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Declawing big cats?!

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
There is a man up in the north island of NZ - he owns a wildlife park and has a tv show - today I learned that he has had his licence revoked because of unsanitary conditions and declawing 30 big cats. I was so upset when I saw that on the news. It is bad enough declawing housecats, but big cats!

I am so glad that the MAF stepped in and resolved the issue that the big cats won't be euthanised, and an experienced former zookeeper is taking over.

I really hope that those big cats will be okay.

http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/1318360/2304830
post #2 of 28
I don't agree with declawing cats of any size, but I don't think it's that uncommon for big cat owners to declaw.
post #3 of 28
with Big cat s it is a true Human Safety issue ... Not something I like but I see the reasoning and would rather have a declawed big cat than and extinct species
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
with Big cat s it is a true Human Safety issue ... Not something I like but I see the reasoning and would rather have a declawed big cat than and extinct species
You hit the nail right on the head Jen. Another important factor is also the method that is used to declaw the cat. If the cat is declawed by a knowledgable vetrinarian who specializes in laser declaw then that is much prefered over the traditional clipper methods. If laser declaws are done by inexperienced vets who are not knowledgable on the procedures involved then it can cause burns to the tissue, so that's why it's important to make sure the vet is well skilled. When the laser is used the nail and the distal phalanx are the only things removed from the cat. When the older methods are used, many times the middle bone gets crushed in the process of the amputation and that can caused chipped bone fragments and result in deformed nail regrowth.

Yes, it is true that the distal phalanx in a cat is the equivilant of the last part of our fingers if you want a comparison, HOWEVER it is also the equivilant to a horse's hoof....so you really can not compare the anatomy of the 3!
The distal phalanx of a cat is used only to house the nail so to speak, it functions like a nail bed. The way that it sits in the cat's paw, it has no effect on walking patterns or gait because cats do not walk on that part of their paw they walk on the middle bone (which is the one that can be crushed or damaged by traditional declaw methods) So when one declaws a cat with outdated methods, then yes it can be cruel because it effects their gait and can result in spinal arthritis should the middle bone be damaged in any way....HOWEVER when a laser declaw is done on the cat it is not so bad simply because that bone is never touched. All a laser declaw entails is seperating the nail & dystal phalanx from the ligamets that attach it. The laser immediately cauterizes and steralizes the ligaments after the nail & phalanx are removed so as a result you do not have excessive bleeding (there's actually virtually no blood loss), you also do not have bruising or a chance for bone fragments being left behind because the laser never touches the bone. The distal phalanx only serves to house the cat's nail- cats walk with their claws retracted (the exception to this in big cats would be cheetahs) so even if you remove their claw and distal phalanx through laser declaw it has no ill effect on their walking pattern because they do not naturally walk on that part of the paw. There is a big misconception about declawing and many people villianize it because they simply do not understand the techniques or anatomy. Sometimes depending on the situation and circumstances, declawing can be necessary, and when it is if it is done by a knowledgable vet and even better, with a laser then the chances for recover are much better and pain is greatly reduced...not to mention the recovery time is very fast. Also another thing to consider with laser declaws vs. traditional methods- there is normally not a need for bandaging and stitches afterwards....all that is needed is a simple line of surgical glue. With traditional methods bandaging is needed and it can result in added pressure on the surgical area which makes it more sensitive, bruised, and painful....if the declaw is done with a laser, you eliminate all of that which is better all the way around.

I understand that TCS is against declawing however I do think it is important for people to be informed so that they understand the different methods and how they work. Sometimes it is a necessary evil.
post #5 of 28
I'm sure AmberTheBobcat will come in and give us a perspective on why Big Cats are declawed.

I know it may seem inhumane to do it, but I wouldn't want to be on the business end of a Cougar making biscuits on my leg. That's just me.
post #6 of 28
All my domestics have their claws. However, my Bobcats are declawed on the front and our cougar on all 4. The main reason is this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
with Big cat s it is a true Human Safety issue ...
There is also the issue of vet care and their safety, that is the #1 reason why I did, not for my safety. I could handle my cougar with his claws and same with my bobcats, but if a vet would refuse to care for them, what do you do? Our vet uses laser and I should note, none of my cats have ever showed any signs of distress. The only time Carmelo did, was when I accidentally stepped on his front paw We were playing when this happened. He shook his paw, licked the toes for a bit, then we continued playing. I will be getting Bobcat #4 soon, a rescue and she is not declawed. I am not sure if I will declaw her though. I believe she is around 6 months of age and her claws are getting a bit large.
post #7 of 28
Read the article...this line somewhat confused me:
"Declawing cats is a controversial issue and is banned in the United States with many saying it's a cruel and unnecessary procedure."

