TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › Oh, man. Was the salad contaminated?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Oh, man. Was the salad contaminated?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I made a lovely dinner last night. Pasta e Fagioli, garlic bread and a lovely green salad. Except - within 4 hours of eating that dinner, my boyfriend got violently ill. I mean, vomiting and diarrhea. I had a tiny tummy ache, but nothing bad.

He's fine this morning. So, I suspect the bagged greens. And they are going right into the garbage! I don't even want to try to salvage them (ie: rinsing them a couple times.)

Thank goodness my mom didn't have any - at 84 and frail - not a good thing to have happen. Or maybe I will call the county health dept and ask if I should take some action re: possible contamination.

I know there have been problems with bagged greens in the past, but I have never had an issue with them - until now.
post #2 of 29
Oh no, how scary Is he better today?
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bella713 View Post
Oh no, how scary Is he better today?
He's fine this morning. Had a bagel and coffee for breakfast. I also reported the incident to the state health dept.
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AddieBee View Post
He's fine this morning. Had a bagel and coffee for breakfast. I also reported the incident to the state health dept.
That was a good idea, with all the issues with vegetables the past couple of years it is better to be safe then sorry...
post #5 of 29
My in-laws do something that absolutely drives me nuts - they'll use those prebagged salads right out of the bag and never wash the greens first! Possible bacteria contamination aside, can you imagine how much pesticide residue could be leftover?

If the dressing was a new bottle you may want to consider that suspect, too. Will they be taking the leftover salad mix?
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
My in-laws do something that absolutely drives me nuts - they'll use those prebagged salads right out of the bag and never wash the greens first! Possible bacteria contamination aside, can you imagine how much pesticide residue could be leftover?

If the dressing was a new bottle you may want to consider that suspect, too. Will they be taking the leftover salad mix?
Mea culpa! I am also bad about that. And I have now learned my lesson. I've been w/ Doug almost 5 years and I have never known him to barf. He has had suspected food poisoning once before since we have been together. After eating at a local restaurant, he got sick - just from the back end. Again, I was fine. We think it was the cole slaw he ate - mayonnaise, you know.

The State Health Dept. and now County Health have taken statements, but so far, no one wants the potentially offending bagged greens.
post #7 of 29
Toss 'em or wash 'em. Or depending on the type of greens, cook them.

The usual reason salmonella and e. coli get on veggies to begin with is either how they're fertilized (depends on the country they're from) or from workers going in the fields..

I think we're actually very spoiled by how much of our veggies we can usually safely eat raw. In some countries they have to cook most of them first to kill bacteria.
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
Toss 'em or wash 'em. Or depending on the type of greens, cook them.

The usual reason salmonella and e. coli get on veggies to begin with is either how they're fertilized (depends on the country they're from) or from workers going in the fields..
I think we're actually very spoiled by how much of our veggies we can usually safely eat raw. In some countries they have to cook most of them first to kill bacteria.
Uuuuhhhh... do you mean what I THINK you mean? As in, no time for a potty break? Or their hands are dirty... I mean, that kind of makes sense.
post #9 of 29
They poo in the fields...sigh.
post #10 of 29
Hubby and I have one of those salad spinners - very nice. Every day for lunch we take spinach salads and also carrots and celery. We wash all of it after taking it out of the box or bag. We get the large container of spinach in the boxes made from corn plastic and we (read I) wash it on Sunday and put it in a large rubbermaid container and we do the same with all the other produce even if it says it has already been washed. We don't want to take any chances.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AddieBee View Post
Uuuuhhhh... do you mean what I THINK you mean? As in, no time for a potty break? Or their hands are dirty... I mean, that kind of makes sense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatMom2Wires View Post
They poo in the fields...sigh.

Pretty disgusting, isn't it?

There is a salmonella outbreak occurring right now. I posted a link about it to inform peeps several days ago. Let me find it and I'll post it for you.
post #12 of 29
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AddieBee View Post
I made a lovely dinner last night. Pasta e Fagioli, garlic bread and a lovely green salad. Except - within 4 hours of eating that dinner, my boyfriend got violently ill. I mean, vomiting and diarrhea. I had a tiny tummy ache, but nothing bad.

He's fine this morning. So, I suspect the bagged greens. And they are going right into the garbage! I don't even want to try to salvage them (ie: rinsing them a couple times.)

