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Question on Swheat scoop litter...

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have noticed in two different reviews on the internet about Swheat scoop that someone keeps saying that it contains fusarium infested wheat which is highly toxic. Is there any truth to this and why would someone say this if it weren't true? I want to try the litter, but reading that has left me confused.
post #2 of 16
if it is toxic many many animals must be immune... I use a good amount of swheet without issue
post #3 of 16
I use Swheat Scoop, and have for years = no problems here either! That's the first I've heard about fusarium.
post #4 of 16
I found this thread while researching the connection between swheat, fusarium and cats, because I'm looking for a non-clay litter. I had similarly seen the postings about fusarium by somebody on other message boards.

I haven't done extensive research but I did find this: Swheat is indeed made from wheat that is infested with fusarium. It's not an internet rumor, it's touted by the manufacturers as progress in finding uses for "secondary products." Don't know if this link will work <http://renewingthecountryside.org/index.php?option=&mode=category&task=view&category=70&Itemid=43&limit=1&limitsta rt=13>

So the next question is: is it harmful to cats? I found several studies that indicate it is very toxic if ingested. So the NEXT question would be: how much needs to be ingested, and how much does the typical cat ingest? Some cats eat litter, some don't, but all are probably going to ingest a little when they're doing their cleaning or inhaling it.

According to one study, "Major symptoms of toxicity in cats as the result of T-2 toxin were emesis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, ataxia of the hind legs, discharge from the eyes and ejection of hemorrhagic fluid." So if you're using Swheat and you notice any symptoms remotely like that, you should be suspicious.

Seems to me from all my research there is no 100% safe product so you choose your poison. I guess each pet owner has to make their own decisions based on their own risk assessments.
post #5 of 16
We've been using it for well over a year now and no problems. If your cat eats massive quantities of litter, maybe then I would take pause, but I imagine that the amount they ingest via grooming is not enough to be concerned. I would also think that your cat's immune status is also to be considered.

Some people just need something to worry about
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomasb369 View Post
I found this thread while researching the connection between swheat, fusarium and cats, because I'm looking for a non-clay litter. I had similarly seen the postings about fusarium by somebody on other message boards.

I haven't done extensive research but I did find this: Swheat is indeed made from wheat that is infested with fusarium. It's not an internet rumor, it's touted by the manufacturers as progress in finding uses for "secondary products." Don't know if this link will work <http://renewingthecountryside.org/index.php?option=&mode=category&task=view&category=70&Itemid=43&limit=1&limitsta rt=13>

So the next question is: is it harmful to cats? I found several studies that indicate it is very toxic if ingested. So the NEXT question would be: how much needs to be ingested, and how much does the typical cat ingest? Some cats eat litter, some don't, but all are probably going to ingest a little when they're doing their cleaning or inhaling it.

According to one study, "Major symptoms of toxicity in cats as the result of T-2 toxin were emesis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, ataxia of the hind legs, discharge from the eyes and ejection of hemorrhagic fluid." So if you're using Swheat and you notice any symptoms remotely like that, you should be suspicious.

Seems to me from all my research there is no 100% safe product so you choose your poison. I guess each pet owner has to make their own decisions based on their own risk assessments.
I know for a FACT that SWHEAT SCOOP is not made with wheat that has fusarium or any other toxin in it. While the article you found has some nice things to say about the company, the only thing they got right in the article was that SWHEAT SCOOP is made from wheat and that the company is in Minnesota. They even have the names of the owners switched around! Secondary wheat is not labeled secondary because it has a blight; it simply does not meet the specs for a food grade. This usually just means that it has a lower protein content. There is no more toxin in SWHEAT SCOOP than in the loaf of bread you buy in the store.

So the next time you go on a fact-finding mission, you might want to start with the company first before spreading rumor and inuendo. You may find there are still plenty of honest people in the world who stand behind a safe, quality product and would be happy to help you.
post #7 of 16
I liked Swheat, but when I switched to Litter Robot I had to give it up as it won't work with that machine.

I did NOT care for World's Best; it made my cat smell like Sour Mash Whiskey. I don't like Sour Mash Whiskey.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJAMELL View Post
I know for a FACT that SWHEAT SCOOP is not made with wheat that has fusarium or any other toxin in it. While the article you found has some nice things to say about the company, the only thing they got right in the article was that SWHEAT SCOOP is made from wheat and that the company is in Minnesota. They even have the names of the owners switched around! Secondary wheat is not labeled secondary because it has a blight; it simply does not meet the specs for a food grade. This usually just means that it has a lower protein content. There is no more toxin in SWHEAT SCOOP than in the loaf of bread you buy in the store.

So the next time you go on a fact-finding mission, you might want to start with the company first before spreading rumor and inuendo. You may find there are still plenty of honest people in the world who stand behind a safe, quality product and would be happy to help you.
In what capacity are you related to the Company to know this for a FACT, a you said, and be so passionate about it?
Just curious, as I don't think that the previous poster was spreading a rumor - she was just stating what information she found... That's something that we do often here, as we seek knowledge. That's all... Of course the companies/factories will give out information that is beneficial to them, and not necessarily to their customers... It is definitely not the place you want to search for problems in an specific product. It is up to us, conscious consumers, and responsible pet parents, to research what is better to their health anyway and anywhere we can.
post #9 of 16
I remember reading an article in a local newspaper, not local for me but read it online, interviewing a wheat farmer. I'm pretty sure it said that he grew wheat for the swheat company. And that the wheat was different that most wheat because it was formulated to have a high starch content and a low protien content.

