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On average when do males start spraying?  

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Kizzy hasn't been fixed yet, and he's approaching 7mos.

I want to get him neutered before he starts spraying, but I also want to make sure he's completely healthy before I put him in for surgery. At his last vet appt. he finally got his shots... he's due for boosters next week and I could get him fixed then too BUT..... he's been sneezing alot up untill this week, started the day after he had his shots and just slowing down now... he'll sneeze maybe 4 times a day now, instead of 20+.

I'm going to take him in for the boosters, unless they think there's something wrong... but this is going to put of neutering him.

So I'm concerned about how late its getting to neuter him, whether he's going to start spraying soon.

On average, when do male cats start spraying?

Thx.
post #2 of 19
I think he is definitely old enough. It's up to you what you consider safe for him, and you have to make the decision of which risk to take- the one of him starting to spray or risk of complications after surgery...
post #3 of 19
Males can start spraying any time after 4 months.
post #4 of 19
of course you should trust your gut instinct, but unless hes really sick you should have him fixed now.

Holly was still a little sneezy when i took her in, and she came out better than ever. are you taking him to a clinic or vet? either way they usually exam them carefully before any surgery.
post #5 of 19
You should get him neutered ASAP. It's a simple surgery for males. Much less invasive than in females. The odds are better if a male cat gets neutered before he starts that he will never spray than if he starts spraying and gets neutered that he will stop.

Get him neutered immediately.
post #6 of 19
Anytime from 4 months - it depends on the cat though. My last boy Bart started spraying at 8 months old so I got him fixed and it stopped, some you aren't so lucky and they continue to spray.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
I think he is definitely old enough. It's up to you what you consider safe for him, and you have to make the decision of which risk to take- the one of him starting to spray or risk of complications after surgery...
I'd rather the spraying than potential complications after neutering. At least spraying is not a health issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
Males can start spraying any time after 4 months.
Thank you...that's what I needed to know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meowers View Post
of course you should trust your gut instinct, but unless hes really sick you should have him fixed now.

Holly was still a little sneezy when i took her in, and she came out better than ever. are you taking him to a clinic or vet? either way they usually exam them carefully before any surgery.
I take him to my vet. I'm not willing to chance the anesthetic if he is not feeling well, which he hasn't been since we got his shots. Definately going with my gut instinct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hesster View Post
You should get him neutered ASAP. It's a simple surgery for males. Much less invasive than in females. The odds are better if a male cat gets neutered before he starts that he will never spray than if he starts spraying and gets neutered that he will stop.

Get him neutered immediately.
Why should I get him neutered immediately?

I am not willing to risk his health to have him neutered. I'm fully aware of what the operation entails, although its not as invasive as with females it is still a surgery, and quite frankly I would rather he spray than have him develop another URI or more ringworm sores due to stress.


Thanks for those who answered my question about when they can start spraying, I know it is variable, but I was just trying to get a feel for the average.

He's definately going to be neutered, but I would prefer holding off till his health is as close to 100% as I can get it.
post #8 of 19
Okay, my two cents on the subject of spraying. I think everyone will agree with me when I say there is NO law that says a male cat HAS to spray. At any age. Ever. The fact is, they don't necessarily have to start spraying just because they are male and have reached a certain age. If and when they do, quite often spraying can be linked to certain circumstances and when it comes to these circumstances we are not helpless, we can change things. We can also work with a stressed, unhappy cat.

I think we all know that cats can spray for several reasons . Some of these (reasons) are totally preventable. Others can be dealt with depending on what's going on.

My experience. All my male cats were neutered when they were mature adults. (I didn't have them when they were babies.) Anyway, not one ever sprayed. On the other hand, one of my female cats (who was spayed right on schedule at 6 months), sprayed a few times because she was afraid of another cat when he was a brand new addition to the family. (This was a situation that was very easy to fix and they lived together without any problems for the rest of their lives.)

This is an excellent summary of why cats spray:
http://www.celiahaddon.co.uk/pet%20p.../stressed.html

More excellent info in these two books:
Twisted Whiskers by Pam Johnson Bennett
Think Like a Cat by Pam Johnson Bennett
post #9 of 19
I'd primarily be concerned about spraying if the weather warms up. We'll soon be approaching "kitten season" and if he catches the scent of a female in heat, or another male comes around and marks where your boy can smell it, then you will most likely have problems. Some males never spray, but they can start at any time. I know you don't want to have him neutered while he's still sniffling, but I would (just my opinion). It's just such a fast, simple procedure and mine have all acted as though nothing even happened afterward.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post
Okay, my two cents on the subject of spraying. I think everyone will agree with me when I say there is NO law that says a male cat HAS to spray. At any age. Ever. The fact is, they don't necessarily have to start spraying just because they are male and have reached a certain age. If and when they do, quite often spraying can be linked to certain circumstances and when it comes to these circumstances we are not helpless, we can change things. We can also work with a stressed, unhappy cat.

