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Is anyone else tired of hearing about Obama and the Inauguration? - Page 8

post #211 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post
But, now that you mention it, I think you have chosen a hateful interpretation where that was not the intention. He is merely praying for the day when color won't matter.
Yep, there's a whole lotta hateful interpretation going on in this board IMO!!
post #212 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by neetanddave View Post
My point would be the words aren't his own, they are from a song that was written as a counter to the National Anthem. Easily recognizable words to the black community, yet another stick in the eye for everyone else, IMO.
Why would quoting from the Black National Anthem be considered a "stick in in eye"? I found the full text of it online and find nothing offensive in it. It was obviously authored at a time when blacks were far more oppressed than they are today but I don't see any relevance to that. The words are of the power of faith and hope in enduring adversity. There is no hatred in them that I could detect.

Quote:
More than once there's been controversy over its substitution at special events, as its been seen as devisive by many.
Why???
post #213 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by PookieBoy View Post
Yep, there's a whole lotta hateful interpretation going on in this board IMO!!
You can say that again.
post #214 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
You can say that again.
Good on you for acknowledging the error of your ways!

(He was agreeing with my analysis of *your* comment! )
post #215 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by PookieBoy View Post
I mean, I'm caucasion but I'm not "white" per se, I'm actually kinda beige.
I'm really rather pinkish with tannish-reddish blotches (freckles).

My friend's brother wouldn't vote for Obama because he has African blood in him. My friend is married to a man who is of German/Japanese descent. Her brother gets along marvelously with her husband. She asked her brother why he had a problem with a man who was half caucasion in one case and not the other. He didn't have an answer. Racism doesn't have a good answer.

Yes, I suspect that there were far more people that wouldn't vote for him because he was part black, than those that voted for him because of it. We'll never know.
post #216 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post
Good on you for acknowledging the error of your ways!

(He was agreeing with my analysis of *your* comment! )
Ya think? Gee whiz, thank you for that clarification, I never would have known.
post #217 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
Ya think? Gee whiz, thank you for that clarification, I never would have known.
So you really are agreeing that your intrepation was hateful??

I actually am impressed. Congratulations.
post #218 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post
So you really are agreeing that your intrepation was hateful??

I actually am impressed. Congratulations.

Oh, of course, I am a totally hateful person, didn't you know? Congratulations to you for the name calling.
post #219 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
Oh, of course, I am a totally hateful person, didn't you know? Congratulations to you for the name calling.
What name did I call you???

PS - I'm not impressed anymore.
post #220 of 239
moat moat moat moat moat moat
post #221 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post
The nitpicking in this thread is driving me nuts.
I'm done nitpicking Misery loves company, and I was just in here yesterday being company to the miserable With everyone else enjoying their parties, they had no one else to be miserable with.
post #222 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschauer View Post
What name did I call you???

PS - I'm not impressed anymore.
It's okay, we can disagree without calling each other names like "hateful".
No worries. You don't have to be impressed either, it is okay, really.

It is the dawn of a new day. While I did not like that little ditty by the Rev, I am trying to give Barack a chance, I do want him to succeed.
post #223 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
It's okay, we can disagree without calling each other names like "hateful".
No worries. You don't have to be impressed either, it is okay, really.

It is the dawn of a new day. While I did not like that little ditty by the Rev, I am trying to give Barack a chance, I do want him to succeed.
OK. Truce.

But, I didn't call you hateful. I said your interpretation was hateful.
post #224 of 239
A truce is good.

But I don't think my interpretation was hateful, just my opinion.

