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post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breal76 View Post
I was just at the book store and according to this book they say a person who is 5 foot should weigh 95 pounds.

A person who is 5 foot 4" should weigh 111 pounds.

Well I am 5 foot 2' and have weighed 102 pounds and my body was gross skinny. I could see the ribs in my chest. GROSS!

They did say there was a variable and far as body type but to put that out there is irresponsible.

I put the book down.

You know what the secret to living healthy is? Being smart about what you put in your mouth and exercising. No one needs a book for that if you have common sense.
I have to agree with you as well. I'm 5' 2" and was 104 pounds most of my life (before daughter) but I was also very active, played ball, skated, danced, etc. so I was well toned and muscle does weigh more. Each time I donated blood they would ask me if I was sure I was over 100 lbs. Since pregnancy and childbirth I am more like 120 but still wearing some of those clothes I bought before I was pregnant (yes 28 years old but good quality, i.e., not from discount stores).

If I had read those things in that book I would have put it down too - very unrealistic in those terms at least.

Good nutrition and physical activity contribute more than most people would believe IMO.
post #32 of 59
That book is all about the evils of eating meat and processed foods, etc.
They push an all fruit and vegetable diet. And non-processed foods.
I haven't read it myself but my brother and SIL are into it big time.
They say if you read it your meat eating days will be numbered.
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
That book is all about the evils of eating meat and processed foods, etc.
They push an all fruit and vegetable diet. And non-processed foods.
I haven't read it myself but my brother and SIL are into it big time.
They say if you read it your meat eating days will be numbered.
Well there are 2 good reasons for me not to buy into it.
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Well there are 2 good reasons for me not to buy into it.
lol...

Quote:
have to agree with you as well. I'm 5' 2" and was 104 pounds most of my life (before daughter) but I was also very active, played ball, skated, danced, etc. so I was well toned and muscle does weigh more. Each time I donated blood they would ask me if I was sure I was over 100 lbs.
I can relate. Before I hit 22 I was about 90lbs at my height. Just genetics of course, but people stopped me all the time to tell me I could get help for being an anerexic. I was so happy when I finally reached 105 pounds! And even better when I hit 115. I had boobs and a butt! Hurray!
post #35 of 59
If they're going to tax smokers and overweight people, then they should also tax alcoholics then, or anyone who drinks regularly. Oh, and anyone who eats fast food, twinkies, etc. Where does it end?
post #36 of 59
My lowest body weight after I was fully grown was 120 lbs and I'm 5'2". I was THIN for my size. I was a size 6, but I have hips and a chest, big time (been a D cup since I was 17). If it wasn't for my hips, I could have fit into a 4.

I think I LOOK my best when I'm around 130-135 lbs, but still considered at the high end of normal for my height. I'm much heavier than that now, but considering I'm getting my hypothyroidism under control, the weight is slowly coming off. I hope to get down to 145-150 in the next couple of months, then figure out where to go from there.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlleyGirl View Post
If they're going to tax smokers and overweight people, then they should also tax alcoholics then, or anyone who drinks regularly. Oh, and anyone who eats fast food, twinkies, etc. Where does it end?
Smokers are already taxed to the hilt. Alcohol is taxed to the hilt.

The only thing left to tax are the fast foods and twinkies - I say go for it!
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Smokers are already taxed to the hilt. Alcohol is taxed to the hilt.

The only thing left to tax are the fast foods and twinkies - I say go for it!
I guess that's the difference though...instead of taxing (or raising the health insurance costs for the person) the person, tax the goods that are known to CAUSE the obesity.

Then again, I do cake decorating on the side and would have to figure something out if anything with trans fat is taxed. Most of the BEST scratch-icing recipes do better (i.e., smoother, easier to decorate with...not necessarily taste) when trans fats are included.
post #39 of 59
That is a good idea, put a 40% tax on ALL processed foods. With half the money going to the treatment of medical conditions caused by voluntary, inappropriate behavior or something. And 40% tax on all fast food restaurant
purchases also. With part of the money also going to Obama global poverty plan. Feed third world countries with the tax collected by the American's poor eating habits. That would be so appropriate. People would hate the tax but they don't have to pay it if they are eating appropriately. And if they do have to pay it if they decide the processed and fast food are more important than the tax, then the money will be going to a worthy cause.
Win Win IMO.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky View Post
I guess that's the difference though...instead of taxing (or raising the health insurance costs for the person) the person, tax the goods that are known to CAUSE the obesity.