I think we all know that cats can spray for several reasons . Some of these (reasons) are totally preventable. Others can be dealt with depending on what's going on.

My experience. All my male cats were neutered when they were mature adults. (I didn't have them when they were babies.) Anyway, not one ever sprayed. On the other hand, one of my female cats (who was spayed right on schedule at 6 months), sprayed a few times because she was afraid of another cat when he was a brand new addition to the family. (This was a situation that was very easy to fix and they lived together without any problems for the rest of their lives.)

This is an excellent summary of why cats spray:
http://www.celiahaddon.co.uk/pet%20p.../stressed.html

More excellent info in these two books:
Twisted Whiskers by Pam Johnson Bennett
Think Like a Cat by Pam Johnson Bennett
Violet - that link is great - thanks!
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet View Post

This is an excellent summary of why cats spray:
http://www.celiahaddon.co.uk/pet%20p.../stressed.html
Great link, thx so much for posting that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteforest View Post
I know you don't want to have him neutered while he's still sniffling, but I would (just my opinion). It's just such a fast, simple procedure and mine have all acted as though nothing even happened afterward.
Thx for your opinion

I know it it a simple procedure, but as with any surgery there are risks with the anesthetic. After battling a URI, and ringworm (which can pop up under stress, and I'm not 100% sure he's cured...that I will know once a repeat fungal culture is done next week) and potentially having another URI, I don't want to chance the surgery. It's not so much the surgery itself as the stress that comes with going to the vet, and having the surgery. RW is a pain in the and I don't want to deal with it again.

Thx again for all the replies.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteforest View Post
I'd primarily be concerned about spraying if the weather warms up. We'll soon be approaching "kitten season" and if he catches the scent of a female in heat, or another male comes around and marks where your boy can smell it, then you will most likely have problems.
Exactly what I was thinking, and once he starts it's 50/50 on whether he will stop after neutering.

I'm sure your vet will tell you if he's not fit to be operated on.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snake_Lady View Post
Why should I get him neutered immediately?

I am not willing to risk his health to have him neutered. I'm fully aware of what the operation entails, although its not as invasive as with females it is still a surgery, and quite frankly I would rather he spray than have him develop another URI or more ringworm sores due to stress.


Thanks for those who answered my question about when they can start spraying, I know it is variable, but I was just trying to get a feel for the average.

He's definately going to be neutered, but I would prefer holding off till his health is as close to 100% as I can get it.
I doubt it will be stressful for him unless you make it stressful. It's a quick, simple surgery and all of the cats that I've had spayed or neutered have acted like nothing happened by the next day afterward.

I suppose if you want to take the chance that he will start spraying it's your choice, but I personally would not wait.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hesster View Post
I doubt it will be stressful for him unless you make it stressful. It's a quick, simple surgery and all of the cats that I've had spayed or neutered have acted like nothing happened by the next day afterward.

I suppose if you want to take the chance that he will start spraying it's your choice, but I personally would not wait.
How can it not be stressfull?

If I was shoved into a carrier, placed in a car (which I don't like), dropped off in a strange environment, and undergo an operation.... I would be really stressed out.

Nothing I can do can make it less stressful that I know of. My vet will not come to my house to perform a neuter. How on earth can you make a vet visit for an operation stressfree? I would be really curious to know that, as it may save alot of people whose cats get stressed by being crated and taken to the vet. Thanks in advance for any tips you may be able to give.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snake_Lady View Post
How can it not be stressfull?

If I was shoved into a carrier, placed in a car (which I don't like), dropped off in a strange environment, and undergo an operation.... I would be really stressed out.

Nothing I can do can make it less stressful that I know of. My vet will not come to my house to perform a neuter. How on earth can you make a vet visit for an operation stressfree? I would be really curious to know that, as it may save alot of people whose cats get stressed by being crated and taken to the vet. Thanks in advance for any tips you may be able to give.
hmmmm, sounds like Mommy is stressed more than Kizzy. Maybe Kizzy is picking up on your stress, as you know cats are very sensitive.

