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Dying kitten

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I have on of three of my 6or7-week old foster kittens dying as I type. information:

Cannot take to vet(mother insists not)
Has slight upper respiritory illness (sneezing, snotty nose, and slight eye puss)
I have her wrapped in a blanket
Feeding her i syringe of watered down chicken broth every 45 min.
She is now getting up every few minutes to stretch, the lies back down to sleep

The strange thing is that she was the least sick until this afternoon.

Please tell me if I'm doing anything wrong
post #2 of 29
Who are you fostering the kittens for? Can you call someone at a rescue to come and get them? Little kittens go down hill very fast. Ohhhh, I hope someone can help you
post #3 of 29
Not as a substitute to going to a vet, but...

Folks can correct me if I'm wrong, but if he's syringe feeding, wouldn't something like KMR be better than chicken broth? Or soupy wet food?
post #4 of 29
I want you to know that it is nothing you are doing wrong I am sure. This just happens and there is nothing you can do about it, you are wonderful for trying, so be happy you are, no matter the outcome.

First, I would try to rub some karro syrup (corn syrup) on her gums, this may help to give her a little boost.
I am not sure about the brooth, mabey try giving it less often, I am not sure, but every 45 mins seems too soon.
Make sure she is warm, if she isn't warm enough she will not eat and it can be harmful to try and force her to, if she is cold or you have her lying upside down like a baby, it can cause her to assperate and get the fluid in her lungs and that can cause her to get worse.
just try to keep her warm and comfortable, once they get too far gone even vets have a hard time bringing them around.
I would mabey try to give her some KMR or a little water with the karo syrup, instead of broth. But make sure she isn't cold first.
Good luck, I hope it turns out well for kitty and you
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
she is having small convulsions and jerking her head back and rapidly inhaling.

ehhhhhh....


I'm going to see if There is any corn syrup
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
She stopped twitching. I gave her .1 ml corn syrup and she instantly stood up and began licking at it
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyBoo View Post
she is having small convulsions and jerking her head back and rapidly inhaling.

ehhhhhh....


I'm going to see if There is any corn syrup

Awe sweetie, you are trying but there may be nothing you can do for her. try the syrup if you can, but is there any one you can call, like amyscrazy suggested? mabey the rescue can give you some advice or take her to the vets?
I am sorry you have to go through this with her.
post #8 of 29
I would get some Olbas Oil or menthol and put some on a cloth in the room,It will open up his airways and nasal passage and help him to breath.
It is safe for cats to breath in and will work within minutes.

Hope she's going to pull through
post #9 of 29
Thought you might appreciate a link to support that Olbas Oil is safe for cats to breath.

http://www.bluecross.org.uk/web/site...ts/Cat_flu.asp
post #10 of 29
Broth is great for people, I would switch to KMR, the milk would not hurt her, the fluid in her nose makes it hard to suck or breath, the head back could be her way of trying to clear her snotty nose. If you don't want to give her milk at least baby electrolite replacement. I would give her as much liquid as she will take about every hour, and watch her pee out put. The kitten may need a little stimulation to help her pee, so that may be on you to do. Hope all goes well.
post #11 of 29
Hi I hope the poor lil kit is still hanging in there!I am not a vet but here are some recipes I used when I found some kittens after a hurricane(couldn't get to the store) Good luck and I hope the kitten makes it!try calling around to different rescue groups and spca,humane society and such also call as many vets as you can ask advice as well as telling them your situation maybe it will fall on sympathetic ears!!again good luck!

HOMEMADE RECIPE FOR KITTEN FORMULA


3 oz. condensed milk
3 oz. water
4 oz. plain yogurt (NOT low-fat)
3 large or 4 small egg yolks

ANOTHER KITTEN DIET


1/2 cup whole milk
1 egg yolk
1 drop mulitple infant vitamins (Please ask your vet)


Mix well or blend together in a blender for smoothest consistency.


DOSAGE (Divide and feed 4 times daily)
Age (in weeks) ml /per grams of body weight /per day 1 week13 ml2 weeks 17 ml3 weeks * 20 ml (* encourage solid food) 4 weeks 22 ml
Always remember to consult your vet if you are ever unsure of feeding amounts or requirements. Never use these homemade diets for long term use.