Then again, I do cake decorating on the side and would have to figure something out if anything with trans fat is taxed. Most of the BEST scratch-icing recipes do better (i.e., smoother, easier to decorate with...not necessarily taste) when trans fats are included.
Just a bit off-topic here, but our bakeries no longer do butter-cream icing which is my all-time favourite. Instead they make their icings from a pre-prepared powder with preservatives and only God knows what else in it. How is that better for anyone than a plain old butter-cream icing?

If people ate good food and in moderation, I honestly don't believe there would be the obesity problem we have today. Most certainly if I packed away cookies, cakes, sweets of any kind every day along with pre-packaged, over-processed foods with other stuff added to make then taste OK after they take out the good stuff with the processing, I'd take bets that even with my good heredity I would gain weight.

Yes, some people have thyroid problems (this can be adjusted with medication) but I honestly believe that a lot of our obesity problems lie in what we eat and our lack of physical movement/exercise.
post #41 of 59
Hmm...This WOULD be MY state lol. Apparently they aren't advertising it here much as I haven't heard about it locally. I think AL does have one of the highest obesity rates in the country...Hmm...must be all that fried chicken and the fact that it gets really hot and humid here in the summer/spring discouraging outdoor activity.

IMO, I think that this should be up to the insurance company...IF it is not medically caused, the company can decide to increase rates... I think the same for smokers...the company should be able to increase rates to cover highly probably instances of cancer, etc.

The taxation of junk food is a seperate issue...taxing fast food more? sure, why not? taxing "processed" foods more? That would be almost 75 - 80% of foods in the grocery store...so everyone's cost of food would go up.

Art
post #42 of 59
Yes, everyone's food would go up. Maybe people would start growing their own vegetables and eating better. Maybe buying local home grown foods.

I sincerely believe that all the processed foods we eat are giving us cancer.

Everyone is in agreement with hefty taxes on cigarettes and alcohol, why not processed foods?
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky View Post
My lowest body weight after I was fully grown was 120 lbs and I'm 5'2". I was THIN for my size. I was a size 6, but I have hips and a chest, big time (been a D cup since I was 17). If it wasn't for my hips, I could have fit into a 4.

I think I LOOK my best when I'm around 130-135 lbs, but still considered at the high end of normal for my height. I'm much heavier than that now, but considering I'm getting my hypothyroidism under control, the weight is slowly coming off. I hope to get down to 145-150 in the next couple of months, then figure out where to go from there.
I'm the same way I averaged around a size 8 for a number of years, but only because my chest was (and still is) larger than average... I'm not gonna squeeze my boobs into a smaller size, it ain't gonna happen. I'm around 160 now, but I was at my best at 125-130. I'm not trying to get to the ideal in many books which is around 105-110. I will look anorexic at that, and I'm the same height as you.

I maxxed out at 175 a few years ago... I hated myself. I still don't like how I look, but it's getting better. I try to watch what I eat and listen to my body. If it doesn't want more, then I don't eat full meals at that point. A snack of popcorn, or lowfat string cheese (if I have it, I like Trader Joe's brand).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
If people ate good food and in moderation, I honestly don't believe there would be the obesity problem we have today. Most certainly if I packed away cookies, cakes, sweets of any kind every day along with pre-packaged, over-processed foods with other stuff added to make then taste OK after they take out the good stuff with the processing, I'd take bets that even with my good heredity I would gain weight.
I know I could be better with my exercise routine. I have a physical job where I'm standing all day and lifting things and doing a lot of moving, as compared to those in office jobs. I work retail and we all bust our bee-hinds in our store. By the time i get home, I'm too dam*** tired to work out. I'd love it, but once my health is back up to normal (I am recovering from a nasty case of Cellulitis) I'll be going back to the gym, but only on my days off... when my feet are screaming at me to sit down, the last thing I want or need to do is get on a treadmill.