I like swheat. After the fourth furry addition my pocket book started to hate it. So now its chicken feed which IMO works almost as good as swheat.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinalima View Post
In what capacity are you related to the Company to know this for a FACT, a you said, and be so passionate about it?
Just curious, as I don't think that the previous poster was spreading a rumor - she was just stating what information she found... That's something that we do often here, as we seek knowledge. That's all... Of course the companies/factories will give out information that is beneficial to them, and not necessarily to their customers... It is definitely not the place you want to search for problems in an specific product. It is up to us, conscious consumers, and responsible pet parents, to research what is better to their health anyway and anywhere we can.
I have been working for the company for 7 years and using SWHEAT SCOOP for my 12 cats this entire time. I also grew up on a farm and know a great deal about the growing of crops - especially wheat. The elevators that sell the wheat must first test all of their grains before selling it for any blight or imperfections. The wheat used in SWHEAT SCOOP is a non food-grade wheat which only means that it does not meet bakery specs. It does not mean that it is a blighted wheat - they would not sell that to anyone. This company is very conscientious and was started by a super family who have poured their heart and soul into making a safe litter not only for cats, but for their owners and the environment. I would not be working here or using the litter myself if I did not believe in it 100%. If anyone has any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the company - and me - directly. We would be happy to help!
post #11 of 16
I tried Swheat Scoop and personally, I didn't like it. I thought it got a very strong and unpleasant yeasty smell once peed in the slightest bit, and since I live in a super small apartment, odor control is very important to me. As far as the contents of the litter, I have no comment. If there's any chance that something could be unsafe for my cat (the Swiffer controversy is a good example), I don't use it. I love Feline Pine, but that's just me.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mycherona View Post
I tried Swheat Scoop and personally, I didn't like it. I thought it got a very strong and unpleasant yeasty smell once peed in the slightest bit, and since I live in a super small apartment, odor control is very important to me. As far as the contents of the litter, I have no comment. If there's any chance that something could be unsafe for my cat (the Swiffer controversy is a good example), I don't use it. I love Feline Pine, but that's just me.
I am now researching Swheat to verify that the manufacturer and any related companies are not connected with vivisection. Primarly because another sanctuary and I recently began working with Feline Pine and their Shelter Program. Over a week ago I was informed by a prominent member of the company of an upcoming change - that the company has been purchased by Arm & Hammer. The news is quite dismaying – both for the fact that Arm & Hammer (Church & Dwight) are notorious for vivisection, and that the wonderful people at Nature’s Earth Products, such as my contact, will soon and unexpectedly be out of a job.

As Arm and Hammer has long been under boycott for needlessly testing their products on animals, it is highly unlikely that I will continue to buy Feline Pine after March.

http://www.suite101.com/content/anim...essary-a279808
http://tangergreen.com/cruelty-free-...bobs-red-mill/
http://here.am/post/246253182/beagle...visection-labs


I received this via e-mail on January 13th. The first part is the official notice Claire was required to send out; while the second portion is her personal adieu:

[i]Dear Valued Customer:

We are pleased to announce that Nature’s Earth Products. Inc. has sold its Feline Pine® brand and Private Label Business to Church & Dwight Co., Inc.

We anticipate a smooth transition from Nature’s Earth Products to Church & Dwight and look forward to helping in this process. Your attention to this and subsequent communications are greatly appreciated, and thank you in advance for your support through this process.

We will communicate details on account transitions in the coming weeks and you will also hear from Church & Dwight on the timing and further information on the transition. In the meantime, please forward any questions you have to your NEP Divisional Sales Manager.

Thank you for your business and continued partnership.

......................................................

To my friends of animals, Shelters and Rescues,

The brand of Feline Pine cat litter was recently sold to Arm and Hammer.

Please order as much as you can and need between now and end of February, 2011 for Feline Pine at the current Shelter program pricing. It is doubtful they will continue a shelter program as it exists now.

I am so sad and so sorry ;' (
I will no longer be employed here after the end March.
Thank you all so much for you support and friendships even though it was just through the phone calls. I will miss you all so much!

Take Care and Be Well!

Claire xxx

And this came to me today:

[i]Dear Shelters and Rescues,
Last day to order for the shelter program will be March 11th.
There is no plan to continue any shelter program with Church and Dwight. (: - /)

Claire xxx


I have tried Swheat once. And if Swheat proves to be a trustworthy company, with my 31 feline friends I will probably begin using it after my supply of Feline Pine runs out.
post #13 of 16
Odd note about the odor absorbing ability of swheat.

IMO it does it really well without the strong stale cornflakes smell of the corn based litters like world's best.

In fact, its actually the main reason I buy it.

I do have a question for KJAMELL; I have been using Swheat for about six months, and I can never tell when the litter is "bad".