Maybe the mean "declawing big cats" is illeagle? I think that is the case in the USA.

I thought that declawing cats in England was illeagle...so I assumed that Australia might have made it illeagle as well (housecats I mean)...so I'd assume that this would apply to big cats as well...if that was the case.

I understand how some here can feel that the declawing lessens the danger w/ a big cat...but really, they don't need the claws to hurt you.... just the force/weight...and of course the biting issue... would be more than enough.

In most traditional zoos, they try to limit human/animal contact as much as possible, so a big cat having it's claws or not wouldn't matter as it should never come in contact with people (unless, for instance, it escapes). Now, if what they say in the article is true about this place not having proper training for it's staff, inadaquate barriers, etc...it may be that they were handling the animals in such a way (i.e. interacting with them lots in pen, etc.) that they felt safer with them declawed. I believe there is a zoo in the US that practices a LOT of trainer-cat interaction but they do not declaw.

IMO, if a zoo is perporting (I think that's the right word) to be a conservation center, they should keep the animals in as close to a "wild" state as possible, habitat, food, and claws, etc. The interests of the animals should come first... It seems that in this case, with the sanitation conditions, crowding, and declawing, that was not the case.

As for private owners of exotic cats....I think they should keep them claws and all...if you really want a wild cat, you should accept all the risks inherrant with owning such a creature.

Now, declawing for medical reasons is a completely different issue all together IMO.

Please note, I'm not saying it is evil to declaw (domestic or wild cat) but should be a "last resort" for medical or extreme behavioral (in the case of domestics) issues.

Art
post #8 of 28
Declawing IS illegal in Australia (and New Zealand where this story is), but I think it's more commonly accepted for the big cats for the reasons mentioned above.

I think it feels like a double standard to say it's cruel and horrible for domestics, but ok for big cats, but I understand why it must be done for the big cats (as opposed to domestic cats where it's done because the owners just couldn't be bothered dealing with it).

I think the case is concentrating more on the conditions that then declawing - the fact that there were 7 lions to a cage meant for 2!
post #9 of 28
I feel sorry for those big cats. Would that they could roam free and clawed in their natural environment.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
I feel sorry for those big cats. Would that they could roam free and clawed in their natural environment.
Big cats live very happy lives in captivity, when cared for properly. Just look at the happy faces on my big cats However it appears in this case they were not. Natural environment?? There is not much of that left any more.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberThe Bobcat View Post
Big cats live very happy lives in captivity, when cared for properly. Just look at the happy faces on my big cats ..... Natural environment?? There is not much of that left any more.
No, there's not. And thus the problem. But I don't think even you can say that captivity would be a preferred way of life for even your cats, IF there was proper environment and range for them to live a natural life in the wild. If they preferred captivity, we wouldn't need to keep them captive, now would we?
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
No, there's not. And thus the problem. But I don't think even you can say that captivity would be a preferred way of life for even your cats, IF there was proper environment and range for them to live a natural life in the wild. If they preferred captivity, we wouldn't need to keep them captive, now would we?
Wow, Tim. Do we really want to go there? I mean, sometimes Oliver darts for the door.
post #13 of 28
I think declawing big cats (even in zoos) is a good idea as long as they use the laser method. My cats all have their claws mainly because I'm afraid if they DO get outside they will need something to protect themselves from the barn cats. I would be terrified if a zoo cat got outside and had their claws, on top of their weight, size and teeth.

