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wet food

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
my cat that passed was on innova dry adult cat food.

the cat i'm thinking of adopting is on wet food and has a bowl of dry at all times. it's nine lives or fancy feast. she receives wet food twice a day. i prefer to go with premium foods. i might try something other than innova.

is it wrong to even attempt to change a cat's diet to all dry, or to offer wet food only in the morning? how much would i be spending a month on wet food if i went for a premium brand like innova? is two times a day too much?
post #2 of 18
I'm guessing I spend about $40 on canned foods (twice a month) for the two of mine. They get dry in the morning, canned at night. I feed the premium brands as Charlie had a UTI and cannot be on the cheaper canned foods.

We feed Royal Canin for Urinary and in the canned I get Wellness, Blue Buffalo (Blue Spa), Natural Balance, Iams, and Max Cat. We feed mainly chicken, lamb, beef, venison in the canned - no fish like tuna/salmon.

All dry is not a good idea - cats need water and canned is really much better. Think about it - do cats eat dry food in the wild?
post #3 of 18
I agree with GK. IMO it is better to feed a quality wet and dry. I feed wet morning and night with 1/3 cup of dry for "snacking" on during the day/night. Wet food is healthier for kitties than dry.
post #4 of 18
Nutritionally speaking, dry food doesn't have all that much to offer a cat in the way of nutrients. It's plant based (grains) and a cat's physiological make up is such that it needs pure animal proteins in order to thrive. The carbs in it put on weight but it does little in the way of useful nutrition. It's why most cats and dogs are obese. Think of it this way, it's sort of like us eating a bag of potato chips everyday. Tastes good, yeah. Good for us? No. Just get you fat and give you pimples. Imagine what it would do to your body if you ate that every day of your life. As you can probably tell, I'm not a fan of kibble in any form. I do not feed it at all.

DWMeowMix
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWMeowMix View Post
Nutritionally speaking, dry food doesn't have all that much to offer a cat in the way of nutrients. It's plant based (grains) and a cat's physiological make up is such that it needs pure animal proteins in order to thrive. The carbs in it put on weight but it does little in the way of useful nutrition. It's why most cats and dogs are obese. Think of it this way, it's sort of like us eating a bag of potato chips everyday. Tastes good, yeah. Good for us? No. Just get you fat and give you pimples. Imagine what it would do to your body if you ate that every day of your life. As you can probably tell, I'm not a fan of kibble in any form. I do not feed it at all.

DWMeowMix
This information is not correct... If you talk about low quality food, which can come in both wet and dry, then yes, you are correct... However, there are plenty of high quality grain free foods in the market. The dry food I feed for example, is 75% human grade meat, and the carbs in it come from fruits and vegetables - the breakdown is close to what they get on the wild. No preservatives, no by-products, no artificial flavors.
The advantage of the wet food is the water content, that's about it.
I myself do not agree in feeding junk wet food; I believe food should be of good quality, no matter in what form it is fed.
My cats do not eat any wet - they refuse to it, so I bought a water fountain, and they drink a LOT of water. They easily drink far more than the minimum recommended quantity. If you go on all dry, make sure to get a nutritious and quality food, with no grains or at least no corn, and I would highly recommend a water fountain....
Good luck!
post #6 of 18
I think you need to feed what you think is best and what your cat does best on. I believed my boys were thriving on a grain free dry and pretty good quality wet--I was terribly mistaken after diving into a raw diet. They are completely different cats now--they are full of energy, their coats are gorgeous, the overall smell (both oral and body) is wonderful. I do not believe that a high quality dry (grain free) and a drinking fountain is sufficient--cats should be getting their moisture from what they eat.

Leslie
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
I think you need to feed what you think is best and what your cat does best on. I believed my boys were thriving on a grain free dry and pretty good quality wet--I was terribly mistaken after diving into a raw diet. They are completely different cats now--they are full of energy, their coats are gorgeous, the overall smell (both oral and body) is wonderful. I do not believe that a high quality dry (grain free) and a drinking fountain is sufficient--cats should be getting their moisture from what they eat.

