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Taxing cars in england

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
well i just got back from the post office to tax our 1979 Subaru and you know where you get a moment in time that you are so floored by the price of what you have been told you just hand the money over no questions asked, well i had that moment, £101.75p for a grand total of 6 months my little fiat only costs me £35 a year to tax and the renault is the same

Yes i know it goes on emmisions but still



think ill go and have a little cry now
post #2 of 22
yeah I hear ya on car taxes. To register my car in Maine it cost almost 400 dollars and that was to register it for the second year
post #3 of 22
I don't know what that is in American dollars, but we have to pay to own the cars we bought with our own money too.

There is registration fee which I think was over 100 dollars when I got my car, my "tags" are going to expire in dec. So there's another 47.50 down the tubes...

It's irritating to give people money who all I see do is poke holes in the road and cover them back up.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
yeah all they do over here is dig the road up fill it in and then put speed bumps in

on the plus side petrol has gone down from 114.9p dow to 92.9p
post #5 of 22
the tax disc on a UK car is like the sticker/tag over here - different names but same tax all over the world pretty much.
post #6 of 22
Hurray for taxes, please give us more, we love to pay taxes.
post #7 of 22
101 pounds sterling is about 158 US dollars. $316 on an annual basis is a bit steep, but registration fees here are rising rapidly as state governments try to make up budget shortfalls without raising income taxes. I tried to find a state-by-state listing of registration fees but the only ones I found were serioiusly out of date. I'd guess an average for here now is around $75 for a non-commercial passenger vehicle. Fees are generally lower in states with high state income taxes and higher in states with low state income taxes. Some states also require emission tests which can be quite expensive on an older vehicle that has an emissions problem.
post #8 of 22
In the U.S., it varies by state and there are extreme differences between states. The worst was Missouri, where you pay based on the current value of the car. When I bought a new car while I lived there, my annual tax was roughly $2000 on it. Then they added the registration fees and license plate charges on top of that for another $65.
post #9 of 22
Our licence plate stickers are $75.00 per year. We need to have emission testing done every 2 years on older cars which we have to pay ourselves but that only runs around $100. Our highways are kept in good condition so I don't mind paying.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
they go up every year here or whenever the goverment need a few more quid
post #11 of 22
I'm not sure what a "car tax" is. But in Canada when you buy a car, new or used, you have to pay federal and provincial tax on it.

Then every year you have to pay to register the car in order to drive it. This is is basically insurance. If you don't register the car every year, you can't drive it.

The cost of the registration is dependent on a few things. Any demerits on your drivers license will increase the amount of registration fee you pay. The age and type of car you have plays a factor too. For motorcycles are really expensive to register yearly. Plus they have to pay for a full year but can only really use the vehicle during non-winter months when the streets are clear, so that is really only about 6 months of the year.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
I'm not sure what a "car tax" is. But in Canada when you buy a car, new or used, you have to pay federal and provincial tax on it.

Then every year you have to pay to register the car in order to drive it. This is is basically insurance. If you don't register the car every year, you can't drive it.

The cost of the registration is dependent on a few things. Any demerits on your drivers license will increase the amount of registration fee you pay. The age and type of car you have plays a factor too. For motorcycles are really expensive to register yearly. Plus they have to pay for a full year but can only really use the vehicle during non-winter months when the streets are clear, so that is really only about 6 months of the year.
Car tax there is the same as our sticker, which at least in Ontario is the same price regardless of demerit points and types of car. They need insurance in the UK too which is totally different (and like our insurance works on points on license and type of car etc)
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
I'm not sure what a "car tax" is. But in Canada when you buy a car, new or used, you have to pay federal and provincial tax on it.

Then every year you have to pay to register the car in order to drive it. This is is basically insurance. If you don't register the car every year, you can't drive it.

The cost of the registration is dependent on a few things. Any demerits on your drivers license will increase the amount of registration fee you pay. The age and type of car you have plays a factor too. For motorcycles are really expensive to register yearly. Plus they have to pay for a full year but can only really use the vehicle during non-winter months when the streets are clear, so that is really only about 6 months of the year.
I don't think they are talking about the sales taxes as in our federal and provincial taxes.

The yearly registration you mention I believe is for our licence plate sticker which we need to update/replace every year and has no bearing on the type or age of the car you drive . This is not insurance in any way. It's simply a licencing fee due every year (well, you can pay double and get it for 2 years so you don't have to go every year for a renewal). The license sticker allows you to drive on public streets and has nothing to do with insurance other than you cannot get a sticker for your car if you have no proof of auto insurance.

Insurance is a whole separate matter and that does indeed depend on the type of car, age, and type of coverage. The insurance rates are calculated on many things - cost to repair if you drive a more expensive car, replacement value, age and experience of driver (young men pay much higher rates of insurance than older, more experienced drivers). Insurance for young men usually costs several thousand dollars per year. Motorcycles I'm not familiar with but I would image the rates are based on the risk of injury and claims that could come from an accident.
post #14 of 22
I think some posters here are confusing: sales tax, personal property tax, emissions fees, safety inspections, registration & licensing fees, titling fees, and insurance.