And, even in a zoo, big cats still have handlers, still have to see the vet, etc. They aren't in a "petting" zoo, but they still have frequent human contact.
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
Wow, Tim. Do we really want to go there?
No, we don't. We do what we can with what we've been given. I'm sure the same applies to animals. I'd rather be on a yacht anchored off a beach in the Leeward Islands. Does that mean I'm unhappy in Wisconsin? No. Does that mean I'd be happier on the yacht? Of course. Is it possible for me to be on the yacht? No, of course not. So, draw your own analogies.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
But I don't think even you can say that captivity would be a preferred way of life for even your cats, IF there was proper environment and range for them to live a natural life in the wild. If they preferred captivity, we wouldn't need to keep them captive, now would we?
Tim, YES I can say that. For one, my cats were not taken from the wild to live in captivity. They were born and raised in captivity. Yes at one point their ancestors were taken out of the wild to breed in a captive environment. Now if given a choice, if I captured a "wild" bobcat and brought it inside in a captive environment, this cat would prefer to be back in the wild, because that is all it knows and a captive environment would be very foreign to them. However, the opposite is true for my "wild" cats born and raised in captivity. Yes, they enjoy going outside, but living in the wild is foreign to them. For instance, back in September when Amber got out during the time we were experiencing the remnants of hurricane Ike, she was on the loose for 34 hours. But in the end, she returned home on her own and was found waiting near the door of the enclosure wanting to come inside. Sadly, until you have experienced the love these animals can share with humans, you will never understand. To share the love of a bobcat, puma or any other captive wild cat, is a love that most people will never be able to show to one another. If these cats did not enjoy their captive life, they would not show this kind of affection to me. They don't even show that type of affection to one another in the wild. They don't live a social life in the wild, but enjoy it in captivity. It's funny how some seem think it isn't ok for me to keep "wild" cats as pets, but they have no problem keeping their own cats captive do they
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberThe Bobcat View Post
Tim, YES I can say that. For one, my cats were not taken from the wild to live in captivity. They were born and raised in captivity. Yes at one point their ancestors were taken out of the wild to breed in a captive environment. Now if given a choice, if I captured a "wild" bobcat and brought it inside in a captive environment, this cat would prefer to be back in the wild, because that is all it knows and a captive environment would be very foreign to them. However, the opposite is true for my "wild" cats born and raised in captivity. Yes, they enjoy going outside, but living in the wild is foreign to them. For instance, back in September when Amber got out during the time we were experiencing the remnants of hurricane Ike, she was on the loose for 34 hours. But in the end, she returned home on her own and was found waiting near the door of the enclosure wanting to come inside. It's funny how some seem think it isn't ok for me to keep "wild" cats as pets, but they have no problem keeping their own cats captive do they
that is a great story

well also should remember at some point housecats were also "wild"
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
well also should remember at some point housecats were also "wild"
Yes they were, wild cats that chose to live amongst humans
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
But I don't think even you can say that captivity would be a preferred way of life for even your cats, IF there was proper environment and range for them to live a natural life in the wild. If they preferred captivity, we wouldn't need to keep them captive, now would we?
I don't agree. I do think the big cats would prefer to be with their humans over a natural wild life.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberThe Bobcat View Post
Tim, YES I can say that. For one, my cats were not taken from the wild to live in captivity. They were born and raised in captivity. Yes at one point their ancestors were taken out of the wild to breed in a captive environment. Now if given a choice, if I captured a "wild" bobcat and brought it inside in a captive environment, this cat would prefer to be back in the wild, because that is all it knows and a captive environment would be very foreign to them. However, the opposite is true for my "wild" cats born and raised in captivity. Yes, they enjoy going outside, but living in the wild is foreign to them. For instance, back in September when Amber got out during the time we were experiencing the remnants of hurricane Ike, she was on the loose for 34 hours. But in the end, she returned home on her own and was found waiting near the door of the enclosure wanting to come inside. Sadly, until you have experienced the love these animals can share with humans, you will never understand. To share the love of a bobcat, puma or any other captive wild cat, is a love that most people will never be able to show to one another. If these cats did not enjoy their captive life, they would not show this kind of affection to me. They don't even show that type of affection to one another in the wild. They don't live a social life in the wild, but enjoy it in captivity. It's funny how some seem think it isn't ok for me to keep "wild" cats as pets, but they have no problem keeping their own cats captive do they
I love your big cats. I would have one in a heartbeat if I was healthier.
Because of human encroachment loads of animals need to be homed in sanctuaries or habitats. I have visited a polar bear habitat in Canada where the bears were all rescues from private ownership or from lack of food due climate changes.
I saw a story of a man who had a lion as a pet. The photos were so cute. You could even see the lion smile.

