammation, but it works for me by relaxing the muscles/tendons/nerves.

Another suggestion, go for a massage if you can. My RMT is awesome.... I have sciatic issues once-twice a year, but I seem to regularly pull something in my neck/shoulder.... my RMT can "fix it" so I can actually move my neck and minimal pain
post #3 of 14
I take anti-inflammitories for a few days till the inflammation is better. Ice can help some.

There's not really much else you can do. Any sort of physical therapy/stretching isn't advised when there's a lot of inflammation. When it does get better you should try to get in a routine for stretching and strengthening your core and also make sure you are forcing yourself to bend and lift properly. Other than that... you live with it.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks - that makes sense. I have heard that once you have done something to your sciatic nerve, issues will always crop up. Just great.

I will take some more antiinflammatories and rest - when I get home from work that is.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwideus View Post
Thanks - that makes sense. I have heard that once you have done something to your sciatic nerve, issues will always crop up. Just great.
Mostly that's because back problems never go away. If you've not had your back checked out yet, you should. You may have a bulging disc in there which could be ruptured if you do something bad (lift improperly, twisting motions). Going that route, you could get a prescription for physical therapy which could really help you a lot in preventing future issues. You would also be taught how to move and lift correctly.

Make sure you eat when you take an anti-inflammitory. You'll be taking them for a few days, at least, and you don't what to tear up your stomach.

I hope the inflammation settles down and you get to feeling better.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
Mostly that's because back problems never go away. If you've not had your back checked out yet, you should. You may have a bulging disc in there which could be ruptured if you do something bad (lift improperly, twisting motions). Going that route, you could get a prescription for physical therapy which could really help you a lot in preventing future issues. You would also be taught how to move and lift correctly.

Make sure you eat when you take an anti-inflammitory. You'll be taking them for a few days, at least, and you don't what to tear up your stomach.

I hope the inflammation settles down and you get to feeling better.
The pain is in my left side above my butt down to my leg - that is the sciatic nerve, isn't it? I can't sit down for too long or it will hurt.
post #7 of 14
Well.. "sciatic nerve" is a little bit misleading. There is no actual sciatic nerve/sciatica, it's just a term to describe pain into your legs. Also, there's more than one nerve, at every level (vertebrae) there are nerves that come out on either side. These branches go all the way down and innervate different areas. Depending on the state of ones back, either a disc (what cushions your vertebrae) or one of the joints can press on part of a nerve. Generally when there's arthritis/DDD in one's back, it's a combination of both because one leads to the other. (this is a very simplified explanation, by the way)

Given your description I would guess that L4-L5 and/or L5-S1 are involved. Of course this is a safe guess on my part, something like 85% of bulges and herniations occur there. So if you get an MRI in the future, don't be surprised to hear that you have bulging discs in this area. All you can do is take care of your back. If you are starting down the path of DDD, you can't stop it - it's part of life and aging. You can however slow down damage somewhat and prevent yourself from really messing things up.

I suggest you, and anyone else with back issues, read up a little on how the spine is made up, how the nerves run, and common problems with it. Look at anatomy diagrams..

This is a very basic site with some info about back problems http://www.spine-health.com/

Also, before anyone suggests it or you get the idea yourself. Don't go to a chiropractor, you don't know how your back looks right now. If you have a very bulging disc any "adjustments" could rupture or tear it.

Clicking around and noticed this - http://www.spine-health.com/blog/pai...ommon-mistakes
Some very good advice there. Personally I have a very good spine specialist, while my back has been better for treatment, if it gets worse I can always call him and get an appointment.
post #8 of 14
Aw Kellye, BUMMER. I hope it's not a bigger problem, and that in a few days you'll feel like new!

Laurie
post #9 of 14
Having had that problem myself, my advice is to see a good chiropractor. I know how much pain you must be in, so loads of healing vibes coming your way
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by libby74 View Post
Having had that problem myself, my advice is to see a good chiropractor.
I know you mean well, but as I pointed out earlier she doesn't yet know what is wrong with her back.
Do you know what happens if too much force is exerted on a bulging disc? If can herniate, when this happens the fluid that is normally contained inside that disc goes out onto the nerves around it. They become very inflamed and there's not much relief to be found from it. That inflammation and irritation from the fluid can lead to scarring on the nerves which then creates a permanent problem. (Note, I already have a torn leaking disc. I dread the day this eventually happens to me. )

Then there's spondylothesis, which is a whole different problem where "adjusting" anything in the spine can lead to serious problems, even one becoming paralyzed if the spondylothesis is bad enough to begin with.

So many of us have back pain or know someone that does that we accept it as something normal and mostly just an annoyance instead of a sign that we need to get proper medical assessment and treatment for it. This goes for a lot of other health problems, too! We don't suggest people self treat their pets, so it's rather wrong to suggest they self treat themselves without so much as a proper diagnosis.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
I know you mean well, but as I pointed out earlier she doesn't yet know what is wrong with her back.
Do you know what happens if too much force is exerted on a bulging disc? If can herniate, when this happens the fluid that is normally contained inside that disc goes out onto the nerves around it. They become very inflamed and there's not much relief to be found from it. That inflammation and irritation from the fluid can lead to scarring on the nerves which then creates a permanent problem. (Note, I already have a torn leaking disc. I dread the day this eventually happens to me. )

Then there's spondylothesis, which is a whole different problem where "adjusting" anything in the spine can lead to serious problems, even one becoming paralyzed if the spondylothesis is bad enough to begin with.

So many of us have back pain or know someone that does that we accept it as something normal and mostly just an annoyance instead of a sign that we need to get proper medical assessment and treatment for it. This goes for a lot of other health problems, too! We don't suggest people self treat their pets, so it's rather wrong to suggest they self treat themselves without so much as a proper diagnosis.
You have given some really good advice - my back is still hurting quite bad - so I plan to make an appointment with the doctor on Monday if it doesn't get better over the weekend (today is Friday so it is a bit late to make an appointment now)
post #12 of 14
Good luck. I hope the worst you hear is that it's just minor DDD - we all get this and with proper care of our backs, can live with it. My DH recently had problems with his back, and as I expected it was L4-L5 and L5-S1 disc bulges. He did get better with an anti-inflammatory and some rest. As that site I linked to suggests though, a little rest helps but you still need to stay active.

That it's nothing worse and you can get a good treatment plan to help with this.

You may also want to look at the recent mattress thread. A good bed helps a lot.
post #13 of 14
I hope you're feeling better soon, Kellye!
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Actually, I am feeling better today - just a twinge every now and then - at least I am walking normally!
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