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cats and bonding

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Well most of you know I'm getting ready to adopt another cat and I was hoping to get some advise before I go out looking.

To me, the most important part of a cat is the bond that is shared, to me, my cat is my best friend. That said, I am going to do my best to keep this new cat inside...(all my cats have always been indoor/outdoor, since I was 3). Because of this I'm thinking that maybe I should get two cats. Would this make the bond between me and the cat less strong?

Also, would getting a adult cat make the bond less strong? I really do enjoy kittens, being able to help teach them and see how I help shape their personality and temperment, and alot of time I find adult cats already have shaped their own by them and they have a harder time bonding (Oliver comes to mind). Do you find this to be so? Am I just over thinking?

If you have any other advise before I go to the shelters, it would mean alot. Thank you
post #2 of 13
Didn't your roomate have a hard time when Mai Sai would go near her quilting? A kittten definately will need you to make adjustments in the house while it is learning the proper behavoir. Is your roomate okay with this? Does she really understand what may need to be done? Keeping cords and small things away from those teeth and claws... Just something to think about.

I don't think getting two will lessen the bond with you. You will get twice the love! Remember that cats choose who they give their love to also....sometimes it doesn't matter what you do.

older kitties can be more cuddly and serene. You can also have a better understanding of their personalities before you take them home. Kittens develop theirs, which is part nature part nuture I think. IMHO

ReeRee is a hellraiser! and he was my only cat that has grown up under my roof. The other two are grown.

Whether you get a an older kitty or a kitten I would look for one that is 'chill'. Laid back, just happy to be here.

Two kitties are super fun, and they teach each other the proper etiquette when it comes to mouthing and using claws. They can also goad each other into trouble.....2x the fun...2 x the trouble.

I am sure others will have some great advice for you. I can't wait to meet the kitty(s) whichever way you choose!
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fifi1puss View Post
Didn't your roomate have a hard time when Mai Sai would go near her quilting? A kittten definately will need you to make adjustments in the house while it is learning the proper behavoir. Is your roomate okay with this? Does she really understand what may need to be done? Keeping cords and small things away from those teeth and claws... Just something to think about.
hmm this is a good point. My room mate does know I'm thinking of two cats and I have cleared it with her, but I didn't think about the quilting frame...and keeping them inside would probably make that more of a problem. Do you think a older cat would have a easier time with it? I'm not to worried about the rest, Mai Sai was a kitten after all, and we did pretty well with him.

I guess one of the reasons I'm thinking of a older cat is I'm hoping to get one used to being inside so they don't keep running for the door....It's going to be hard with Tess (the room mate's cat) being indoor/outdoor, thats what finally broke him last time to letting Mai Sai be that way..

Ideally (though I doubt it would be to possible) would be to find one who is very well known. I am having issues finding ones in foster homes that are what I'm looking for...I wish there was a way of telling these things in a shelter, but I know there isn't
post #4 of 13
It can be hard to know the cat before hand without a fosters help. I agree.

None of my cats had a hard time adjusting to indoor living. Although Fiona has gotten out twice...she is a quick one!

I give them lots to enjoy inside so they stay out of mischeif. I know they are getting antsy and bored when they start paying attention to stuff they shouldn't Like last night......so I did one of their fav things and made a big show of getting all their toys out from under the couch and stove....they were tuckered out and satisfied playing with toys they hadn't seen in a while.

Rocko is my 8 yr old and is sssslllooowwww. So him "running" out the door is not gonna happen. He is just so calm and so relaxed. The shelter staff loved him. They all remarked on how "sweet" he was. Their were notes all over his file.

I think the curiosity with the door is not them knowing whats on the other side is the not knowing....and the fact that WE can go through it but they can't..... it kills them

Trust your instincts.
post #5 of 13
In my personal experience, an older cat will also be likely to bother your roommates quilting frame. If you get a kitten I would recommend two because they will entertain one another and wear each other out playing leaving them somewhat less likely to get bored and look for trouble. I never had a problem with Ramsay and Andy, who were adopted together (separate litters though). They played with each other when we were too busy to play with them. Gus, on the other hand, was adopted alone and has been a trouble maker since day one. It could just be the cats, but I'm convinced it was the fact that Ramsay and Andy were playmates, and Gus was on his own (despite having an older cat, cause he couldn't keep up with Gus).

As far as getting outside, all of my cats have always been indoor only. Nobody has ever even tried to get out. Ramsay went outside once (on a leash) and hated it. When the door opens he moves away from the door. Gus loves going outside, but only goes out on a leash and has never tried to get out on his own.
post #6 of 13
Most of the cats I have had were kittens when I got them and they have never known "outside" and in fact hated to be taken out. I have had a few that just showed up to adopt me and after being in for a while became quite content to be indoors, I suspect they were someones pets that got out. I would suspect that the hardest ones to train to be content indoors would be ferals, outside is all they know. If possible ask the cat's history, a cat that is used to being inside may be easier to keep inside and as mentioned there are pros and cons both ways regarding kitten or adult. I think you will know when you find the right one, the rest will work itself out.
post #7 of 13
I personally like kittens around 4-7 months old. That's how old Brady and Bruschi were when I got them. I got them from the same foster home and they were very helpful in pointing out their personalities. All my cats were outside at one time before me....alll were strays. If you are careful and keep them in, I don't think they even miss the out doors. I would never let my 3 out....we not only have a lot of traffic but I have seen fox and coyotes in our neighborhood. I would worry sick f they went out.
post #8 of 13
I had kittens all my life - meaning, little, very young, anywhere from days old, to a couple months old when I got them.
Lucky is the first one I got from a rescuer, and a little older too - she was 8 months when she came in... and we bonded just the same... I would say maybe even more, because I am probably the first person she got to trust...
If I was to adopt another baby, which I am thinking about it, I would have no problem adopting an older kitten, or an adult cat... But again, that is just me... As far as going outside, mine runs from the door - they like the safety from the inside, as long as you keep them entertained.

Good Luck, I am so happy you are doing that!
post #9 of 13
You might want to ask the shelter if they have an older, declawed cat. We almost always have one or two, often real cuddlers.

Punkin will take off outside in a blind panic. Sterling will sneak outside. But you can't drag Ella out of the house.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
You might want to ask the shelter if they have an older, declawed cat. We almost always have one or two, often real cuddlers.

Punkin will take off outside in a blind panic. Sterling will sneak outside. But you can't drag Ella out of the house.
hmm that might be a good idea if I'm going to be keeping them in anyways. Honestly I dont know much about declawed cats besides its a cruel thing to do. Is there any health issues I need to know about?
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by othie View Post
hmm that might be a good idea if I'm going to be keeping them in anyways. Honestly I dont know much about declawed cats besides its a cruel thing to do. Is there any health issues I need to know about?
If you get a declawed cat, you MUST keep it inside only, as they can not defend themselves on the streets... Good Luck!
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
If you get a declawed cat, you MUST keep it inside only, as they can not defend themselves on the streets... Good Luck!
right, but I mean, do they have more problems with their joints? or perhaps more issues when they get older?
post #13 of 13
I think you bond individually with two cats just as much as one. They like having eachother's company, but that doesn't replace their connection with you. It's also nice for them to have eachother's company when you're not home so they don't feel so lonely. My little guy cries and cries when he sees me putting on my coat and shoes to leave. I probably need a second cat too About age, I got my boy at 7 months old. He's still very "kittenish" and playful, but not a baby. Young kittens demand more time. Older cats are nice too. They're already calm and not as rambunctious. It depends on your lifestyle and how much time you have I guess.
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