I would much rather we all just took any color out of the mix.
post #225 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippymjp View Post
I'm done nitpicking Misery loves company, and I was just in here yesterday being company to the miserable With everyone else enjoying their parties, they had no one else to be miserable with.
Who's miserable? My opinions have been consistent all along re: BHO. I'd LOVE to be wrong, for America's sake I hope I am.
post #226 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by neetanddave View Post
Who's miserable? My opinions have been consistent all along re: BHO. I'd LOVE to be wrong, for America's sake I hope I am.
Alrighty then Whatever gets you through the day
post #227 of 239
When I was a child, there was a Sunday-school song: "red and yellow, black and white, all are precious in His sight." I suppose it's not politically correct to teach that to children any more. But you know what, different skin colors are always going to be with us. It's just the way it is. It's impossible to ignore unless you're blind. So I think we're never going to get beyond discrimination and beyond racism until we stop equating skin color with being different, and being different in the sense of being lesser than another color -- we're not going to get beyond racism untill we stop putting people into groups on the basis of their skin color. ALL skin colors are beautiful. We need to get to the point of being able to acknowledge different skin colors and appreciate them for what they are, not as a way of setting us apart, or worse, as a way of making one color feel superior to another. We need to be able to refer to a person's skin color without feeling like we're being racist. When will we ever reach that point? I'd like to see those children be able to sing that song again, and not have those skin colors thought of in racist terms but to appreciate the song for what it really says: every skin color is beautiful in the eyes of God. After all, He made them that color.

Hopefully with the election of this new "black" (well, chocolate, actually -- are maybe even mocha to be more precise ) President, we're one step farther along toward that goal.
post #228 of 239
I don't think enough people are appreciating what our country, who we the people represent, and who we have elected as our new president, truly means. We the people of the United States of America are ready for a change, we need a change, we want change, change is our only hope! This is about so much more then color, social class, and political partisan. It's about so much more then what some people are only reading at face value, Barack Obama's words himself, "change". Every doubt that anyone has in him is equally opposed with another hope and belief.
I don't know how one could complain about such a historical event that you are part of, especially when with today's technology, you can change the channel if you choose to be so naive.
post #229 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
When I was a child, there was a Sunday-school song: "red and yellow, black and white, all are precious in His sight." I suppose it's not politically correct to teach that to children any more. But you know what, different skin colors are always going to be with us. It's just the way it is. It's impossible to ignore unless you're blind. So I think we're never going to get beyond discrimination and beyond racism until we stop equating skin color with being different, and being different in the sense of being lesser than another color -- we're not going to get beyond racism untill we stop putting people into groups on the basis of their skin color. ALL skin colors are beautiful. We need to get to the point of being able to acknowledge different skin colors and appreciate them for what they are, not as a way of setting us apart, or worse, as a way of making one color feel superior to another. We need to be able to refer to a person's skin color without feeling like we're being racist. When will we ever reach that point? I'd like to see those children be able to sing that song again, and not have those skin colors thought of in racist terms but to appreciate the song for what it really says: every skin color is beautiful in the eyes of God. After all, He made them that color.

Hopefully with the election of this new "black" (well, chocolate, actually -- are maybe even mocha to be more precise ) President, we're one step farther along toward that goal.

Very wise, and a wonderful sentiment.

But you know, it's already been done. And what makes it sadly strange is the people that have gotten past racism are outcasts themselves. You will not see an actual, practicing racist Wicca...ever. And most likely, none of the other earth or nature faiths either, but that's the only one I'm sure of. The reason being is, part of being what they are is to subject themselves to a good, honest, thorough introspection. Anyone that can honestly and objectively look into themselves will not be a racist.

Introspection is scary, I know, I've done it. I believe that one of the main reasons a racist can be a racist and deny it so completely is that many of them have never, ever truly looked at themselves. They can be obviously racist and totally deny it, because they are convinced themselves they are not.
post #230 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippymjp View Post
Very wise, and a wonderful sentiment.

But you know, it's already been done. And what makes it sadly strange is the people that have gotten past racism are outcasts themselves. You will not see an actual, practicing racist Wicca...ever. And most likely, none of the other earth or nature faiths either, but that's the only one I'm sure of. The reason being is, part of being what they are is to subject themselves to a good, honest, thorough introspection. Anyone that can honestly and objectively look into themselves will not be a racist.

Introspection is scary, I know, I've done it. I believe that one of the main reasons a racist can be a racist and deny it so completely is that many of them have never, ever truly looked at themselves. They can be obviously racist and totally deny it, because they are convinced themselves they are not.
It's not about race, although some may feel the need to feel so.
post #231 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheylink View Post
It's not about race, although some may feel the need to feel so.
What part are you referring to?
post #232 of 239
I think this entire election is and isn't about race.

I think it's a sign of our country changing, our country accepting diversity, and our country thinking beyond the color of a person's skin.

