New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

CFA question

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I will precede my question with a fact. I had Persi nuetered as soon as he was four months old, which the vet told me was the very earliest he would do it. I bought Persi as a pet but out of pride, after owning nine moggies, had a Persian cat to present to my Persian wife. When I received the CFA registration I did not examine it closely, but made sure his official name of
Van Court's Persian Delight was correct. And into the file drawer under Cats it went.

This morning I was going through my files and came across the Cats file. I checked to make sure the cats were in good shape with vet visits and so forth and noticed Persi's registration with the CFA. What I had not noticed earlier jumped out at me: Not for Breeding. I have no idea what this is all about. What would keep me from breeding Persi had I not nuetered him and what does this signify? Does it mean that something is wrong with him? Both of his parents are champions, I have their records. So what gives? I am truly mystified.
post #2 of 10
He is not to be bred according to his Breeder. He may be from champions, but his Breeder sold him as a "pet", not for you you to breed him. If you ever tried to, his papers would show, he wasnt suppose to be.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pami View Post
He is not to be bred according to his Breeder. He may be from champions, but his Breeder sold him as a "pet", not for you you to breed him. If you ever tried to, his papers would show, he wasnt suppose to be.
Thank you for your swift reply! Why do breeders do this? Are they afraid of competition? I only wanted a pet and had no intention of breeding him. I certainly did not get a discount for Not to be Bred, I paid $800 for him and the breeder never discussed with me that he was not to be bred. All of this is academic now since Persi was nuetered, but I am now still wondering what is the difference between a kitten being sold that does NOT have not for breeding on his registration.
post #4 of 10
A kitten with breeding rights, from a reputable breeder, would be $1500 or a lot more. $800 is typical for a pet-quality, or alter, kitten.
post #5 of 10
Simple, when a breeder sells you a kitten for a pet, the cat is neutered and is not to be used for breeding - if he is, then when you go to register kittens, CFA will not accept the litter registration. Its in their records the cat is not to be used.

Even if its a show alter, the box still would be checked by the breeder. Your cat is out of champion parents; doesn't mean he's bad or anything - just that the breeder feels he's not quite up to the standard to be a show cat.

With Charlie, we bought him as a pet; he turned out to be more show quality and the breeder let us show him (he's Grand in ACFA and only needs 19 pts to Grand in CFA).

With Jack, I requested a "show" quality cat, and expect him to be a lot better then Charlie is. I know Charlie's faults (minor ones) and would not show them against each other because Jack will be better.

If you are interested in showing, you could contact his breeder and have them evaluate and see if he would do fairly well in the alter classes.
post #6 of 10
My Cleo can be shown.
I was asked what I wanted before I got her.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Persi & Alley View Post
Why do breeders do this? Are they afraid of competition? I only wanted a pet and had no intention of breeding him. I certainly did not get a discount for Not to be Bred, I paid $800 for him and the breeder never discussed with me that he was not to be bred. All of this is academic now since Persi was nuetered, but I am now still wondering what is the difference between a kitten being sold that does NOT have not for breeding on his registration.
This is very common practice. All pet cats are sold "Not for Breeding" and some "Not for Showing". This is not due to competition. In our case Breeding rights are only granted to established catteries otherwise our kittens are spayed and neutered before going to their new homes. We will mark "Not for Showing" if the cat has a flaw when compared to the written standard. These flaws do not make the cat any less of a pet. In fact the mismarked ones are usually the first to go.
post #8 of 10
Lee, you've already been given the correct replies, but I thought I'd add my own in as well.

I sell my pet bengal kittens at $1,000 to $1,500 and their papers are all marked, not for breeding. Some of them are marked that showing is ok. It's case by case, as a showable kitten would be representing our cattery.

Our bengal kittens that are marked ok for breeding only go to other breeders, never to pet buyers. Their prices are considerably higher, at least twice as much as pet price.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thank all of you for your answers. I will sleep a lot better tonight. Isn't it crazy what thoughts can go through your mind? It's funny now that I see your answers. Like I say, even though I nuetered Persi immediately when I saw that Not For Breeding two years after the fact, I was prepared to be in a foul mood all night. As I mentioned, Persi was my first pedigreed cat so I was operating without the facts. Thanks to your answers, I can now have a pleasant evening.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Persi & Alley View Post
What would keep me from breeding Persi had I not nuetered him
Really, nothing could prevent you from breeding him had you not neutered him. This is why most breeders alter before kittens are adopted out.

There are many Ragdoll BYB's here at the moment, all the original people would have gotten their kittens just as you did and then not altered them.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding