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Feline Upper Respiratory Infection

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
My four month old kitten, Wendel, came with an FURI. At the vet appointment the day after I picked him up they prescribed amoxicillin for secondary bacterial infection. He is still sneezing a fair bit (off and on throughout the day) and occasionally has a watery right eye which is sometimes caked with hard discharge. Despite this he is extremely active and has not had any other evidence of illness. He hasn't had an out of litter box accident, he plays with his toys, grooms himself and eats well and seems in general health except for the eye and sneezing. How long can I expect that this will continue? He is taken into the bathroom whenever someone showers to increase humidity. Is there anything else I can do? I just want this little guy to grow up healthy and want to give him the best.
post #2 of 15
Has he seen the vet again.
Sometimes after uri's they get that way.
I have a cat with the herpes virus who acts fine but her eyes drip all over sometimes.
I would call the vet and see if he still has a infection.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
He just saw the vet on Sunday (six days ago) when it was diagnosed. It's not getting worse at all. I think he's getting better but I was wondering how long to expect it to take for him to get over it altogether.
post #4 of 15
It really depends on the cat.
Sometimes it takes 2 weeks before its all gone.
post #5 of 15
From my own (long) eprience, it's really a week to 10 days before all is back to 100% normal. If it goes beyond that, I would be back at the Vet's doorstep.

I would do the "steam-therapy" thing several times a day...'works wonders. The "crusty" eye"...warm water on some tissue paper works wonders for that. Oh, as for any
Quote:
out of litter box accident
those are mostly NOT accidents, and require immediate attention. They are generally indicative of a urinary/gastro problem, some of these are life-threatening. Tip #1: keep a close eye on the litter box...learn the pattern of what's happening there...if there's a change, understand that there's something up...no "wait and see", find out what's going on; then ask here (or research and learn now while he's healthy. Need reputable sites? Ask.)

This is a MUST: Feline Nutrition 101 (short and FREE) (oh, and NOT a "contraversial" site)

[b]DISCLAIMER
1. I am not a Veterinarian.
2. I have been advised to tell you that "no one can diagnose a cat online".
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_SK View Post
My four month old kitten, Wendel, came with an FURI. At the vet appointment the day after I picked him up they prescribed amoxicillin for secondary bacterial infection. He is still sneezing a fair bit (off and on throughout the day) and occasionally has a watery right eye which is sometimes caked with hard discharge. Despite this he is extremely active and has not had any other evidence of illness. He hasn't had an out of litter box accident, he plays with his toys, grooms himself and eats well and seems in general health except for the eye and sneezing. How long can I expect that this will continue? He is taken into the bathroom whenever someone showers to increase humidity. Is there anything else I can do? I just want this little guy to grow up healthy and want to give him the best.
10-14 days is the ave ...

Keep a close eye on it

If it gets better and comes back you may be dealing with a herpes cat... here is a very easy to read article

http://www.thecatsite.com/Health/221...heitis.html://

http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8389 this link contains Lots of info ...

the nutrition 101 link has some very good info and some info that is very disputable ... You will find this is the norm for kitty nutrition as it is in it s infancy and even the true experts disagree on many points
post #7 of 15
If he has the Feline Herpes Virus it could continue for life. My cat has this and lives a normal life. I keep her eye clean and watch for the signs of infection like labored breathing, colored discharge from nose or eyes, or any significant changes like eating less or litter issues etc.

She has been on meds twice for URI's. Once when she was in the shelter and once with me.

Did your vet say anything about l-lysine? I was given it in conjunction with Fiona's meds to help boost her immunity. Next time you see the vet or if you want to call, ask them about the feline herpes virus and what can be done if your kitty does have it.

Hope little Wendel feels better soon! Sounds like you are a very caring owner. He is in good hands.
post #8 of 15
My vet says for a URI if you don't see notable improvement within 5 days on a med - then call him. He'll often prescribe a different anti-biotic then. If you're worried - call your vet to check with them if they think it's significant improvement or if they want to see your baby again.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
He seems to be on the mend here. His eye crusts are gone and it hasn't been runny in a few days. I do'nt think I've heard him sneeze in the past day or two either.

I meant to say that he has not had a single accident since we brought him home so I think that indicates some sign of good health as well. His energy is great and he seems generally content.

I'm really hoping he doesn't have herpes because I'd like for him to heal right up but I'll deal with whatever comes our way.

Thanks for all the support and advice!
post #10 of 15
I am glad he is better.
Meeko has a herpes flare up right now and her eyes are gross.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mews2much View Post
I am glad he is better.
Meeko has a herpes flare up right now and her eyes are gross.
mews2much, with the herpes virus, does it ever truly go away or is it only possible to control the symptoms while the virus forever lays dormant in the cat?

IF a cat previously had the herpes virus but is exhibiting no symptoms now, can it still be passed on to another cat?
post #12 of 15
Quote:
mews2much, with the herpes virus, does it ever truly go away or is it only possible to control the symptoms while the virus forever lays dormant in the cat?

IF a cat previously had the herpes virus but is exhibiting no symptoms now, can it still be passed on to another cat?
I'm not mews, but I do have a herpes kitty. The herpes virus lives in a kitty's brain. It does not ever go away. It can go dormant by controlling the cat's environment, boosting nutrition, and keeping stressors to a minimum, but all you ever really do is treat the symptoms and any secondary infections when the kitty has a flare up.

There is no such thing as previously having the herpes virus. Once a cat has it, it always has it. I'm not sure about passing it around. My older cat doesn't have it and has never had it. My younger cat does, and hasn't passed it to the older cat.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephanietx View Post
There is no such thing as previously having the herpes virus. Once a cat has it, it always has it. I'm not sure about passing it around. My older cat doesn't have it and has never had it. My younger cat does, and hasn't passed it to the older cat.
I just spoke with a vet assistant and yes, it's true that it never goes away; only the symptoms can be controlled in a healthy environment.

And yes, she said that it definitely can be transmitted to other cats even if the symptoms are not there, it's always a risk.

I ask because my foster cat has the herpes virus and I myself have a healthy cat. This worries me...
post #14 of 15
I think there's a vaccine for it, IIRC. Ask your vet. I do know that it's most commonly transmitted to younger kitties and older cats, if they've never shown the symptoms most likely won't get it. Again, though, don't trust my brain. Ask your vet.
post #15 of 15
7-14 days is average for an URI, but it is frequently a chronic condition. Most times it is actually caused by a herpes virus and can be brought on by cat to cat contact, or even stress. In most cases it is contracted in a shelter environment, and will cease to be a problem after the kitty is in their new home for a while. In chronic cases if will come back from time to time, but can usually be controlled well.

You should be more concerned if your kitty becomes lethargic, has a loss of appetite, becomes dehydrated, or if symptoms last longer than 21 days on antibiotics.

In addition to the antibiotics, ask your vet about giving L-lysine. Working in shelters where URI's were pretty much a 365 day a year problem, we gave L-lysine to the cats with a long lasting URI or those with chronic outbreaks. It's a nutritional supplement that is known to lessen the length and severity of symptoms.
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