Anytime you can put up some new photos I would love to see.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberThe Bobcat View Post
Sadly, until you have experienced the love these animals can share with humans, you will never understand. To share the love of a bobcat, puma or any other captive wild cat, is a love that most people will never be able to show to one another.
I've experienced the love of my cats and so I can appreciate that statement, but there's another side to it, and I'm afraid that would lead to an indoor v. outdoor debate Rockcat cautioned my against. But I'm going to say it now anyway, because it addresses the other side of Amber's comments:

Sadly, until you've experienced a cat's joy of being free outdoors, you will never understand. To see a cat's reaction on going outdoors is a reaction that many cat owners have never seen or really appreciated. I've experienced those reactions and I firmly believe that the call to the wild is still alive and well in the hearts and minds of our captive animals. Not all will have this call awakened upon going outdoors. If they've been inside since birth, that's the only life they've even known and that's the life they're happy with. But I've seen written time and time again in this forum and others that once a cat goes outside, it's very difficult to keep them inside, and these people constantly struggle with cats darting through open doors and crying to be let out.

I'll say it again for emphasis: I firmly believe that the call to the wild is still alive and well in the hearts and minds of our captive animals and that goes for Amber's big cats as well as our domestic cats.

It's just difficult for me to describe the change I see in Rocket when he goes from inside to outside. It's like I'm seeing a completely different cat. He just lights up with joy. He sniffs the air, he rolls on the ground, he runs back and forth. Every fiber of his being vibrates to a new frequency, a frequency he only connects with outside. Yes, that's it....he's connecting with the great outside....the FREE and UNCONFINED outside....he's connecting with his TRUE NATURE. You really should see him run!! He LOVES to run!! He just flies!! Maybe I'm more observant than most people; I think I am; and I KNOW that Rocket is more happy when he can go outdoors. Now, he also appreciates being fed and being sheltered from the elements -- he's no dummy -- so I have no problem getting him to come back in when the weather is crappy, and most of the time at night. But even then, he's often inside only 10 minutes when he wants to go back out again. He desires to be FREE and that means NOT BEING CAPTIVE INDOORS.

Even Twinkie, who really is not at all suited to be an outdoor cat, and I'm sure is quite happy with his indoor life, once got out unrestrained and I saw the miracle transformation in him, too. His whole demeanor change....he just took on a look of alert vibrancy .... he just LIT UP. He took off and was gone across two neighboring yards in no time. I occasionally take him out on leash and harness, and he never WANTS to come back in.

Now, let's just not get into the whole argument about what's BETTER for cats. I don't disagree with the consensus on that. I'm just looking at it from the cat's point of view as to what they feel; and I really don't think any other cats are all that different. Including Amber's big cats. We may justify their captivity because it's better for them -- I know all the arguments and I don't disagree with them. What I don't agree with is that cats (in general) prefer to be indoors and in captivity because they're happier there. I really don't think we can make that conclusion after all, because in truth, most of us haven't allowed our cats the experience of being outdoors and free to come and go at will. And so why haven't we done that, eh? Are we afraid we'll find out they're really not quite to enthralled to be in captivity as we might think they are?

Why do we have all these behavioral problems in cats? All these problems resulting from boredom? From lack of mental and physical stimulation? Why are we always encouraging people to play with their cats? Obviously, it's because they NEED such activities. All we're doing is simulating what they'd be doing outside. We're trying to give them something artificial in place of what their very natures crave and need. For the most part it works, and that just underscores that being indoors is NOT natural for these animals.

To those who make the argument that cats chose to live with us: yes, there's much truth in that. They chose to live in amongst us, but they didn't choose to spend their lives confined in our structures. They chose to live in amongst us because it was a mutually beneficial arrangement. They had food and shelter and enjoyed easy hunting; we gained a natural rodent exterminator and a warm, fuzzy creature that made us feel good. Again: they chose to live with us, but they didn't choose to be confined by us. Again, look at my experience: cats prefer to be free to CHOOSE to come and go; to be inside with us, or to be outside hunting mice and scratching trees and rolling in the grass. They want the FREEDOM choose to do both, as their cat spirit and cat nature leads them.