Leslie
I agree with you, as long as it is nutritious wet food... Mine won't eat anything moist, including raw, so I need to play with what I get...
Being wet or dry makes a difference on the water content, but saying that dry foods are full of grains, and wet foods aren't is a long stretch...
There are plenty of wet foods out there that I would never ever in a million years feed to my cats... I wish I could do wet or raw, but I tried, and they will not eat AT ALL...
I guess it depends on the cats... I do recommend, if the kitty is on dry food, to have a water fountain.
While the recommended water amount is 5oz/day, my cats easily drink 10 oz each because of it... I am personally not worried about their water intake, as they are very good drinkers... but again, that is what works to my kitties... No cats are the same...
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
This information is not correct... If you talk about low quality food, which can come in both wet and dry, then yes, you are correct... However, there are plenty of high quality grain free foods in the market. The dry food I feed for example, is 75% human grade meat, and the carbs in it come from fruits and vegetables - the breakdown is close to what they get on the wild. No preservatives, no by-products, no artificial flavors.
The advantage of the wet food is the water content, that's about it.
I myself do not agree in feeding junk wet food; I believe food should be of good quality, no matter in what form it is fed.
My cats do not eat any wet - they refuse to it, so I bought a water fountain, and they drink a LOT of water. They easily drink far more than the minimum recommended quantity. If you go on all dry, make sure to get a nutritious and quality food, with no grains or at least no corn, and I would highly recommend a water fountain....
Good luck!
With all due respect, you might consider doing a little more research on the subject of cat nutrition. In dry foods cereals and protein "meals" are the primary ingredients next to what little dried meat they put into even the most premium cat foods. Grains are indigestable to cats and have next to no biological value. "Meal" consists of mostly the unusable parts of an animal mostly bone and is rendered or boiled down so anything that might have had any biological value to it is destroyed. The only real thing the more so called "premium" dry foods have going for it is that they do not use by-products which consist of but are not in any way limited to:

Quote:
Whatever remains of the carcass — heads, feet, bones, blood, intestines, lungs, spleens, livers, ligaments, fat trimmings, unborn babies, and other parts not generally consumed by humans — is used in pet food, animal feed, fertilizer, industrial lubricants, soap, rubber, and other products. These “other parts” are known as “by-products.” By-products are used in feed for poultry and livestock as well as in pet food.
Quote:
The better brands of pet food, such as many “super-premium,” “natural,” and “organic” varieties, do not use by-products. On the label, you’ll see one or more named meats among the first few ingredients, such as “turkey” or “lamb.” These meats are still mainly leftover scraps; in the case of poultry, bones are allowed, so “chicken” consists mainly of backs and frames—the spine and ribs, minus their expensive breast meat. The small amount of meat left on the bones is the meat in the pet food. Even with this less-attractive source, pet food marketers are very tricky when talking about meat, so this is explained further in the section on “Marketing Magic” below.

Meat meals, poultry meals, by-product meals, and meat-and-bone meal are common ingredients in dry pet foods. The term “meal” means that these materials are not used fresh, but have been rendered. While there are chicken, turkey, and poultry by-product meals there is no equivalent term for mammal “meat by-product meal” — it is called “meat-and-bone-meal.” It may also be referred to by species, such as “beef-and-bone-meal” or “pork-and-bone-meal.”

What is rendering? As defined by Webster’s Dictionary, to render is “to process as for industrial use: to render livestock carcasses and to extract oil from fat, blubber, etc., by melting.” In other words, raw materials are dumped into large vat and boiled for several hours. Rendering separates fat, removes water, and kills bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other organisms. However, the high temperatures used (270°F/130°C) can alter or destroy natural enzymes and proteins found in the raw ingredients. http://www.bornfreeusa.org/facts.php?more=1&p=359


DWMeowMix
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
wow. bag of chips. my cat was not on lays cat food and sour cream dip, thank you.

signed,

mildly emotional guy who needs a chill pill a spin class and a hot date
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
wow. bag of chips. my cat was not on lays cat food and sour cream dip, thank you.

signed,

mildly emotional guy who needs a chill pill a spin class and a hot date
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWMeowMix View Post
With all due respect, you might consider doing a little more research on the subject of cat nutrition. In dry foods cereals and protein "meals" are the primary ingredients next to what little dried meat they put into even the most premium cat foods. Grains are indigestable to cats and have next to no biological value. "Meal" consists of mostly the unusable parts of an animal mostly bone and is rendered or boiled down so anything that might have had any biological value to it is destroyed. The only real thing the more so called "premium" dry foods have going for it is that they do not use by-products which consist of but are not in any way limited to: DWMeowMix
No sir, sorry, but I have done plenty of research, and you can do that too. As i said, the food I feed is 100% grain free. There is NO cereal in it either. And it is not made of dry meat. The first ingredient is Deboned Chicken, not meal. It is also low temperature cooked, preserving most of its nutritious value. There is no by-products either.
There is a lot in this site that you can research. I am not talking about premium supermarket foods here. I am talking about high quality grain free foods.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
No sir, sorry, but I have done plenty of research, and you can do that too. As i said, the food I feed is 100% grain free. There is NO cereal in it either. And it is not made of dry meat. The first ingredient is Deboned Chicken, not meal. It is also low temperature cooked, preserving most of its nutritious value. There is no by-products either.
There is a lot in this site that you can research. I am not talking about premium supermarket foods here. I am talking about high quality grain free foods.
Well, you obviously didn't read the rest of my post. We could go round and round on this subject and never agree. So, let's just agree to disagree. I really do hope that you'll do that research. What you'll learn WILL surprise you.

