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Really bad mats on the belly

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I recently took in a beautiful Himalayan that was in an abusive situation. In addition to fleas, he had really bad tangled mats all over, but especially on his belly. I removed the ones on his back and sides but planned to take him to a groomer when I got the money (next week) to remove the ones on his belly. Several were so big and tight to his skin that seemed the only way to go. Yesterday I picked him up and they were gone!! All of them. I find it impossible to believe that the cat could have removed them all, but what else is the answer? I should mention that the cats front paws are declawed (I know, I know...). Anyone have any ideas how the cat could have done this? Or, is it possible there is some anonomous benefactor in my neighborhood?
post #2 of 9
Welcome to TCS!

I really doubt the cat could remove the mats himself. So the question comes down to - Who else has access to the cat and could have removed the mats? Also, you are keeping him inside, right? A declawed cat has a major handicap surviving outside.
post #3 of 9
that is very strange. cats can work out some mats, small ones, but not the kind like you describe. i have no idea...
post #4 of 9
Someone else had to have taken pity on him. And as everyone else said, you can't leave a declawed cat outside - it's simply not safe for the cat.

If you keep doing this and that someone who cared enough to remove those awful mats likes the cat enough, he may not come home one day. I, and probably several other members on this forum, wouldn't leave a declawed cat outside - and would probably see those bad mats as a possible sign of neglect. Simply put, someone else likes your kitty. Best to bring him in if you don't want to risk losing him.

You also need to make sure to get a proper detangling comb for his fur type and comb him daily to help prevent anymore mats.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Point very well taken about him going outside. At the beginning I did let him outside some as he was an outdoor kitty in his previous life and I was having major cat acclimation problems with him and the other 3 cats. The majority of the time he seemed quite happy on the washing machine in the laundry room rather than actually going outside. Obviously I was wrong because I have to believe someone got to him. I am being much more careful now about letting him outside and if he goes into the laundry room I close the cat door so he can't get out. This is very creepy and definitely a wake up call about protecting him. Thanks for the feedback!
Diane
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beanoville View Post
Point very well taken about him going outside. At the beginning I did let him outside some as he was an outdoor kitty in his previous life and I was having major cat acclimation problems with him and the other 3 cats. The majority of the time he seemed quite happy on the washing machine in the laundry room rather than actually going outside. Obviously I was wrong because I have to believe someone got to him. I am being much more careful now about letting him outside and if he goes into the laundry room I close the cat door so he can't get out. This is very creepy and definitely a wake up call about protecting him. Thanks for the feedback!
Diane
Just a side note, I found a beautiful tuxedo boy in our yard that was matted terribly and thin. He was very friendly and would come to me, gentle as could be so I can only assume he belonged to someone for him to be so trusting of humans. I took him to a vet and the local no-kill shelter. I figured anyone who let their cat get so skinny and matted as he was didn't deserve to have the cat. He was shaved, spent about 6 months in the shelter and now has a new and loving home where he doesn't go outside.

Now I'm not saying you let him get matted but matts are painful to a cat and someone obviously saw this cat and cut out the matts for you. That's a good thing, but please keep him in now.
post #7 of 9
A stranger cutting off a strange cat's mats is possible, but I think unlikely. And if someone had done that, the belly hair would look short and obviously scissor-cut.

My guess is that the cat just had a good long grooming session, and succeeded in chewing the mats out, perhaps with the help of shedding.
post #8 of 9
Agree with the rest. Declawed cats especially need to be inside or supervised outside (harness/leash or cat enclosure). You were very lucky this time around. Maybe not the next time!
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmylou View Post
A stranger cutting off a strange cat's mats is possible, but I think unlikely. And if someone had done that, the belly hair would look short and obviously scissor-cut.
I've done it before. And the evened up the fur as much as I could and trimmed a little to help prevent it from matting anytime soon. Her mats were so bad she had trouble walking. It was a cat that belonged to some people that used to live in a small trailer park near where I lived. They fed their cats and gave them water, but that was about it.
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