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Occasional cough...

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
My Sheba is 2.5 years old and has been very healthy. The last few days I've noticed an occasional "hacking cough" coming from "someone" (I'm usually upstairs and hear it happening downstairs.) It's just one or two hacks and stopped by the time I get downstairs.

This morning, Sheba came in the bathroom for her "dink-a-dink" (drink) from the bathroom sink. She usually meows as I ask her if she wants to be lifted, etc and I noticed her soprano voice was more like a tenor this morning. Later I heard a series of 5 hacks coming from her bed downstairs. I now had my answer.

She acts normal, is eating and drink normally as well. I'm thinking possibly a hairball????? so gave all the cats remedy for that this morning. I plan to observe her closely at this point.

Do you think I'm OK with waiting a day or two to see if it IS a hairball? The voice change is kind of concerning but I hate to take her in if it's just something viral that will run its course in a day or two. Of course if anything changes--behavior, eating, etc, I'll take her in right away.

Thanks,

Cally
post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally posted by CatMom2Wires
This morning, Sheba came in the bathroom for her "dink-a-dink" (drink) from the bathroom sink. She usually meows as I ask her if she wants to be lifted, etc and I noticed her soprano voice was more like a tenor this morning. Later I heard a series of 5 hacks coming from her bed downstairs. I now had my answer.
Well, according to the advice in this article
http://home.ivillage.com/pets/symsolve/0,,lk7v,00.html

the safest thing might be to call your vet for advice to find out if you should wait with this or have her seen. (She might have an upper respiratory infection for which your vet can prescribe an antibiotic.)
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Sheba has a chest infection and asthma. Took her in as soon as her appetite decreased. She got a shot of steroids and some Clavamox.

Cally
post #4 of 9
I'm so sorry your kitty has asthma. That's a serious disease that sometimes can become life-threatening. Have you discussed long-term treatment with your vet?
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Yes, we discussed it a bit this morning. He knows I'm an internet junkie and will research ad nauseum! However, he said since right now the air quality is just terrible here in Texas--drought conditions, high winds and REALLY BAD pollen counts--it may simply be that "something in the air" triggered her and the long acting steroids she got will be all she needs for quite some time to keep her comfy. If it doesn't resolve in a week, she is to come in for more in depth testing. In the future, I'm to call if she has an attack and we will treat it. I am a health care professional and have a stethoscope and will monitor her with that as well.

I'm assuming that after a certain point, if necessary, we will get into the inhalers, maintenance drugs, etc. I'm already researching holistic stuff such as fish oils to help her naturally control inflammation. Sheba already eats grain free/raw diet so that is good. I also already emailed my homeopathy practitioner who also is certified in animal homeopathy to send me some remedies to get that angle covered.

I am upset by this. Her bloodline (she is a pedigreed cat) has not been the healthiest--lots of kitten deaths, illnesses and her father recently succumbed to FIP. I'd been in hopes that Sheba had dodged the bad apple in her family tree, but looks like even she is having issues.

Thank you for your concern.

Cally
post #6 of 9
Cally, you have my best wishes for successful treatment.

Yes, air pollution, high pollen counts, etc, can cause very serious problems for kitties, incredibly, even for indoor kitties who never go outside. Fighting the reactions and trying to prevent them can be a difficult job.

I'm so glad you're turning to your homeopath for help. According to info I have, homeopathic remedies can actually help kitties become symptom-free.

Since you're already researching holistic remedies such as fish oils, hopefully this article will also be helpful to you.
http://www.peteducation.com/article....0+1448&aid=665

Acupuncture can also be a good way to treat asthma. According to a holistic vet who mentions the use of acupuncture in an article I have, acupuncture can be so effective that a properly placed needle can literally halt an asthma attack.

Harpsie's Website also mentions acupuncture, here is the link for you:
http://www.harpsie.com/asthma.htm

Again, best wishes to you and Sheba.
post #7 of 9
This might make you feel better.
My Coco has asthma and just turned 17.
If you need help with asthma I can help you.
You will have times when it gets real bad.
Allergies make the asthma worse also.
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the encouragement and information.

My daughter has/had millions of allergies so luckily my house is pretty "green." No carpets, non-toxic cleaning supplies, low dust litter, no perfumes, etc. We also run air purifiers 24/7--considering investing in a REALLY good one.

I talked to the breeder who gave me Sheba today (she's my neighbor.) She lost a cat to asthma complications a few months ago, and he was very old. She has another middle aged cat with asthma who does very well. I'm a stay at home cat mom (lol) so I should be able to keep and eagle eye and bat ear on her.

Here's a pic of my little darlin':



Thanks again,

Cally
post #9 of 9
Oh she is beautiful! What a sweet little face!
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