KITTEN REHYDRATION FORMULA

This formula can be used for kittens suffering from dehydration and diarrhea. This mixture is thick but drinkable. It is just as effective as glucose-based oral solutions in preventing and treating dehydration and has the added advantage of reducing the volume and duration of diarrhea.


Cereal-based oral rehydration solution can be made by mixing:

1/2 cup dry, precooked infant's rice cereal
2 cups of water
1/4 teaspoon salt.

NOTE: This solution should only be used temporarily. If you think your kitten is suffering dehydration and/or severe diarrhea, do not hesitate to see your vet immediately. Dehydration and persistent diarrhea in young kittens and cats can lead to serious organ failure, fever, shock, malnutrition and other serious health conditions.

At three weeks or so, you can start training the babies to eat food in a dish. Do so by mixing either dry or canned kitten food with the milk formula and mush it until it is a thick liquid. Go ahead and use your blender, and pretend you're making a milkshake. You'll probably need to "prime" the kitty by putting a bit of the mixture on your finger tip, then showing her the saucer. As the kitten learns to eat and enjoy her "mush", you can gradually reduce the amount of milk replacement formula.

Finally, she can graduate to solid kitten food. Many cat owners provide dry food to be eaten at will, supplemented with a small serving of canned food once or twice a day. Canned food remaining in the can should be refrigerated immediately after opening, and the next serving can be warmed in a microwave for just a minute or so. Uneaten canned food in the plate should also not be left out after the kitten has had her fill, as it can spoil rapidly.

At the same time your kitten is learning to eat from a dish, she can also learn to drink water from a dish. Use a sturdy ceramic bowl and place it where the kitten can find it easily. You may have to dabble your fingers in the water at first to show the kitten what it is. Don't be surprised if there is a little splashing and water fun before kitty discovers it is to be taken internally.

The Litter Thing

Use a low-sided box for training - the lid to a shoe box would work. A pellet-type litter is generally recommended, but not the clumping style. Kittens will experiment with eating litter and the clumping type is murder on the intestines. Once the kitten starts eating on its own, just put her in the box around 15 minutes after eating. Scratch the litter a bit with your finger to show her what it's all about. If she hops out, put her back in again a couple times, then leave her alone. If she makes a mistake and poops on the floor, pick a small amount up and put it in the box to show her where it belongs. She'll get the idea sooner or later, and more likely sooner.
post #12 of 29
Sending mega prayers and vibes that your kitten feels better soon, one way or another
post #13 of 29
I hate seeing threads like this when we get no closure
post #14 of 29
Is there any way you could take the kitten to a rescue group? You are doing a great job at helping him/her, but it seems like there needs to be more than just the basic stuff done.
post #15 of 29
In a pinch I've given goat's milk...
If the kitten is over weaning age I have done Nutri-cal or similar just to get some nutrition in.
post #16 of 29
At 6-7 weeks of age, shouldn't the kitten be past the "fading kitten syndrome" phase, usually? The kitten should really be weaning or at least working in that direction. Maybe I'm wrong there...but this is really something that a vet needs to tend to...it will most likely be very treatable with the right antibiotic or medicine. And then, that leads me to my next question...which is, why would a rescue group allow a family to foster animals that will then refuse the animals medical attention in the event of an emergency??? Won't most reputable organizations screen their foster families better than this???

There is no reason why this kitten should be suffering, and no reason why this kitten shouldn't be seen by a vet, particularly if it's an upper respiratory infection, or something of that nature. I would like to know what rescue organization is allowing these people to foster.

Sorry for sounding so harsh, but it just strikes me as very bizarre, and highly negligent.
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Yesterday, she seemed to be doing a little better but she still wasn't eating so I forcefed her some kma and water through a syringe. A while later I put food in her mouth, on piece at a time, and she actually ate a little. I'm going to convince my mom to take her to the vet because she is looking weaker this morning.