Just to let you know where I'm coming from, these thoughts and point of view AREN'T my original point of view, they're ones that I've slowly come around to over the last couple of years, based on my own experiences. Before that I was strictly an indoor cat proponent. But that belief was just based on what I learned, and when I experienced something different, my beliefs were called into question. I had to reevaluate my position and ended up taking a different position. I'd be willing to bet 99% of indoor-only people haven't reevaluated their positions. I'd be willing to be that if that had the opportunity to do so, they too might see there's two viable sides to this story. Unfortunately, I'd also say that the majority are not in a position to be able to do so, due to circumstances: living in the city, for example. Sure....being confined indoors....being held captive....is BETTER for a cat, for a big cat, for any animal in danger outdoors, for any animal not able to have access to its own natural habit....sure, it's better for the animal to have life than to be run over by a car or starve to death because all its natural prey are gone. But don't try to sell me on them being HAPPIER.

I hope my tale of my own personal experience and resultant conversion will open a few minds to the possiblity that cats aren't necessarily happier in captivity. They make the best of it and enjoy it, just like we do. I'd rather be on that yacht, but I don't have that choice. I'd be willing to bet that most cats, including Amber's big cats, would prefer having the choice to go outside and be free, because somewhere inside, it's in their very nature to be free.

"Born Free" -- ya, apropo -- I get it, now. Do you?
post #21 of 28
Quote:
I think declawing big cats (even in zoos) is a good idea as long as they use the laser method.
Really? Should they declaw bears as well? Should they remove the trunks from elephants?

This is a picture of a polar bears claws, should he be declawed in a zoo?

http://animalmakers.com/Catalog/imag...ar_2415-01.jpg

Are we detoothing these animals as well? or just sawing their teeth down?

I really can't believe there is an arguement on this. It seems common sense to me.
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breal76 View Post
Really? Should they declaw bears as well? Should they remove the trunks from elephants?

This is a picture of a polar bears claws, should he be declawed in a zoo?

http://animalmakers.com/Catalog/imag...ar_2415-01.jpg

Are we detoothing these animals as well? or just sawing their teeth down?

I really can't believe there is an arguement on this. It seems common sense to me.
I agree. This 'Lion Man' goes to Africa and gets wild cats and brings them back to New Zealand. Recently there was an episode where he went to South Africa to obtain wild cheetahs. Does that make any difference on whether it would be better that they are now in captivity?
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC12 View Post
I love your big cats. I would have one in a heartbeat if I was healthier.
Because of human encroachment loads of animals need to be homed in sanctuaries or habitats. I have visited a polar bear habitat in Canada where the bears were all rescues from private ownership or from lack of food due climate changes.
I saw a story of a man who had a lion as a pet. The photos were so cute. You could even see the lion smile.

Anytime you can put up some new photos I would love to see.
I am sure you did see that lion smile. These cats enjoy their life with their human companions. I have lots of new pictures, but no home computer yet. Haven't gotten around to getting a new one. I spend much of my free time with the cats.
Quote:
Sadly, until you've experienced a cat's joy of being free outdoors, you will never understand. To see a cat's reaction on going outdoors is a reaction that many cat owners have never seen or really appreciated.
I fully understand. They enjoy going outside as much as they enjoy their time inside. My big cats are not kept inside 24 hours a day. Our cougar lives outside all the time, due to his size, you can't keep him inside. Well you can, if you don't mind everything inside your home becoming a big cougar toy Our bobcats spend time inside and outside. For the most part, they are outside during the night in their large enclosure. During the day, they come inside. This is of their own free will. I open the door and they come running full speed to come inside. There are times I leave the door open (when the weather is nice) to let them come and go as they please. (Our back door from the house leads directly into the enclosure) There are times I can not even get them to go out or want to stay out, it depends on their mood, not the weather. Do they prefer to be outside? My answer is no. They like to go out when they choose and they also like to be inside when they so choose. And as stated, when Amber got out, she came home on her own free will and was waiting to come inside. She would have been home sooner, had it not been for the 70+ mph winds we were having. With trees and branches coming down and all types of debris blowing around, she just took shelter somewhere until the winds calmed down and returned home.
Quote:
Are we detoothing these animals as well? or just sawing their teeth down?
My big cats have all their teeth.
Quote:
I agree. This 'Lion Man' goes to Africa and gets wild cats and brings them back to New Zealand. Recently there was an episode where he went to South Africa to obtain wild cheetahs. Does that make any difference on whether it would be better that they are now in captivity?
I am not quite sure what you are asking, but then again it is after 5am and I have been up all night at work.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberThe Bobcat View Post
..... This is of their own free will..... let them come and go as they please.
This, I'm glad to hear. That's sorta one of my points.