I doubt that you would really "shove" him into the carrier.

I leave my carriers out all the time, with bedding - and the cats love sleeping in them - so if they have to travel, the carrier has the right smell, and they don't think of it as a strange place.

For the car trip, perhaps a blanket over the carrier would help Kizzy feel better.

The vets that I've had experience with are extremely caring, loving, and gentle towards my pets.

No one here will be able to push you into doing something that you have a "gut" feeling against. They're just trying to help.

I encourage you to try and be calm so Kizzy won't get stressed. Breathe.
post #16 of 19
I don't find car trips or vet visits too stressfull for my babies but they are used to cars since they go to cat shows. I agree that your vet will tell you if he's not up to scratch for desexing yet. My boy Bart was neutered in December and he was wrestling with his sister,Fluffy,within minutes of coming home.
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GloriaJH View Post
hmmmm, sounds like Mommy is stressed more than Kizzy. Maybe Kizzy is picking up on your stress, as you know cats are very sensitive.

I doubt that you would really "shove" him into the carrier.

I leave my carriers out all the time, with bedding - and the cats love sleeping in them - so if they have to travel, the carrier has the right smell, and they don't think of it as a strange place.

For the car trip, perhaps a blanket over the carrier would help Kizzy feel better.

The vets that I've had experience with are extremely caring, loving, and gentle towards my pets.

No one here will be able to push you into doing something that you have a "gut" feeling against. They're just trying to help.

I encourage you to try and be calm so Kizzy won't get stressed. Breathe.

Umm, I am quite calm thanks I'm not worried at all about him being neutered or any other procedure nessecary. I was responding to " I doubt it will be stressful for him unless you make it stressful." and very curious as to how I could make it less stressful for him.

My cat is does not like car rides at all, blanket or no blanket. And of course I wouldn't just shove him in his carrier. Which btw is out all the time, with a nice lil blankie in it, and he hates it.

So I'm still waiting on the OP to tell me how I could make it less stressful for him?

I'm also curious as to why certain folks are so adamant that I should get him neutered now? I mean, is there health risks or what? I didn't think there was with a male?

I've respected other people's opinions, and listened to them... I did not ask if I should neuter him now. I asked when males start spraying.... and now that I got the answer (could be anytime), I'm choosing to wait and have him neutered when I know for sure his ringworm has gone away (have any of the posters telling me I should do it now even though my cat may be sick, ever battled ringworm? It is stress related for the most part. Stress can cause his immune system to lower and the ringworm to become active again. Which quite frankly I do not want to deal with) and I know he's healthy. Anesthetic is anesthetic. Not to mention healing. It being a minor surgery is really irrelevant in this case. Anesthetic should not be administered to a cat who may be sick. That is coming from my vet.

He is an only cat, and a strictly indoors cat.... so I'm still baffled as to why certain posters are insisting that I should get him fixed now? Especially the posters that disregard the ringworm, and possible URI.

I'm well aware that my vet will not operate if he is the least bit sick (which is why we didn't neuter at 6mos, his ringworm was still there).

Ultimately I would like to have him done within the next 2mos, prior to kitty season. Once the windows are open, he could very well pick up on other scents and start spraying. I'm hoping he is healthy enough prior to him starting to spray.
post #18 of 19
Sorry that I may have offended you. I tried to put in smilies, and show the concern I feel for you. Sometimes, no matter how one tries to be a word-smither expressing something, the thoughts may come across differently to the receiver.

Sounds like you did get the answer to your original question about spraying.

It's difficult for a "stranger" to be able to address another's specific situation. For me, when I ask for help, I just understand the good place that they are coming from, and glean what help I can from the post.

The post that you quoted from me was just trying to say that I was concerned about you - and - now that you have said that you are okay, I'll just leave this thread. I wasn't trying to impose solutions on you, just offering ideas, and, I understand from your post that you already know, and have tried the solutions that I was offering. Sorry I could not have been more helpful.

Best to you, and Kizzy.

Peace,
Gloria
post #19 of 19
Why don't you schedule the appointment for next week since he is already going to have to get in the car and make the trip to the vet, which seems to be what you're worried about in regard to the stress. If the vet feels he should wait, reschedule. If the vet thinks he's fine then it's taken care of and one less trip to the vet you have to make and you don't have to worry about him starting to spray.
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