Jake
post #18 of 29
CALL THE RESCUE!!!! Maybe they will even come and get the kitten. If it has been sick for this many days it really needs to see a vet.
post #19 of 29
As for the kitten. I agree about calling the rescue. When i had to give up Tinker's babies this week i called them and asked where to take them. they immediately asked my address and in less than 30 minutes they were here picking them up.

PLEASE do this, it's critical to the life of that precious kitten
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
This morning, we took it to the shelter and they said it had Feline Panleukopenia or fpv which is an extremely contagious virus that attacks the immune system. The other 2 kittens most likely have it and it can lay dormant for up to a year. This sucks for my other 2 house cats. We are keeping the two in quarantine and bleached/pinesolled the entire house along with a butload of vacuuming. We are taking the others to the animal shelter tomorrow. As for the other kitten, she is now an .
post #21 of 29
RIP little kitty
Do not worry for the other cats if they have been vaccinated,and all kittens are normally vaccinated for this starting at 8 weeks and the vaccine I have read other members of this forum say is 100% effective....
I am surprised by this who situation also. I am wondering why the kitten was allowed to be away from the mother at 6-7 weeks and even if the mother died or was a feral, a kitten this small requires extra special care and should not be fostered at all IMO. Don't they normally keep kittens like this at the humane society until they are old enough to be adopted??? What a risky age, most vets don't vaccinate until 8 weeks, so to get sick at 6-7 weeks is really bad luck..
post #22 of 29
The catch on kittens being vaccinated - they probably won't have immunity until they've had the distemper booster (meaning, here, they get the first shot, then need the booster 3-4 weeks later, and one week after that they have full immunity - so usually approx 10 weeks of age have immunity, if not later). And I've even seen fully vaccinated adult cats die from distemper in the right circumstances.

Kittens that young at a humane society are very susceptible to everything - we normally foster out as many kittens as possible as the ones at the shelter get sick rapidly. Here, bottle fed kittens are always in foster care, and we get many in at 4 weeks we put into foster care as they don't get the care they require in a cage at the shelter.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut0pia View Post
RIP little kitty
Do not worry for the other cats if they have been vaccinated,and all kittens are normally vaccinated for this starting at 8 weeks and the vaccine I have read other members of this forum say is 100% effective....
I am surprised by this who situation also. I am wondering why the kitten was allowed to be away from the mother at 6-7 weeks and even if the mother died or was a feral, a kitten this small requires extra special care and should not be fostered at all IMO. Don't they normally keep kittens like this at the humane society until they are old enough to be adopted??? What a risky age, most vets don't vaccinate until 8 weeks, so to get sick at 6-7 weeks is really bad luck..
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
The catch on kittens being vaccinated - they probably won't have immunity until they've had the distemper booster (meaning, here, they get the first shot, then need the booster 3-4 weeks later, and one week after that they have full immunity - so usually approx 10 weeks of age have immunity, if not later). And I've even seen fully vaccinated adult cats die from distemper in the right circumstances.

Kittens that young at a humane society are very susceptible to everything - we normally foster out as many kittens as possible as the ones at the shelter get sick rapidly. Here, bottle fed kittens are always in foster care, and we get many in at 4 weeks we put into foster care as they don't get the care they require in a cage at the shelter.

