TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Breaking Mews › California passes restrictive truck emissions laws
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

California passes restrictive truck emissions laws

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
http://www.landlinemag.com/Special_R...21208_CARB.htm

Essentially, CA is requiring all the trucks in the United States to meet the very tough 2007 laws, even if they were perfectly legal when they were made, and even if they are perfectly legal in every other state, if they are going to haul any loads into or out of CA. This means, basically, that many trucks will be unable to deliver loads or pick up loads in CA, restricting the number of trucks available to haul CA loads, thus forcing up freight rates.

The cost to upgrade a 2004 truck to 2007 rules is about $10,000. Upgrading a 2004 truck to 2010 rules will cost nearly $20,000.

Imagine this: You buy a 2005 Chevy Impala. You head off for vacation, planning to visit Yosemite. You get to the check station in Truckee, and you're told you have to turn around and go back to Reno, because your car isn't legal in CA. Don't think that's coming? CA has already said that is its goal, to eliminate all "polluting" vehicles for its roads.

(Just as an aside, the Canadian authorities in Quebec and Ontario begin enforcing the speed limiter law on trucks today. Their stated goal there, and the goal of some legislators in the U.S., is to slow all the trucks first, then apply the same laws to cars, thus making the maximum speed limit in both countries whatever they choose to make it, enforced by your own car.)

http://www.landlinemag.com/todays_ne.../123108-01.htm
post #2 of 16
Right up there with their new "Carbon Defecit Car" rule that went in effect today as well.
post #3 of 16
I'm concerned with this concept of making laws retroactive. I don't argue with their goal of making vehicle emissions cleaner, but applying it to vehicles that are currently legal according to what the law required when they were made? How about if you've got a 1965 Chevy pickup? A vehicle in good repair and meeting all emission requirements in effect when it was made in 1965?

And how about if this retroactivity is applied to other laws? What if they reduce the speed limit to 60 mph but then issue me a speeding ticket for going 65 mph back when the speed limit was 65 mph? It sounds ridiculous, I know, and it's taking the principle to a degree that doesn't make any sense, but it IS the same principle. Just consider how many laws there are that don't make any sense. And how much less sense to make them retroactive.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
California already has a "retroactive speeding law." When they examine a truck driver's log book, they take how many miles he's come since his last break, divide it by the hours it took to do it, and if it comes out over 50 mph, they write him a speeding ticket (minimum $450) because they say it's not possible to average over 50 mph in any state.

Californians are going to have to drive their Priuii out to the border to get their clothes, groceries, etc., I guess.
post #5 of 16
Aaaaahhh, California. So glad I left.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
Californians are going to have to drive their Priuii out to the border to get their clothes, groceries, etc., I guess.
Is "Priuii" the plural form of the name?? I have to write that down
post #7 of 16
California often leads the rest of the country in trends. Not just social, but economic, legal, etc. If you don't like what's going on in California, it doesn't bode well for the rest of the country.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
California already has a "retroactive speeding law." When they examine a truck driver's log book, they take how many miles he's come since his last break, divide it by the hours it took to do it, and if it comes out over 50 mph, they write him a speeding ticket (minimum $450) because they say it's not possible to average over 50 mph in any state.
Do you know which counties do this??? My job at the office is traffic assist and I have NEVER come across such a thing in 8 years yet. I have seen log book violations but never a speeding ticket given because of lbv. I have assisted with cases in at least 4 counties.
Also, California allows a Trial By Written Declaration which lets a driver go to the state's website for free, download fillable forms, with instructions, so the driver can pay bail and submit a TWD. If the result isn't good, then the driver can request a Trial De Novo and then either appear for himself or hire an attorney to appear for him at a court trial; often the judge will allow a reduction to a lesser, no-points violation.
For the record, although most trucks that I pass are also speeding, I disagree with CA's basic speed law for commercial vehicles, esp. on the narrow stretches of 2 lane highway (which still exist because CA does not get its fair share of fed. highway dollars). Cars following slow-moving trucks (even those going 65mph) get frustrated and consequently make unsafe passes Part of the frustration is that out West, destinations are so far apart - on U.S. 395, for instance, Victorville and Ridgecrest are the last 2 towns over 10,000 pop. until Carson City, NV,over 300 miles away---that's alot (too much, even) of countryside for some folks.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Every scale will write those tickets. I've seen the drivers come into the Fontana terminal with the tickets and have to have a meeting with the Safety Department (which you have to do, every time you get a ticket).