Quote:
Do they prefer to be outside? My answer is no. .
Well, but their outside enclosure is nothing like running free in their natural habitat, so that really isn't an answer to the question I posed.

I have no doubt that, being raised with people, and being declawed, your cats are certainly better off where they are now, and there's no way of proving whether they're happier there or in their natural state, because at this point it's impossible to revert to the natural state and find out. So the question is, at best, hypothetical, and, at worst, a trigger for a contentious debate. So, it's best to leave it at the former and just call it a philosophical point of view, not a pragmatic one. If I were in your shoes, no doubt I'd do everything exactly the same, solely because it's the best that can be done in the circumstances. Philosophy is fine for stimulating your mind, but it's pragmatism that gets you through the day.
post #25 of 28
Tim, I'm not going to quote your entire post, but I do see what you're saying. I do let 3 of my cats outside at times...the other 3 (Monster, Corky and Missy) have no desire to brave the great outdoors and are quite content snoozing on the couch. BUT, I think a lot of that depends on where you live. We have 5 acres at the end of a dirt road so traffic isn't an issue, with almost an acre fenced in (the rest is woods) and they mainly stay in the yard tormenting the dogs. When we lived in town, we didn't let the cats out because of traffic and bad neighbors. At that point, Harley didn't know any different (he was bottle fed and doesn't remember outside) but Little One was a barn kitten we got at 5 months old so she DID remember and didn't like it too much. But it was for her own safety.

On nice days I definitely can see how much my cats enjoy being out for a bit. But, yesterday it was raining and Harley insisted on going out (he's taken after the dogs and starts to scratch on the door to go out ). He was out for a total of 45 seconds before he was scratching to be let back in again. Yeah, I just stood at the door an waited because I knew he would change his mind pretty quick. But, those three have their choice. The other three (as I said) have no interest what so ever.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
I've experienced the love of my cats and so I can appreciate that statement, but there's another side to it, and I'm afraid that would lead to an indoor v. outdoor debate Rockcat cautioned my against. But I'm going to say it now anyway, because it addresses the other side of Amber's comments...
Well, thank you for addressing it. I have to say I agree with you.

Geisha is a beautiful calico cat who moved into our back yard awhile back. She is obviously a very happy cat. She runs to the car when I pull in after work. She loves to be petted and hang around with us when we are outside. She sleeps on our porch and is there every morning for breakfast. She runs up trees and chases butterflies. She rolls in the dirt and finds a sun spot to relax in. She acts like the roof next to our porch is her personal veranda. I am concerned for her safety, but I just know that a life indoors would be boring and depressing to her.

Oliver and Tripod are indoor-only cats.

Oliver occasionally tries to get out and I panic every time. When I lived in a house that had an outdoor screened in area, he was allowed to go out there. I also used to take him out on a leash. I had to stop doing that because it caused him to try to get out every time someone went in or out. We live in an apartment now so he can't even go out to the screened area. I feel bad for him, but he seems content most of the time. He and Tripod play a lot and he gets plenty of attention, but I see that he misses the outdoors.

Tripod was found at my work years ago. He was a starving, filthy little kitten with 3 legs and only one "normal" foot. He must have had such a hard life early on that he has no desire what-so-ever to go outside. He loves indoor life. He doesn't even go near the door.

So, I guess it depends on the cat.
post #27 of 28
When Eileen rescued Xander he had been living on the street for who knows how long. He shows no interest in going outside, ever. He seems to be completely happy and grateful for a warm, loving indoor home. I wouldn't say he is missing out on anything at all by not going outside anymore. He has no interest in it.
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlleyGirl View Post
When Eileen rescued Xander he had been living on the street for who knows how long. He shows no interest in going outside, ever. He seems to be completely happy and grateful for a warm, loving indoor home. I wouldn't say he is missing out on anything at all by not going outside anymore. He has no interest in it.
He was probably half-starved, cold, and scared out of his wits for too long, and is afraid of losing a good thing. That happens. My mom has a really old Schnauzer mix who spent over a decade outside (and suffered frostbite). He loves being an inside dog so much that he runs outside to do his "business", and comes right back in, even if the weather is terrific. He's so appreciative of a soft sofa or lap and personal attention that it's heartbreaking to think of his former life.
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