A side note (which is what prompted me to get in here and post): I was just at the grocery store a half hour ago. I decided I wanted sandwich makings. I got my bread (low sodium wheat), and cheese (full fat, thank you... fine in moderation, just like my milk: low fat is nasty). an looked at the meat. Now, something I've become aware of is the HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup) issue. The Corn industry (or whomever governs them) has started producing TV ads here... about how HFCS is okay in moderation... one problem with that: it's in EVERYTHING. LIke most of the lunch meats. Holy cr**. It's in the bologna and other meats by a major name lunch meat company. It's in every baby formula out there today (I know this because my best friends' son has issues with it and I looked at them all myself). How can we consume HFCS in moderation if it's in everything? Simple: read the labels and minimize what you buy with it. Yes, I just answered my own question... but seriously, in every baby formula on the shelf??? He's allergic to dairy and soy (becoming more common now, but he'll grow out of it), and highly allergic to peanuts (won't grow out of, unfortunately). He's now eating solids, but still takes a bottle at night (they're trying to wean him off it it, the hospital formula they order is expensive and their money is tight). They need to find alternatives... oh I dunno... use real sugar... also in moderation? HFCS is considered the sweetener... Sorry, this is an issue that rings a little close to home for me...

I ended up finding lunch meats that didn't have it. I was at Safeway and chose ham and pastrami from their Eating Right line, which is all healthy 'no additives' food. I had no idea until today that HFCS was in the lunch meats. Blech. Another reason to go organic...

Rant about HFCS over...

To keep this post about the Original Topic: I kinda like the idea of a fat tax, but think they need to make health clubs and visits to dietitians free or low-cost to all, and give education classes on eating and cooking right. I saw a lady once, morbidly obese, in an electric shopping cart (the ones where you sit), loading "Hungry Man" sized microwave dinners by the pile onto the check out belt. I felt kinda sad... she had no fresh veggies or anything... and I'm sure she must have had some other cooking appliance than the microwave. Maybe she didn't know how to cook... but in a case like that, a class on nutrition and basic cooking *available for free to her* would probably help immensely. If you have a puppy (just an example), you train them by positive reinforcement... by giving adults opportunities to learn good habits, you help them feel better, maybe lose weight, get on the right track.

Okay, I'm gonna go clean now... it's my day off...

Amanda
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Smokers are already taxed to the hilt. Alcohol is taxed to the hilt.

The only thing left to tax are the fast foods and twinkies - I say go for it!
Couldn't agree more!
post #45 of 59
Alright then, problem magically solved once the tax is in effect huh? Tax people who don't exercise, check gym memberships and attendance and check on if they are biking or walking or jogging or swimming, etc. Tax those who won't/don't eat right or have no idea what really eating right means. It isn't as easy as one might think, you need to become savvy to read labels and rise about the constant bombarment of advertising and clever marketing and inferior products filled with hidden artificial this and that and corn syrup, and other unnesscary crap. I spend a lot of time educating others in my line of work about the products they mindlessly buy, thinking they are good for them, but they couldn't be more wrong.

Tax those who have genetic problems, and who might have a bigger build and be classified as overweight, when really they are not, but if you just looked at one number, they would be. Tax those with mental problems that make it even harder for them to do what they are "suppose to do" so they don't get fat.

Only look at one number, then tax 'em huh?

No matter if some have better metabolisms and only have to exercise 5 minutes a month, or if some to have the same body weight have to exercise 45 minutes 6 days a week. They must be better than the fat and do what they have to do. Some must keep themselves very hungry at all times to avoid the tax, constantly feel their tummy rumble, as some people maybe don't have the energy to exercise as much as they need to, even on a great diet. Do you know how many people have energy problems that can be closely linked to health problems, for instance chronic fatigue syndrome, or cancer, or other problems. Exercise is so healthy and good and gives normal people more energy, but for many it can be such a struggle and difficult to find enjoyable things. Or maybe they have a physical condition which prohibits exercise? For many, eating better isn't an instant fix either as they tend to overeat whatever they eat to feel full. Those types must measure everything out. Women lose at this as they are genetically prone to gain and keep weight more than men.

I have the body type where I MUST exercise several times a week to keep in shape, even though my diet is perfect and has been for years, I am very healthy and don't overeat. I am female, my body gets all it can out of every calorie. Which was cool back 100's of years ago when food wasn't in abundance and we didn't have to work insanely long hours just to sleep in a house at night and didn't have to drive to get to where we needed to go and we nursed children and lived through very hard cold times, and worked for our food, worked to grow, hunt, and prepare it, exercise was built into our day, instead of something we had to work hard and deliberately to build in weekly. Now it is just annoying, getting the max of out every calorie My husband and my dad have always been skinny and healthy, regardless of diet or exercise. Lucky them!

