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What you think of purebred rescues that save cats from bad breeders?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
They are purebred cats from kitten mill,byb,ect.
Some are Cfa registered.
I have been thinking of adopting one from there because they had a bad start in life.
They are very strict who they adopt to which is good.
Some are special needs kittens/cats.
Some have defects from not being bred right.
One of the vet techs told me about this place.
The vet told me Sasha my mostly Russian Blue was one of the healthiest cats they ever saw.
She and her brother were the only kittens that lived out of a litter of 6.
She was worth the 2 hour drive.
Some of the cats are munchkins.
post #2 of 17
If I was looking for a pedigree cat as a pet, I'd choose the rescue groups. But all my pedigrees were bought to be show cats (most were and did well). For the pets, I adopt mixed breeds
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mews2much View Post
They are purebred cats from kitten mill,byb,ect.
Some are Cfa registered.
I have been thinking of adopting one from there because they had a bad start in life.
They are very strict who they adopt to which is good.
Some are special needs kittens/cats.
Some have defects from not being bred right.
One of the vet techs told me about this place.
The vet told me Sasha my mostly Russian Blue was one of the healthiest cats they ever saw.
She and her brother were the only kittens that lived out of a litter of 6.
She was worth the 2 hour drive.
Some of the cats are munchkins.






They need good homes too!!

I think it's great your thinking of adopting one of these cats.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks,
I have been told some of them are show quality.
I got Oreo because she has fcks.
The vet told em I am lucky she lived as a kitten.
I told the person if she lives I would take her.
That was worth the 2 hour drive also.
Oreo just had xrays the other day and her heart is tilted and her bones are not shaped right still.
Her lungs are smaller also.
They said her heart is fine though so I am happy.
She does have bronchitis right now and might have asthma.
Not many people know much about fcks.
post #5 of 17
Hi,

how exactly are these kittens from the kitten mill rescued? Are the kitten mills closed down in the process?

Do they test the cats for FIV/ leukaemia/ Giardia and keep them in a quaranteen for 1-2 weeks before re-homing?

How much would you know about the cat and its special needs or problems before you adopt? How long would they have been at a foster home before they come to you on average? Long enough for the foster mom to be able to judge the cats character?

How well are your own cats socialized and can they cope with a cat that probably isn't well socialized?

Generally speaking- yes, I'd consider taking such a cat, but only if the purebred rescue is doing its best to inform you exactly what you can expect from your new cat and what not and if they will try to help you with advice if things don't go smoothly in the beginning.


Christine
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
I am going to find out more about it.
I do know they are tested and fixed.
I would not takea cat/kitten that tests pos for anything.
I have had feral cats before.
I used to save them.
I gave that up because I can not risk bringing a sick cat into my house.
Coco and Meeko have lived wth feral cats before taht we saved and we would always find the ferals trying to nurse on Coco.
The price is 175-200.
I know my sister wants to get one once she is not in a apartment.
post #7 of 17
Both of mine are exactly from this situation... Lucky and Bugsy... I can not imagine my life without my babies anymore, and will be forever grateful for my rescue lady.
Lucky was rescued from a shelter, abandoned by a breeder that went down - she was going to be PTS in a few days. Bugsy was from a breeder that says sje is a reputable breeder, but I think she was a BYB. She surrended Bugsy and 3 of his litter mates to my rescuer. They we both tested, and vaccinated. I signed a contract for both of them that looks very similar to the breeder's contract, including health guarantees, and forbidding me to declaw, to re-home, and to PTS. Instead I need to return them to the rescuer.
Bugsy came up with dental problems, and she offered me to take him back and replace for another kitty, which obviously is not going to happen.
I love my babies, and highly recommend anyone to adopt from such rescue situation!!
post #8 of 17
Hi,

why does your sister want to get one? Has she got a lot of experience with cats and could she cope with a sick or difficult cat? Would she be OK if it doesn't turn out to be a lap cat or if it died after a while due to its health issues (say if it had a severe case of HCM).

I'm not trying to say that your sis wouldn't be able to cope plus she'd have you to help her in a chrisis but as these cats will have been through a lot it is more likely that they might be disturbed and need some time to recover and relate to their owner- which is something you must be aware of and have the time to deal with.

If your shy and unsecure kitty then does start putting its trust in you it's all the more rewarding , or if the moggy starts to put on weight and is visably happier. But who am I telling this to , your Orea seems to have gotten over the flat chested kitten syndrom and you took her knowingly.