At the same time, however, it's about hope for those who were oppressed during the Cival Rights Movement, it's about progression, and it IS about the color of a person's skin.

My hope for this nation is that Obama can be a role model for young black and African American children (as well as other races) across this nation; that these young children can grow up and stop saying, "I could never be President." He's proof that they CAN.

I hope the hip-hop, gangster culture stops being the #1 role model for young black men, and that Obama becomes that.

Did I vote for him? No. Was it because he's black? No. But I hope that he's able to set examples of how the black culture should change. I would love to see Gary, IN, New Orleans, Detroit, and other major urban areas change because Obama, a black man, is our new President.

While I may not support his political views, I support him as President. I wish the best for him, because I wish the best for our nation.
post #233 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheylink View Post
It's not about race, although some may feel the need to feel so.
That is the exactly reason that everybody I know that didn't vote for him didn't.
post #234 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky View Post
I think this entire election is and isn't about race.

I think it's a sign of our country changing, our country accepting diversity, and our country thinking beyond the color of a person's skin.

At the same time, however, it's about hope for those who were oppressed during the Cival Rights Movement, it's about progression, and it IS about the color of a person's skin.

My hope for this nation is that Obama can be a role model for young black and African American children (as well as other races) across this nation; that these young children can grow up and stop saying, "I could never be President." He's proof that they CAN.

I hope the hip-hop, gangster culture stops being the #1 role model for young black men, and that Obama becomes that.

Did I vote for him? No. Was it because he's black? No. But I hope that he's able to set examples of how the black culture should change. I would love to see Gary, IN, New Orleans, Detroit, and other major urban areas change because Obama, a black man, is our new President.

While I may not support his political views, I support him as President. I wish the best for him, because I wish the best for our nation.
Great Post, that about sums it up for me.
post #235 of 239
For all those who say that it isn't about race, perhaps you should let the media know that. That's ALL I heard about all darn day - how he was the first African-American President (which is also a pet peeve of mine - not all black people are from Africa, and while Obama can directly trace his African heritage many can't...so why are they all referred to as "African-Americans"?).

I totally agree with Tim, and frankly that's exactly what MLK said too. "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character."

We all need to look beyond the color of his skin, and that means that any time there is a critical opinion of him that it's not necessarily racist. That means that he should not be held to any higher or lower standard than any other President because of the color of his skin. And that means that the left needs to stop putting race at the forefront of their rhetoric when discussing Obama or when giving speeches about him.

Obama should be judged by the content of his character and the decisions and policies he makes while in office. He can't be the "greatest President ever" on inauguration day. He hadn't done anything besides get elected.
post #236 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb View Post
Obama should be judged by the content of his character and the decisions and policies he makes while in office. He can't be the "greatest President ever" on inauguration day. He hadn't done anything besides get elected.
He will be, oh, will he ever. Like any President. The 100-day "honeymoon" is fiction. Every President jumps right into the fire and gets tested from day one, and President Obama is no exception as he's already catching flack on his executive order to close down Gitmo. Criminy -- something so many people agree has to be done -- their main point of disagreement is HOW and WHEN, not if -- and the politicos, lobbyists, special interests, lawyers, extremes of both parties, and other Washington low-lifes can't even give him that little bit.
post #237 of 239
post #238 of 239
Here's an interesting article from David Frum titled "How the GOP Can Rise Again", in this weeks Newsweek:

http://www.newsweek.com/id/180043

Here's another opinion piece by a republican from today's LATimes:

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...,3344794.story

The author is talking about how Reagan wouldn't recognize today's GOP.
post #239 of 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by PookieBoy View Post
The author is talking about how Reagan wouldn't recognize today's GOP.
No kidding. I don't recognize it. Did it start going off track with Newt Gringrich, or did it happen before that? Maybe Bush #41's unreadable lips? These things happen so insidiously you're not aware of them until in retrospect.

Bill S. has done any number of insightful op-eds on the Republican Party's problems; occasionally I transcribe some of them; one on the subject is here: http://www.billsebastianforum.com/vi...php?f=66&t=195

Mods: if the link isn't permitted, that's fine, please remove; Y'all know where to go to look for it.
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