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Veterinary Dental Cleaning

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My cat is almost 9 years old and has buildup on her back teeth. The Vet says she should get some dental care. I know this to be true. I am just a bit leery about putting her under the anesthesia. One time, one of the Vets heard something slightly irregular with my cat's heart, so I took her for a professional ultrasound, which found nothing wrong. However, I still don't really know if there is something there to be careful of.

I explained that to my current Vet, who said they can use different medications that will be gentler on the heart if that is an issue. They would, of course, do the best they could to make sure she is ok.

We had a family cat years ago who died at 13, back then dental care for animals just wasn't promoted as it is now. He might've lived longer if we had cared for this. So why am I so nervous? I guess it's just something we all would be nervous about for our cats, as we would for people, right?
post #2 of 14
I felt the same way about my Minka. She is a verrrry tiny cat and was 10 years old when she had her teeth cleaned.

Anesthesia is always risky with your pets, just as it is with humans.

Minka did just fine. I was sooo glad I did it, too. Her personality improved immediately and she became so spunky and much happier. I think her teeth were bothering her!

There is a risk, too, if you don't do the surgery. You could shorten her life span by raising her risk for kidney disease and other problems from the plaque buildup getting into her bloodstream.
post #3 of 14
Both of my kitties are going in on the 27th for a cleaning and I'm really nervous. Frankie is almost 11 and she had her's cleaned 2 years ago too and did just fine. WIckett is only 4 and it's his first time. I'm going to start brushing his so this doesn't become a regular thing but Frankie is too old to learn new grooming routines I think... and she's not as patient about being pestered.

The vet knows your concerns so it's really your choice. There is always risk involved but you have to weigh it out. I'd go ahead with it and consider a brushing routine after to prevent/minamize further cleanings.
post #4 of 14
Make sure you opt to have the pre-surgery lab work. They'll test blood levels and such to make sure it's safe to have the anesthesia and/or adjust what anesthesia they'll use.

I took my 13yo cat who has kidney problems in last Friday and she did very well. She was starving when she came out from the anesthesia, so they went ahead and gave her some crunchies, which is very unusual as they don't normally feed them after surgery (same day pickup), but she must've really been raising a ruckus! LOL Our little 4 yo girl needs to go have her teeth cleaned as well. She's not had them done in about 2 years.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much for your input everyone. I know it's something I should do for my cat's health. Our family cat died of kidney disease. If I realize that her tooth decay is slowly poisoning her, then I know what I need to do...the Vet just took bloodwork of my cat on Monday, so she suggested we do the dental work within 30 days or else she would need to take the bloodwork again.

When I took her to the Vet today she was shaking in her carrier, so I really hate having to take her out of the house...but her health is involved.
post #6 of 14
My cat has a 3/4 heart murmur and she had surgery last Jan and was ok.
It was not a dental.
She had all the tests before the surgery.
post #7 of 14
Regarding the anesthesia, they do not put them completely out to do dental work at my vet. It's a lighter level of anesthesia, similar to when people get dental work and they put them into a "twilight" sleep.
post #8 of 14
My cat that I just took to the vet last week shivers, too. However, after she's had the drugs, anesthesia & pain meds if needed, she shivers no more!!
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anjhest View Post
I felt the same way about my Minka. She is a verrrry tiny cat and was 10 years old when she had her teeth cleaned.

Anesthesia is always risky with your pets, just as it is with humans.

Minka did just fine. I was sooo glad I did it, too. Her personality improved immediately and she became so spunky and much happier. I think her teeth were bothering her!

There is a risk, too, if you don't do the surgery. You could shorten her life span by raising her risk for kidney disease and other problems from the plaque buildup getting into her bloodstream.
It helps me to realize that my cat may actually be suffering already from the effects of bad teeth and just can't tell me. I'm so glad to hear that your cat had such relief after her teeth cleaning....I've done some more research, too, about anesthesia and how it has improved so much within the past 20 years, and I am feeling a little better about things. Now just to make the appointment and save her health!

She has been acting leery of me ever since two Vet visits in one week. Hopefully after the cleaning is over with, she won't have to go back for quite a while. I sure wish they could understand.
post #10 of 14
Mattie needs this done and she's only about 2-3 years old. Her teeth were bad when I adopted her.

I'm curious, how much is everyone paying for this? I called the local vet school and they charge $600! I'm wondering if maybe the person I spoke to was mistaken...because that just is really high. I was expecting something more like $250. I haven't asked my normal vet what she charges, I assumed the vet school would be less expensive.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sakura View Post
Mattie needs this done and she's only about 2-3 years old. Her teeth were bad when I adopted her.

I'm curious, how much is everyone paying for this? I called the local vet school and they charge $600! I'm wondering if maybe the person I spoke to was mistaken...because that just is really high. I was expecting something more like $250. I haven't asked my normal vet what she charges, I assumed the vet school would be less expensive.
I just checked, and I paid €91.37 ($115.60) in 2005 for the whole shebang, i.e., blood test, anesthesia, plaque removal, polishing, antibiotics). I'm sure the price has gone up in the mean time, but probably not by much.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sakura View Post
Mattie needs this done and she's only about 2-3 years old. Her teeth were bad when I adopted her.

I'm curious, how much is everyone paying for this? I called the local vet school and they charge $600! I'm wondering if maybe the person I spoke to was mistaken...because that just is really high. I was expecting something more like $250. I haven't asked my normal vet what she charges, I assumed the vet school would be less expensive.
For mine, the basic cleaning is $150 then extra for any necessary extractions etc.
post #13 of 14
The dental alone came out to less than $150.
post #14 of 14
It was only $150 when I had my dog's teeth done and he's more than double the size of the cat. I'd think bigger animal=more anesthetic=more money, so $600 seems either incorrect ot crazy, especially since it's being done by students. I work in a dental office (for humans ) and we refer people to the dental school if they can't afford us.
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