Emissions fees, registration & licensing fees aren't taxes. Safety inspections and insurance have nothing to do with state revenues, they're paid to the respective provider.

I said in my previous post that I couldn't find a current state-by-state schedule of licensing fees. The 2001 schedule that I did find had about $100-some as the highest state licensing fee. The current licensing fee for Missouri is $51.25 http://dor.mo.gov/mvdl/motorv/fees.htm#passenger

Licensing fees and property tax are recurrent on a yearly basis (not all states have personal property tax)

Safety inspections and emissions inspections are sometimes done just when the vehicle is sold and the title transferred; some states require them periodically.

The titling fee is paid once when the vehicle title is transferred.

Sales tax is paid once when the vehicle is sold.

Insurance varies so widely with the location and the driver's age, driving record, even credit rating, that someone saying how much they paid for insurance means only how much they paid; it has no meaning for anyone else.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
The yearly registration you mention I believe is for our licence plate sticker which we need to update/replace every year and has no bearing on the type or age of the car you drive . This is not insurance in any way. It's simply a licencing fee due every year (well, you can pay double and get it for 2 years so you don't have to go every year for a renewal). The license sticker allows you to drive on public streets and has nothing to do with insurance other than you cannot get a sticker for your car if you have no proof of auto insurance.

It's been a while since I've registered a car in Manitoba, but here we have "Autopac" which is insurance registration. You go and pay your fee and get a sticker for your license plate. It's an annual fee of several hundred dollars, that you can pay in one lump sum or every 6 months. Autopac is our vehicle insurance here. If you don't buy it, you can't drive your car because the sticker will be expired which means it's unregistered and uninsured.
post #16 of 22
The Uk is slightly different, Tim. They have an annual tax, a yearly cost that needs to be paid in order to get a tax disc (similar to a stick on license plates here or renewing tags etc) but it doesn't have one price for all vehicles. In the UK you get an MOT (similar to a safety here) and emmissions test. You take those with you to get your tax disc which varies in price according to the age of the car, its emmissions, and the mpg of the car etc.

That is on top of the VAT sales tax they pay on the vehicle, and their vehicle inspections are generally required more often than they are here (usually annually for safety and emmissions test called an MOT and required for cars over 3 years old). Then if you live in London you can add in the congestion charge tax for driving into central London if you have to do that.
post #17 of 22
I just paid $505 (USD) in personal property taxes on a 2006 Honda Accord...ack! They charged me just under $400 last year for the three months I was here. I reallyreally resent that stupid blue tax bill that comes every summer.
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
yeah for new cars you dont need an mot cert until the car is 3 years old, to get a tax disc you need proof of owner ship of the car ie regestration document, then the insurance cover note then mot once 3, when i think about it, it was £101 for tax, £53 for MOT , and £322 for the insurance and we have to do this yearly

it is all based on the carbon emissions coming out of the exhaust or what it should be, and it is placed in a banded category i think we have 6 or 7 classes which range from being free upto £400
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
Then every year you have to pay to register the car in order to drive it. This is is basically insurance. If you don't register the car every year, you can't drive it.
Registration is actually a tax, not insurance, unless you have a flat-fee truly no-fault plan of some type up there.

Here in TX, it's about $70 per car per year.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by boringjen View Post
I just paid $505 (USD) in personal property taxes on a 2006 Honda Accord...ack! They charged me just under $400 last year for the three months I was here. I reallyreally resent that stupid blue tax bill that comes every summer.
Every state that has a personal property tax that has been challenged in federal court has lost. VA is bad about putting laws in place, then enforcing them until they get slapped down. Do you know that VA automatically drops the radar detector ticket if you appeal it? They've lost about 5 times at the federal level, and don't want that to happen any more, so they just dismiss cases that are appealed.

Arkansas has that personal property tax, too. They are losing huge amounts of registration money, because any Arkansas trucking company will register its trucks in another state. They're losing the revenue on some very large companies, such as JB Hunt, who has well over 10,000 trucks.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
....Then if you live in London you can add in the congestion charge tax for driving into central London if you have to do that.
Sheesh......I'd hate to live in London and get a head cold. I always get terrible congestion.

I think vehicle registration fees should be based on the miles driven, not on the value of the car, age, mpg, or anything else. A license is essentially a user fee and I don't see why someone who drives 10,000 miles a year should pay the same as someone who drives 30,000 miles per year.
post #22 of 22
Wow, I'm glad my little 92 Integra only costs $15.80/yr in taxes. It cost $25 I believe to register it when we bought it.

A few friends of mine pay $200-300/yr in taxes for their newer cars though.
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