Thank goodness my mom didn't have any - at 84 and frail - not a good thing to have happen. Or maybe I will call the county health dept and ask if I should take some action re: possible contamination.

I know there have been problems with bagged greens in the past, but I have never had an issue with them - until now.
Aww i'm sorry to hear that, i've had food poisoning a couple of times from takeout and i know it's horrid.

You should try growing your own lettuce and tomatoes. Even a tiny backyard can hold them. if you have more room you could have cucumber and other things as well. At least that way you have a supply for months and you KNOW what been on them.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragoriana View Post
Aww i'm sorry to hear that, i've had food poisoning a couple of times from takeout and i know it's horrid.

You should try growing your own lettuce and tomatoes. Even a tiny backyard can hold them. if you have more room you could have cucumber and other things as well. At least that way you have a supply for months and you KNOW what been on them.
Yep, I have a teeny weeny garden - 1m by 1m - and so far I have growing are corn, tomatoes, broccoli and cucumbers. I did have lettuce but the birds ate them.

It gives a person great satisfaction seeing your own veggies grow, and you know what has been near it I have about 10 tomatoes in the early stages and the broccoli have beautiful new florets growing as well as 2 new cucumbers. The corn has husks so I am not sure what is happening with it
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
I would have to do porch planters. My mom would never let me tear up the lawn in the back for a garden. And for some reason, lettuce didn't grow well when my dad tried many, many years ago. In the summertime, I get fieldgrown lettuce from the farmers market here... and I do WASH it!!!

I do grow basil in the summer - easy-peasy-can't-kill-it-for-trying... and good for cooking and tomato-basil-mozarella salad.

One year, my boyfriend tried growing habanero peppers in a planter outside but the animals got them. We think it was a squirrel(s). Each little pepper had a bucktooth bite mark in it... and we had images of the little critter hopping around saying, "hot, hot, hot!!!" And then trying another!
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AddieBee View Post
I would have to do porch planters. My mom would never let me tear up the lawn in the back for a garden. And for some reason, lettuce didn't grow well when my dad tried many, many years ago. In the summertime, I get fieldgrown lettuce from the farmers market here... and I do WASH it!!!

I do grow basil in the summer - easy-peasy-can't-kill-it-for-trying... and good for cooking and tomato-basil-mozarella salad.

One year, my boyfriend tried growing habanero peppers in a planter outside but the animals got them. We think it was a squirrel(s). Each little pepper had a bucktooth bite mark in it... and we had images of the little critter hopping around saying, "hot, hot, hot!!!" And then trying another!
Hey, you know you don't have to rip into the ground for a garden! There are no dig gardens. You can make them natural with hay bales for walls and layering newspaper, soil, blood n bone etc, or you can build up a simple garden with sleepers and pickets and simply fill it in with fresh soil That way not only do you not have to dig, but it is at a height where you can sit on the wall comfortably to do weeding and picking
post #17 of 29
What brand of greens did you buy?

I buy Earthbound Farm organic pre-washed salad greens in the winter... i don't wash them again. They seem to be a reputable company, I found this about their pre-washed greens:

http://www.ebfarm.com/Products/QualityFoodSafety.aspx

I thought you can't wash off e-coli anyway.

(I'm sorry to hear that your husband got sick.)
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
What brand of greens did you buy?

I buy Earthbound Farm organic pre-washed salad greens in the winter... i don't wash them again. They seem to be a reputable company, I found this about their pre-washed greens:

http://www.ebfarm.com/Products/QualityFoodSafety.aspx

I thought you can't wash off e-coli anyway.

(I'm sorry to hear that your husband got sick.)
I buy the same kind as you. I do wash them. I am just in the habit of doing it. I wash everything. I used to eat a lot of sprouts, until I found out they are widely contaminated. we buy all of our root veggies from a local farmer. He doesn't use and fertilizers, or chemicals. I admittly picked one of his carrots fresh from the feild last fall, and just started eating it. He allows us to pick our own. If we chose too. the kids love it
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
I buy Earthbound Farm organic pre-washed salad greens in the winter... i don't wash them again.
Almost all the bag or containers of salad mixes I've seen say pre-washed. Apparently it's not washed well enough since people still get salmonella and other bacteria from a lot of these.