By the way- I'd also get FIV+/ leukaemia + cats if I didn't have cats already

Christine
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
I would be the one that takes a cat with problems.
My sister wold not take a cat with problems.
I do not live near her but my brother does and he has saved ferals before.
She has a cat and a dog.
Carolina I am glad you saved both your cats.
My Meeko almost died before I got her.
I got a phone call saying her sister was dead and that she was very bad.
I called my husband and he rushed over there and took her to the er vet.
I found out she had a heart murmur then and I still took her knowing that.
She also had severe anemia and almost needed blood.
She was 3 months at the time and will be 9 in June.
If a cat something that my cats can catch then I will not adopt it.
I can not take that chance.
My Sister has been around feral cats before.
post #10 of 17
Hi,

if your sister wouldn't opt for a cat with problems- why is she then thinking of adopting a purebred rescue cat?

Maybe she would be better of with either a healthy kitty from a normal shelter or private dsh litter or from a responsible breeder.

Mind you- there's nothing wrong with wanting a healty and problemfree cat , but with a purebred rescue this might not be the case.


Christine
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
I will have to ask her.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjh27 View Post
Hi,

if your sister wouldn't opt for a cat with problems- why is she then thinking of adopting a purebred rescue cat?

Maybe she would be better of with either a healthy kitty from a normal shelter or private dsh litter or from a responsible breeder.

Mind you- there's nothing wrong with wanting a healty and problemfree cat , but with a purebred rescue this might not be the case.


Christine
And why not??? They need homes too! Just because they are purebred rescues, doesn't mean they have health problems. Any cat can have health problems, and ALL cats need a home.
I don't understand why you seem to be so against this type of adoption?
What is the difference from adopting a kitty from a shelter, or from a rescue group? If anything, in a rescue situation, they are kept cage free, and chances are they have been worked on socialization, and health issues.
Adopting a kitty is a great thing, no matter where that kitty is coming from - you are giving a kitty an opportunity for a happy and healthy life. Kudos to anybody who adopts a cat, from the streets, shelters, or rescues!
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjh27 View Post
Hi,

if your sister wouldn't opt for a cat with problems- why is she then thinking of adopting a purebred rescue cat?

Maybe she would be better of with either a healthy kitty from a normal shelter or private dsh litter or from a responsible breeder.

Mind you- there's nothing wrong with wanting a healty and problemfree cat , but with a purebred rescue this might not be the case.


Christine
Any purebred, moggie from the street, or purebred rescued from a bad situation can have health or behavioral issues.

We have had many wonderful purebred cats without any issues come through the shelter here.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
I know peoplethatgot from purebred rescues andthey did not haveany problems.
It depends on the kitten/cat.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjh27 View Post
Hi,

if your sister wouldn't opt for a cat with problems- why is she then thinking of adopting a purebred rescue cat?

Maybe she would be better of with either a healthy kitty from a normal shelter or private dsh litter or from a responsible breeder.

Mind you- there's nothing wrong with wanting a healty and problemfree cat , but with a purebred rescue this might not be the case.


Christine
Shelters can also have cats with health/behavioral issues as well. Just because a cat comes from a "pure bred rescue" doesn't mean it will have health/behavioral issues. Many of their cats can be owner surrenders or young kittens not yet affected by a mill situation, or even rescued FROM a shelter. Many rescues do temperment testing and will socialize cats needing it. They try to match the right cat with the right homes and tell you if a cat is special needs or not and any known problems the cat may have. They will not let a person take a special needs cat if they do not feel it will work out in their particular situation. They know many times that the animal has had a bad start and want nothing more then to see them end up in forever homes and happy, not returned or adandoned possibley some day because they weren't the right home for that cat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
And why not??? They need homes too! Just because they are purebred rescues, doesn't mean they have health problems. Any cat can have health problems, and ALL cats need a home.
I don't understand why you seem to be so against this type of adoption?
What is the difference from adopting a kitty from a shelter, or from a rescue group? If anything, in a rescue situation, they are kept cage free, and chances are they have been worked on socialization, and health issues.
Adopting a kitty is a great thing, no matter where that kitty is coming from - you are giving a kitty an opportunity for a happy and healthy life. Kudos to anybody who adopts a cat, from the streets, shelters, or rescues!

Exactly!!!
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
These rescues are very strict.
There are over 200 questions on the form.
A cat from a breeder or the pound can have problems also.
You never know until you get the cat/kitten.
When we adopted from the pound there was alot of questions they ask and you had to pass.
We also got to go in a room and meet the pet.
We adopted a German Shorthair Pointer from the pound when she was 1.5 years old.
She died at age 15.5 years old.
Alot of cats from pounds also have uri's.
They do not give special needs cats to anyone.
post #17 of 17
i think it's really good that there are groups willing to take them on to give them that chance of a good home - yes, there will be some with health and behaviour issues, but just the same as if you got a cat from a rescue that had been in a bad situation. A reputable group will assess all the cats and only let them go to a suitable home - i know a pedigree rescue in the UK that does a fantastic job and actually helps more pedigrees a year than we do moggies, which is a scary thought.
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