That is exactly what I was going to say. Young kittens have a much better chance in a foster then in a shelter cage where many cats come in sick and pass it on to every one else, and the kittens get sick very easy in a shelter invironment
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hi,
This is IndyBoo's grandma. I just read my son's comments about our foster kittens. Just wanted to clarify a few things about the care they were receiving. We got a call from the county animal shelter to foster 3 kittens that had been abandoned. We have fostered around 5 litters in the past few years alternating with puppies. The animal shelter does not have the funds/staff to properly care for sick or young/unweaned kittens and needs all the volunteers they can get. They ask that volunteers keep them until they are well enough to have had all of their vaccines which we take them back for at given dates. When we picked up the kittens we noticed one had a runny nose and a little bit of an eye infection so I asked for Clavimox which they gladly gave us along with eye ointment. 2 of the kittens came down with URI symptoms within a few days. The third kitten Ella seemed healthy and thriving. All 3 kittens were receiving meds 2x daily and after 5-7 days the 2 were doing much better. By the 7th day Ella had started to show signs of the URI and we thought it was just running it's course with her. Within 2 days, she had lost her appetite and seemed to be getting worse. We called the volunteer coordinator on Monday and asked her opinion and she suggested we continue meds and syringe water/food as often as possible to keep her hydrated. Tuesday she seemed a little better so we continued keeping her warm, keeping her nostrils open w/vapors and moisture from the bath along with syringes of oatmeal, water, salt, solution. By Wed. afternoon she still had no appetite and continued to get worse through the evening even though we were keeping her hydrated. The volunteer was aware and we knew we would take her in as soon as their vet was on call after 12pm. We have had healthy young kittens take a quick turn and the vet had said it was failing kitten. As soon as I got her there she was tested and found to have Panleuk. Sadly they had to put her to sleep since there was no cure and she did not need to experience the pain of her organs shutting down. We do have to take the other 2 healthy, thriving kittens in to be tested tomorrow. This is very hard to do and breaks my heart. The virus is highly contagious and the shelter said they are likely to have the disease or will have it soon. This breaks my heart but then again, I know we have given them a few weeks of love and care that they would not have gotten sitting in a 2 x 2 cage alone while getting sick or worse not given a chance because of not enough room at the shelter. Our other cats have been vaccinated but I'm double checking to make sure they are updated for PLV tomorrow with our vet.
post #25 of 29
I hate to say it - but the odds of the remaining 2 kittens surviving are not good. You will need to prepare yourselves for the worst, but it sounds like you may be already.

A couple of thoughts....it is remotely possible for your fully vaccinated adults to get it despite vaccines, so talk to the vet about that risk tomorrow (see what they think the risk is). You cannot foster kittens now for awhile, without risking them getting distemper/panleuk, unless you've been keeping these guys pretty "contained" (hard to do at that age!).

I brought home some distemper kittens to do what I could overnight, but sadly none made it to the vet in the morning to be euthanized. At least they did not die in a cage, but I kept them in my bathroom. The entire bathroom was bleached to high heaven, and none of my foster kittens have been in there since then (and I continue to bleach it down very well).
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyBoo View Post
Hi,
This is IndyBoo's grandma. ..
Thanks for the clarification and extra information. I for one was wondering what the devil was going on.

Also, thank you for your volunteer work. It sounds like your help is desperately needed in your area and you are doing a wonderful job.

I'm sorry the outlook isn't good for the remaining kittens. I hope they beat the odds. They are lucky to have you and your grandson to care for them.
post #27 of 29
WOW.. i feel sorry for you guys and the poor kitten who didnt make it. Good thing they know that these things happen sometimes, and that this was not their fault. Despite the fact that the remaining kittens outlook doesnt look too good, im sending for the babies, that they make it through ok.
post #28 of 29
I do not want to scare you or anything but one of the pounds in Sacramento had a big outbreak of Distemper and they had to have most the cats and kittens pts.
They were looking for the people that adopted cats and kittens from there.
It was a big mess.
I posted it I think in breaking news when it happened.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyBoo View Post
This morning, we took it to the shelter and they said it had Feline Panleukopenia or fpv which is an extremely contagious virus that attacks the immune system. The other 2 kittens most likely have it and it can lay dormant for up to a year. This sucks for my other 2 house cats. We are keeping the two in quarantine and bleached/pinesolled the entire house along with a butload of vacuuming. We are taking the others to the animal shelter tomorrow. As for the other kitten, she is now an .
Bless you for all the valiant work that you have done for the precious kitten
Sending prayers and vibes that your other house cats remain safe, & that, one way or another, the other kittens do not suffer from the FLP virus
Although the outcome was a sad one, the experience you gained from caring for her will serve you well in helping future kitties - she did not die, suffering alone in a field or an abandoned lot somewhere, but rather, spending her too-short life with you, knowing comfort and love; in a sad way, her life was given to advance your skills as a cat rescuer. Heaven will reward her for this, and you too
You didn't give up and when the time came, you made the courageous sacrifice of allowing her a peaceful passing instead of "hanging on" until all options expired
Keep up the good work
Susan
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