I'm not sure what it's called, but my in-laws have some little three tier container for growing sprouts. You grow them in water. For those that like sprouts, and want a safer alternative try finding one of these.
I've also see those Aero-garden things and wondered if they're any good. Chances are if you get the proper grow lights you could grow greens indoors in the winter in regular containers..
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragoriana View Post
Hey, you know you don't have to rip into the ground for a garden! There are no dig gardens. You can make them natural with hay bales for walls and layering newspaper, soil, blood n bone etc, or you can build up a simple garden with sleepers and pickets and simply fill it in with fresh soil That way not only do you not have to dig, but it is at a height where you can sit on the wall comfortably to do weeding and picking
Fencing or raised tiered stuff is prohibited in this neighborhood. My mom wanted to put in a raised garden for my dad after he had a stroke. She had to petition the township and the neighborhood voted it down.

I don't have much of a green thumb anyway....
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
What brand of greens did you buy?

I buy Earthbound Farm organic pre-washed salad greens in the winter... i don't wash them again. They seem to be a reputable company, I found this about their pre-washed greens:

http://www.ebfarm.com/Products/QualityFoodSafety.aspx

I thought you can't wash off e-coli anyway.

(I'm sorry to hear that your husband got sick.)
Actually, it was my boyfriend. I have bought Earthbound Farms stuff before.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post

I thought you can't wash off e-coli anyway.
Exactly. That's why I only buy whole heads of lettuce these days (no leaf lettuce -- too exposed to contamination), and I only use the interior of the head, where contamination is much less likely to reach.

And I wash the living daylights out of it, because even though washing doesn't help with E. coli, it can help eliminate other contaminants... including plain ol' dirt.

By the way -- I love salad spinners, and I get the most out of mine by doing a "wash cycle" with it, too: I put the lettuce in the spinner, fill it up with luke-warm water, spin, drain, refill, spin, drain, refill... a final rinse with cold water, and then I spin it dry. We eat lots of salad, and we've never gotten sick from it -- thanks to my obsessive washing!
post #23 of 29
P.S. -- Earthbound Farms is a great company, but even reputable companies are vulnerable: one outbreak a few years ago affected Earthbound products because some of their greens were grown next door to a pig farm, and when it rained, the runoff carried pigpoop into the growing fields. So even a good brand name isn't a guarantee.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
Exactly. That's why I only buy whole heads of lettuce these days (no leaf lettuce -- too exposed to contamination), and I only use the interior of the head, where contamination is much less likely to reach.
Iceburg? Ick. You might as well just drink some water for as much nutrients as iceburg lettuce will give you, the stuff is pretty much empty - that and it taste horrible.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
Iceburg? Ick. You might as well just drink some water for as much nutrients as iceburg lettuce will give you, the stuff is pretty much empty - that and it taste horrible.
The only lettuce I could eat when I was living in Texas was iceberg. Everything else was old and limp and gross by the time it got to Texas. The iceberg was nice and crunchy. The lettuce is just filler anyway, for all the other goodies that go in the salad.
post #26 of 29
DH and I really don't even eat lettuce very often anymore. Spinach is better and has a nice crunch. It's also very nutritious.

I have no problems getting fresh leaf lettuce here, though. In the spring and summer I can usually get homegrown from my dad and his wife - which is about the only time we do eat lettuce.

And that's awful about the neighborhood prohibiting putting in such beds and gardens! If I want to put tacky pink flamingos in my yard it's my business - anyone with the guts to complain would be liable to get one chunked at them and me yelling at them to get off my lawn.
Note: we do not have such silly rules where I live, thankfully. I have turtle pens to build, a fence to extend, and a garden to plan out.
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
I actually love good lettuce - leaf, romaine, etc. And when it is locally field grown, it is wonderful!! Sweet and tender.

I"m also supposed to be dieting and well... salad (lettuce) is a big part of that.
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
The only lettuce I could eat when I was living in Texas was iceberg. Everything else was old and limp and gross by the time it got to Texas. The iceberg was nice and crunchy. The lettuce is just filler anyway, for all the other goodies that go in the salad.

Exactly. I love red and green leaf lettuce, Boston lettuce, romaine... but they're harder to find fresh, they're more expensive, and they're 'way riskier, so I avoid them these days.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AddieBee View Post
Fencing or raised tiered stuff is prohibited in this neighborhood. My mom wanted to put in a raised garden for my dad after he had a stroke. She had to petition the township and the neighborhood voted it down.

I don't have much of a green thumb anyway....

Oh, poop
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Cat Lounge
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › Oh, man. Was the salad contaminated?