Purrs, DWMeowMix
post #13 of 18
This is why I rarely ever get into discussions about nutrition. People tend to get really hostile.

DWMeowMix
post #14 of 18
Sorry if I sound hostile, but truly, I am stating the facts... I have no idea for how long you have been researching this matter, as you have very little history on this site, but this is really besides the point.
Believe me, I have done the research... A LOT of it... I have spent many months and many many hours a day doing research. I did read all your post, but you should not generalize the ingredients on dry/wet food. I repeat once again... All the stuff you posted about dry food... none applies to the food I feed, so that is that.
I do feed a very high end food that is not found in regular stores. I agree with you on the premium foods, but I assure you that it is not all that is available in the market.
The same applies to wet food - the difference is in the water content. Wet food is about 70% water, and dry is about 10%. The wet food is recommended as cats in general are not good water drinkers, and because of that, they are susceptible to UTIs and Kidney diseases. Again, it does not apply to my cats, as they are very good drinkers....
Nothing really can be generalized, and in the end certain foods will work for some cats, and not for others. There are some for example, that will not thrive on grain free food, and will do better with some quality grains. Again, not the norm, but it does happen.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWMeowMix View Post
Well, you obviously didn't read the rest of my post. We could go round and round on this subject and never agree. So, let's just agree to disagree. I really do hope that you'll do that research. What you'll learn WILL surprise you.

Purrs, DWMeowMix
Many on here have done the research ... and many will actually answer the question asked... Feline nutrition like human is in it infancy thus IMHO the opinions fly and some opinions magically become facts for some... Truly, I can tell you have not done the research you claim too as you would have known about the vast array of grain frees and Actually given the op some help.

to the OP
wet is closer by % ages to a natural cat diet .. no diet is perfect for every cat ... My very nutritionally minded vet stated feed friskies with a no grain if trying to save money
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
Many on here have done the research ... and many will actually answer the question asked... Feline nutrition like human is in it infancy thus IMHO the opinions fly and some opinions magically become facts for some... Truly, I can tell you have not done the research you claim too as you would have known about the vast array of grain frees and Actually given the op some help.

to the OP
wet is closer by % ages to a natural cat diet .. no diet is perfect for every cat ... My very nutritionally minded vet stated feed friskies with a no grain if trying to save money
Well, you'd be wrong about that. I'm aware of the grain free's. It doesn't change the fact that it's still garbage. I'm done here.

DWMeowMix
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by EkEkEkEk07 View Post
my cat that passed was on innova dry adult cat food.

the cat i'm thinking of adopting is on wet food and has a bowl of dry at all times. it's nine lives or fancy feast. she receives wet food twice a day. i prefer to go with premium foods. i might try something other than innova.

is it wrong to even attempt to change a cat's diet to all dry, or to offer wet food only in the morning? how much would i be spending a month on wet food if i went for a premium brand like innova? is two times a day too much?
Ok - back to your post
Twice a day is not too much wet food, but because of the high caloric content on the dry food, just keep an eye on how much they eat... As Sharky said, to save some money, you can get a very good quality dry food for the nutritious content, and some lower quality wet food to go along for the water content... You can certainly give wet only in the morning, no problem...
If they are eating wet, I would keep them in it once a day...
I would also invest in a water fountain - it's really a great investment... With the filters you are assuring they always have clean, fresh water, which they love it.
Good Luck to you, and listen closely to Sharky - she is the food goddess in the site
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by EkEkEkEk07 View Post
my cat that passed was on innova dry adult cat food.

the cat I'm thinking of adopting is on wet food and has a bowl of dry at all times. it's nine lives or fancy feast. she receives wet food twice a day. i prefer to go with premium foods. i might try something other than innova.

is it wrong to even attempt to change a cat's diet to all dry, or to offer wet food only in the morning? how much would i be spending a month on wet food if i went for a premium brand like innova? is two times a day too much?

It is probably a good idea to leave the new cat on the exact food and feeding schedule for some time. Let him or her get settled and comfortable before you switch anything.

As suggested, a slow change in dry by mixing small amount on new into old and gradually increasing.

If he/she really likes wet food and is healthy you may want to keep it that way and change brands later if you like. Or, as we all know, if THEY like.

Two times a day is not too much. It's the total amount that counts.
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