We tax smokers, we tax alcohol. Bottom line, taxing it doesn't fix the problem. There is no quick fix for such problems.

Obesity is far more complex than just eating and not exercising enough. Sure, losing weight is an easy formula for most, eat less bad food, eat less period, move more. But once again, the poor would be taxed as they have less access to health care, safe places to exercise, and availability of fresh whole foods, or the means to store those foods and education or means/pans and/or grill, oven, etc. to prepare the foods. Most of the crappy food also costs less unless you are really food savvy and know how to make eating healthy work on a budget. It isn't easy. And what about those who are house bound and/or can't make it to a decent grocery store. For some, it is a real problem.

Did anyone catch the recent article, in TIME, talking about how complex obesity is and how your race, economic status, and other important demographics like where you live come into play?
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Susan, I believe wholeheartedly with you. If they want to tax anyone, they should be taxing the heck out of the companies that are putting all the over-processed foods, junk foods, unhealthy additives in our foods and so on. If they taxed these companies enough to affect their profits, the government would get a really good chunk of change and the companies would be forced to provide a healthier product or go out of business.

.
Yes! I agree with this very much!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
If people ate good food and in moderation, I honestly don't believe there would be the obesity problem we have today. I honestly believe that a lot of our obesity problems lie in what we eat and our lack of physical movement/exercise.
Agree too! While I agree with your definition of good food (whole real foods!), however, many people don't understand what that means, they let clever marketing tell them what is good and bad
post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
That is a good idea, put a 40% tax on ALL processed foods. With half the money going to the treatment of medical conditions caused by voluntary, inappropriate behavior or something. And 40% tax on all fast food restaurant
purchases also. With part of the money also going to Obama global poverty plan. Feed third world countries with the tax collected by the American's poor eating habits. That would be so appropriate. People would hate the tax but they don't have to pay it if they are eating appropriately. And if they do have to pay it if they decide the processed and fast food are more important than the tax, then the money will be going to a worthy cause.
Win Win IMO.
Ok, 40% tax on all processed foods and on fast food. So, food that is already expensive will go up and people will have to buy real food or grow it themselves. So, what about all the people that work at the processed food plants that get laid off because there isn't enough income coming in. Or the owners of fast food franchised that have to close their restaurants and claim bankruptcy because they aren't bringing enough in, not to mention all the people that will get laid off from those places too. So the unemployement rate will sky rocket, which is just great for the economy.

People who live in the city in apartments normally don't have land to grow food on. There's only so much you can grow on a patio garden, if they're lucky enough to have a patio. And if they happen to be one of the poor people that had to get laid off because of the food tax, they don't have the money to buy "good" food. So, what do they eat? How do they pay their rent?

It's a nice idea but I don't see how that can work at least not at that rate increase.
post #48 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
Come on now, we already exempted obese people that are obese due to medical problems, so that takes the anorexic thing off the table.

Genetic diseases are not a voluntary choice and cancer isn't either.

Overall I think we can all admit it is much more medically unhealthy to be obese than it is to be skinny.

I have noticed that this thread has made many posters very defensive.

I definitely need to exercise more, I am including myself in all my posts.
Im not really defensive or angry I just don't find it fair. And how would we determine obesity due to medical issues. I mean really how do we know that people are more likely to be obese due to genetics. The reason I give the example of tax people or make them pay more for company health insurance is what I meant that have diseases is because if they start to do it to obese people and smokers whats next.

I don't believe for one second that all obese people are more unhealthy then all skinny people. I would say that more are unhealthy but certainly not all.
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by calico2222 View Post
Ok, 40% tax on all processed foods and on fast food. So, food that is already expensive will go up and people will have to buy real food or grow it themselves.
not to mention, the cheapest foods are the most fattening ones - that's why poorer people are often quite overweight. i've always noticed an increase in my grocery bill when i went on diets that emphasized fruits & vegetables...
post #50 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
That is a good idea, put a 40% tax on ALL processed foods. With half the money going to the treatment of medical conditions caused by voluntary, inappropriate behavior or something. And 40% tax on all fast food restaurant
purchases also. With part of the money also going to Obama global poverty plan. Feed third world countries with the tax collected by the American's poor eating habits. That would be so appropriate. People would hate the tax but they don't have to pay it if they are eating appropriately. And if they do have to pay it if they decide the processed and fast food are more important than the tax, then the money will be going to a worthy cause.
Win Win IMO.
Yes thats what I was trying to say. 40% is a little high I think but good Idea non the less. I think if they put a higher tax on junk food and some how used that to help make healthy food cheaper. I don't know if that is even possible though.
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Yes, some people have thyroid problems (this can be adjusted with medication) but I honestly believe that a lot of our obesity problems lie in what we eat and our lack of physical movement/exercise.
I just wanted to touch on the thyroid thing...SOME people do well on "mainstream" medication for hypothyroidism. I was not. I went to a specialist and only until he put me on additional medication that isn't considered mainstream, did I notice my symptoms going away.