It's not bad enough they write them for CA. They'll write them when you've been in CA less than an hour!

There are good reasons drivers call CA "the Gestapo state," when it comes to truck enforcement. More and more companies are dropping their CA registration and only driving in 46 states (Oregon is the other one that causes a lot of trouble, mainly over its ridiculous permit and fuel tax laws). Many owner/operators will not accept loads to those two states. The effect is raising the cost of everything shipped into and out of CA.

The split speed limit is just totally stupid. CA is one of the very few states where car/truck accidents have increased in recent years, and the split speed limit is one reason. If 55 is so safe, why not make everyone go that speed?
post #10 of 16
Callifornia is in a HUUUUUUUUGE financial hole. I don't doubt all this is an intentional effort to raise revenues. But it's apparently already started to come around full circle and kick them in their own behind. When businesses start avoiding the state, California loses their tax revenue.
post #11 of 16
The pollution in CA is a big problem! The coastal pollution blows inland, where I live. It's quite dense and brown- you can see layers of brown- and we have advisories to not run. Children are advised to not run at recess. I realize this has a big financial impact on you, as you truck for a living... but as a resident of CA, in one of the dirtiest counties, I'm glad to see attempts to clean up the air I breathe. We have a large population, so our big cities do produce a bit of pollution.

I've also seen billboards for grant programs to get your truck upgraded. These rules aren't just for trucks, they're for everyone. I recently bought a vehicle and it came with a "California Emissions System." I do feel for you, some of my family members drive for a living... trucks and buses. Still, I don't want the air here to be like... China.

My mom has a view of the Los Angeles skyline from her apartment- on clear days. It's so smoggy some days, that you can't see a single skyscraper.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
Callifornia is in a HUUUUUUUUGE financial hole. I don't doubt all this is an intentional effort to raise revenues. But it's apparently already started to come around full circle and kick them in their own behind. When businesses start avoiding the state, California loses their tax revenue.
Unfortunately, a large majority of shipments through the western U.S. come through the Port of Long Beach.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Going Nova View Post
Unfortunately, a large majority of shipments through the western U.S. come through the Port of Long Beach.
But it doesn't have to.

The L.A. ports have also just instituted draconian requirements on the drayage companies pulling loads out of the ports. For all practical purposes, they have put all the owner/operators out of business in favor of only allowing large companies in.

A number of shipping companies are already talking about moving their business to Mexico and completely bypassing California.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
But it doesn't have to.

The L.A. ports have also just instituted draconian requirements on the drayage companies pulling loads out of the ports. For all practical purposes, they have put all the owner/operators out of business in favor of only allowing large companies in.

A number of shipping companies are already talking about moving their business to Mexico and completely bypassing California.
That's interesting (to say the least). Would the truck jobs be based out of Mexico as well? Are there restrictions in the U.S. regarding foreign trucks? It would be terrible for our (California's) foundering economy if the ports were bypassed. I have a slew of complaints about how money is used in this state... but that's stuff for a whole different thread!
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Going Nova View Post
The pollution in CA is a big problem! The coastal pollution blows inland, where I live. It's quite dense and brown- you can see layers of brown-
It's been 15 years since I've flown into there, so I can't imagine it's any better, but I can clearly remember seeing the dome of smog over southern CA, sometimes extending all the way out to Palm Springs. When you get a western wind, which is common, it blows through those gaps in the coastal ranges and spills out into the inland desert. You can't appreciate air pollution until you can see it from the clean, clear air above.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
It is possible to completely bypass CA and bring freight in at AZ crossings or Canadian ports. Plus, Seattle and Portland would like more business.

The problem, of course, is that the federal government set up a program that will eventually, over time, get the trucks cleaned up by attrition. CA just wants to speed it up.

But CA needs to be careful; it would not be impossible for other states to pass retribution laws, such as requiring any truck registered in CA to obey the CA truck speed limit (55 mph) anywhere in the country.

As to the foreign trucks, most freight coming into the US from MX is brought in and cross-docked in a border city.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Breaking Mews
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Breaking Mews › California passes restrictive truck emissions laws