It never has an odor to it, and I have just been topping it off with fresh litter as its used (and spilled by my kitties).

Is there a good way to tell when its time to toss a batch of Swheat, or is it ok as long as it looks clean and there is no odor to just keep topping it off with fresh Swheat which over time keeps cycling new litter?
post #14 of 16
Thomas, I would like to thank you for your post, and my cat is VERY thankful as well. She started vomitting in May and at one point we had to take her to the emergency clinic as she had projectile vomitting. Extensive tests showed nothing wrong in her intestinal area and the attending vet suspected she had ingested something poisonous. She recovered but had continuous episodes of vomitting, every few days or so. After reading your post I finally made the connection. In May I had changed to Sweatscopp and at one point had seen the cat eating some of the litter. No, she is not deprived of any minerals, she gets top quality, no by-products food from a special pet store, no grocery food. She is a Maine Coon and has fur between her paw pads which she cleans after every use of the litter box. To make a long story short, after reading the post and checking the link to the website Thomas posted where the manufacturer claims also using wheat infested with Fusarium. I researched Fusarium and what i found scared the heck out of me. I stopped using Sweatscoop immediately and went back to regular unscented clay litter, and the vomitting has stopped !!!!! She is also more lively and acts normal again. Now I am not saying that each and every cat gets sick using wheat litter, but for the cat's sake, if your cat vomitts frequently and you use wheat litter, try something else, maybe the wheat litter is the culprit. Of course I agree with many posters that frequent vomitting, especially if it is not the occasional hairball throw-up, is a serious sign and a vet should be consulted. But we did this and nothing was found, this is a special emergency clinic and has VERY experienced vets. As with humans some individuals react to things others dont, cats are no different especially if they are older, our "baby" is 12 years old. So, I would like to thank Thomas again, for posting this here, i STRONGLY belive it saved our cat from the vomitting misery and maybe a illness.
Katzenfreund

QUOTE=thomasb369;2517621]I found this thread while researching the connection between swheat, fusarium and cats, because I'm looking for a non-clay litter. I had similarly seen the postings about fusarium by somebody on other message boards.

I haven't done extensive research but I did find this: Swheat is indeed made from wheat that is infested with fusarium. It's not an internet rumor, it's touted by the manufacturers as progress in finding uses for "secondary products." Don't know if this link will work <http://renewingthecountryside.org/index.php?option=&mode=category&task=view&category=70&Itemid=43&limit=1&limitsta rt=13>

So the next question is: is it harmful to cats? I found several studies that indicate it is very toxic if ingested. So the NEXT question would be: how much needs to be ingested, and how much does the typical cat ingest? Some cats eat litter, some don't, but all are probably going to ingest a little when they're doing their cleaning or inhaling it.

According to one study, "Major symptoms of toxicity in cats as the result of T-2 toxin were emesis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, ataxia of the hind legs, discharge from the eyes and ejection of hemorrhagic fluid." So if you're using Swheat and you notice any symptoms remotely like that, you should be suspicious.

Seems to me from all my research there is no 100% safe product so you choose your poison. I guess each pet owner has to make their own decisions based on their own risk assessments.[/quote]
post #15 of 16

I think I have finally found out why my cat has the terrible runs...I was completely baffled as nothing has changed in his diet/lifestyle etc...started using Swheat Scoop about a month ago...and the runnyruns had started within the last week, maybe a bit longer.  I never would have thought Swheat Scoop was the culprit until last night. My 60 pound foster dog fell extremely ill. She was vomiting up white foamy moucusy stuff and also had the runs. She was trembling and panting terribly for hours. I called the emerg vet at 4am who advised me that it could be a bacterial infection (I was worried it was bloat) and I could prob wait till my reg vet opened up...so while I waited for the vet, I started to clean up the liquid poop and noticed small granules of something in it...still didnt put 2 and 2 together till I was about the head out to the vets and noticed the litter box lid flipped over...so yep it surely was the SwheatScoop that made my dog terribly ill...and by the looks of the contents of the litter box, she didnt injest a whole lot...so now I can pretty much say its also what is making my cat ill. I will no longer be buying SwheatScoop. I would recommend that anyone that has dogs that tend to look for "snacks" in the litter box (c'mon, you know they do it! lol) to STOP using it immediately. My dog has NO wheat allergies to boot. So if a small amount of this stuff did this to her, Id hate to see what happens when a dog ingests much more. Scary!

post #16 of 16

Swheat Scoop is a mainstream product available at any Petsmart I have gone to.   I find it unlikely that you coincidentally happen to have two animals that both happened to have issues with wheat.   One of the product founders in a video at their expo even ate some himself.  

 

Swheat Scoop is literally just naturally processed wheat that is highly dried and bagged, and one of the primary benefits of such an organic product is that it is not harmful like clay litter if a dog were to eat it.  

 

I would wait to get a real diagnosis from your veterinarian first.

 

Your cat may have had the runs from salmonella poisoning for example, and if the dog ate the poo, then he too could become very ill from that, and it would have nothing to do with the litter, so its important to verify cause and effect before sounding the alarm IMO.  smile.gif

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