Most doctors will look at the test results and ignore the fact that all your symptoms still exist. That was me. So, unless someone is willing to fight for their doctor to treat their symptoms, the mainstream treatment might not be enough. Just because one blood test says you're normal, it doesn't negate the symptoms.
post #52 of 59
After reading some of your posts, I feel I have to apologize for some of my comments. In my mind, it was a cut and dried, simple solution but after reading some of your posts, I realize it is a much more complex issue and that there is no quick, easy fix. My comment about medications for thyroid was ignorant on my part. As the above poster says, not all medications work for everyone.

I do maintain, however, that we all need to learn to eat healthier, complain or boycott or whatever it takes to get some of the preservatives and over-processing out of our foods. The manufacturers that are making the profits are not about to volunteer to do those things, so it's up to the public to initiate change.
post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
That is a good idea, put a 40% tax on ALL processed foods. With half the money going to the treatment of medical conditions caused by voluntary, inappropriate behavior or something. And 40% tax on all fast food restaurant
purchases also. With part of the money also going to Obama global poverty plan. Feed third world countries with the tax collected by the American's poor eating habits. That would be so appropriate. People would hate the tax but they don't have to pay it if they are eating appropriately. And if they do have to pay it if they decide the processed and fast food are more important than the tax, then the money will be going to a worthy cause.
Win Win IMO.
So "more government" is ok in this case?
post #54 of 59
I eat all organic or sustainable foods. It is easy to get here in Oregon. It is easy to eat out and get pure foods. We even have a fast food place that uses local ingredients including all natural meat and seasonal fruits.
I don't have any food in my cupboard except for dried herbs, whole grains, spices, sugars and vinegars. I use only fresh pasta even.
I use whole butter or olive oil butter since daughter is allergic.
I use good fats for my food and make healthy choices. Good seasonal produce is when it is best anyway. I do not buy stuff shipped in from other countries out of season. You can eat healthy and cheaply if you are smart about it.

What I think is that all that junk in food has caused hormonal and endocrine issues causing weight problems.


Starting soon our restaurants are going to have provide nutritional info on the menu.
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC12 View Post
I eat all organic or sustainable foods. It is easy to get here in Oregon. It is easy to eat out and get pure foods. We even have a fast food place that uses local ingredients including all natural meat and seasonal fruits.
I don't have any food in my cupboard except for dried herbs, whole grains, spices, sugars and vinegars. I use only fresh pasta even.
I use whole butter or olive oil butter since daughter is allergic.
I use good fats for my food and make healthy choices. Good seasonal produce is when it is best anyway. I do not buy stuff shipped in from other countries out of season. You can eat healthy and cheaply if you are smart about it.

What I think is that all that junk in food has caused hormonal and endocrine issues causing weight problems.


Starting soon our restaurants are going to have provide nutritional info on the menu.
I'm not sure where you live in Oregon, but if I ever move to the west coast I think I want to move in with you! It's great that the local restaurants are getting local produce. I worked at Pizza Hut and during the summer we had a TON of local products we could get. We asked the home offices if we could purchase that instead of ordering from the company and were told NO, even though it would have saved the company money. In fact, we actually got in trouble for buying some thing local if we ran out (ie, green peppers, cucumbers, onions, etc). They said it's because they couldn't control the "quality". I'm glad your area is much smarter.

Believe me, in the summertime, I buy our produce from local farmers. Luckily, I have that option because I live in a fairly rural area and I pass at least 3 roadside stands on my way home from work everyday. One is actually owned by a friend of DH so he usually gives me a good deal. (We also grew some ourselves but didn't pay close attention to the garden so the furry forest critters got most of it). It is harder for people who live in urban areas because alot of time, especially on the east coast, there are very few "local" farms so most of the produce is shipped in from wherever the company can get it.
post #56 of 59
Quote:
We even have a fast food place that uses local ingredients including all natural meat and seasonal fruits.
Burgerville! I love their Walla Walla Onion rings....Oh yes...

I never eat fast food but when I do this is the place I choose.
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC12 View Post
We even have a fast food place that uses local ingredients including all natural meat and seasonal fruits.
Man, Burgerville is my addiction. the Sweet Potato Fries (fall/winter only), the onion rings (summer only, walla walla sweets), Tilamook cheese (local from the Oregon Coast)

Quote:
Originally Posted by calico2222 View Post
I'm not sure where you live in Oregon, but if I ever move to the west coast I think I want to move in with you! It's great that the local restaurants are getting local produce. I worked at Pizza Hut and during the summer we had a TON of local products we could get. We asked the home offices if we could purchase that instead of ordering from the company and were told NO, even though it would have saved the company money.
<<snipped>>
It is harder for people who live in urban areas because alot of time, especially on the east coast, there are very few "local" farms so most of the produce is shipped in from wherever the company can get it.
Burgerville is an awesome example of how 'going local' can work for fast food and restaurants. There are many other regular restaurants around here that are organic and/or locally supplied.

We also have tons of farmers markets as well. practically each neighborhood in Portland has one (although i think they're done for the cold season). We also have local businesses (The Barn out in NE, on 148th, and another one around 162nd, but haven't been to yet) that work with local farmers, farmer co-ops more or less. When i lived in Chicago, we had farmer's markets right in downtown. I wasn't able to grow my own food, but I was able to buy local within a few blocks each week, during the warmer months. Same in Syracuse. We had one large farmer's market (which was SOOO awesome... I still miss the spice guy there)

We have a lot of earthy businesses here. There's the People's Coop, which I've been itching to try out. They're a grocer of sorts and it's ALL organic and much of it local. it's also employee owned, which is awesome. No corporate muckies getting their hands into something they don't belong in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breal76 View Post
Burgerville! I love their Walla Walla Onion rings....Oh yes...

I never eat fast food but when I do this is the place I choose.
Dang it, I'm already craving the Rings again and their season just ended. I also love Chipotle for mexican. Not typically as local, but all organic and prepared fresh each day... even the guacamole.

That's it, I propose a Portland Area TCS meetup at one of the Burgervilles...

Burgerville Love-fest over...

Back to topic...

One thing I like that Whole Foods does is put where the produce came from on the signs. If we demanded that all our grocery stores did that, it could help us all. By knowing where those bananas and apples came from, you would know how local you're eating when you go to the grocery store. One thing my mother taught me was when the price on a produce item goes up, it's usually out of season and therefore has to travel farther to get to your shelves. Artichokes for example. I LOVE artichokes... but when they get above $2 per 'choke, they're usually out of season. Same with Asparagus. I have my favorites, sure, but i'm also trying to branch out and try other things... things that are local to the NW, since I haven't lived here my whole life...

Amanda
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazycatlover View Post
Im not really defensive or angry I just don't find it fair. And how would we determine obesity due to medical issues. I mean really how do we know that people are more likely to be obese due to genetics. The reason I give the example of tax people or make them pay more for company health insurance is what I meant that have diseases is because if they start to do it to obese people and smokers whats next.

I don't believe for one second that all obese people are more unhealthy then all skinny people. I would say that more are unhealthy but certainly not all.
We do agree on that. Life is not fair. Never has been, never will be.

But, I will hazard a guess that 95% of overweight/obese people are that way because of their own poor choices. Irregardless of eating to much, exercising not enough, eating the wrong foods, whatever, it is our own personal responsibility that we weight what we do, in 95% of the cases.

And NOW, we are making our children just as fat as we are. It is sad, particularly when we see commercials with starving little children in Africa.
We should be ashamed of ourselves for our gluttony.
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
After reading some of your posts, I feel I have to apologize for some of my comments. In my mind, it was a cut and dried, simple solution but after reading some of your posts, I realize it is a much more complex issue and that there is no quick, easy fix. My comment about medications for thyroid was ignorant on my part. As the above poster says, not all medications work for everyone.

I do maintain, however, that we all need to learn to eat healthier, complain or boycott or whatever it takes to get some of the preservatives and over-processing out of our foods. The manufacturers that are making the profits are not about to volunteer to do those things, so it's up to the public to initiate change.
I don't believe any harm was done.

But I do agree, we do need healthier eating habits.
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