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Some cat behavior questions

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
As a lot of you know we picked up our kitty a week ago at a local shelter. He's an 8 month old male that is an indoor only cat. I have questions and would appreciate your thoughts and input:

Is it normal for my cat to lick is back-sides clean after pooing (yeck!)? If is, do cats do that after each trip to the litter box (did I say “yeck!” yet?)?

How many times a day does a cat use the litter box? Ours seems to fill it up by the end of the day.

How do you prevent (if even possible) a cat from tracking cat litter on floor when he’s done doing his job in the litter box?

Why does our cat like to perch itself on top of furniture, chairs, etc? Why can't it just lie on the floor like a dog would?

Can a cat be trained to stay off the furniture?

Does a cat usually sleep a lot during the day? Ours doesn't seem to right now. Do cats sleep through the night or do they like to prowl around in the dark at night?

By the way, one other question, our cat seems to "meow" all the time. I didn't think a cat does it that much. Why would that be? Is he trying to tell us something?

Also, our cat likes to rub either side of his head on us, furniture, and other stand-alone items in our house. What is he doing?

Thank you.
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler5 View Post
As a lot of you know we picked up our kitty a week ago at a local shelter. He's an 8 month old male that is an indoor only cat. I have questions and would appreciate your thoughts and input:

Is it normal for my cat to lick is back-sides clean after pooing (yeck!)? If is, do cats do that after each trip to the litter box (did I say “yeck!” yet?)?

Yes, quite normal.

How many times a day does a cat use the litter box? Ours seems to fill it up by the end of the day.

I don't know how many times but our two litter boxes have quite a number of gifts from one day. Litter boxes should be scooped at LEAST once per day.
How do you prevent (if even possible) a cat from tracking cat litter on floor when he’s done doing his job in the litter box?

Why does our cat like to perch itself on top of furniture, chairs, etc? Why can't it just lie on the floor like a dog would?

Cats like to be high up. I'm no expert but I would guess it's because they are low on the food chain and being up high gives them a good lookout. Cats are nothing like dogs so don't expect them to be.

Can a cat be trained to stay off the furniture?

Depends on the cat but I honestly doubt it. Some people say they have had success. (At least when they are there to watch )

Does a cat usually sleep a lot during the day? Ours doesn't seem to right now. Do cats sleep through the night or do they like to prowl around in the dark at night?

Thank you.
Adult/mature cats tend to sleep a lot during the day. Kittens may be more active. I don't know about other cats but our cats both sleep with us and sleep through the night. They may not do this as kittens but should settle down as they mature.
post #3 of 12
Yes, they do lick their back sides after the pooing. I read somewhere a quote that said "Cat's aren't clean, they're just covered in cat spit" I often find myself laughing about it. I never owned a cat before my Jack and it took me a long while to understand the whole licking all over thing--I'm getting better.

I'm not sure what food you are feeding but the higher the quality of food the less frequent of poo visits a cat makes to the box. My boys poo once a day, peeing, much harder to tell with two cats, two boxes and the fact that they are in the basement. I scoop everyday and the boxes are by no means full.

Litter tracking is something everyone stuggles with. My covered boxes help, I keep a little hand broom and dust pan by the boxes and probably twice a week sweep in front of them.

Yea, I agree with Yosemite, cats like to be high up. My Jack has always been a floor sleeper, Harley tends to be a floor sleeper as well. They have two baskets that they sleep in as well. I also agree, put aside any thoughts about cats being anything like dogs. I grew up with dogs in my home and it was a big adjustment understanding cats.

Cats can be trained, can they be trained to stay off furniture--probably depends what the furniture is. My cats not allowed on counters (I know that isn't furniture but nonetheless), Jack never attempted them as a kitten and knows it isn't allowed, when we brought Harley in, I think he realized it wasn't allowed (he lived on the streets prior to us and didn't know life in a house really so). Other than that I can't imagine keeping them off furniture. I want them with me so I don't have an issue with them on the couch with me or wherever.

We wanted Jack to sleep with us as a kitten so we really sort of changed his "clock" by locking him in our bedroom at night. He learned that mommy and daddy sleep at night and switched to that schedule relatively well. He was a kitten so during the day he had a lot of energy but also took lots of kitten naps. We are about 10 days shy of having Jack for 1 year and although he is still very much a kitten he's matured. He doesn't sleep the whole night--granted with a brother to play with now that may affect that alittle. He sleeps a good portion of the day, but is still very willing to play.

Good luck
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
Yes, they do lick their back sides after the pooing. I read somewhere a quote that said "Cat's aren't clean, they're just covered in cat spit" I often find myself laughing about it. I never owned a cat before my Jack and it took me a long while to understand the whole licking all over thing--I'm getting better.

I'm not sure what food you are feeding but the higher the quality of food the less frequent of poo visits a cat makes to the box. My boys poo once a day, peeing, much harder to tell with two cats, two boxes and the fact that they are in the basement. I scoop everyday and the boxes are by no means full.

Litter tracking is something everyone stuggles with. My covered boxes help, I keep a little hand broom and dust pan by the boxes and probably twice a week sweep in front of them.

Yea, I agree with Yosemite, cats like to be high up. My Jack has always been a floor sleeper, Harley tends to be a floor sleeper as well. They have two baskets that they sleep in as well. I also agree, put aside any thoughts about cats being anything like dogs. I grew up with dogs in my home and it was a big adjustment understanding cats.

Cats can be trained, can they be trained to stay off furniture--probably depends what the furniture is. My cats not allowed on counters (I know that isn't furniture but nonetheless), Jack never attempted them as a kitten and knows it isn't allowed, when we brought Harley in, I think he realized it wasn't allowed (he lived on the streets prior to us and didn't know life in a house really so). Other than that I can't imagine keeping them off furniture. I want them with me so I don't have an issue with them on the couch with me or wherever.

We wanted Jack to sleep with us as a kitten so we really sort of changed his "clock" by locking him in our bedroom at night. He learned that mommy and daddy sleep at night and switched to that schedule relatively well. He was a kitten so during the day he had a lot of energy but also took lots of kitten naps. We are about 10 days shy of having Jack for 1 year and although he is still very much a kitten he's matured. He doesn't sleep the whole night--granted with a brother to play with now that may affect that alittle. He sleeps a good portion of the day, but is still very willing to play.

Good luck
That's very helpful information. Thank you.
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
Litter tracking is something everyone stuggles with. My covered boxes help, I keep a little hand broom and dust pan by the boxes and probably twice a week sweep in front of them.
You can also get a special mat to put in front of the litter box that will catch most of the litter stuck to their feet.

If cleaning the box daily is something you find difficult, due to your schedule, to do, you might want to invest in one of the self-cleaning boxes. I have a Litter Robot, for example.

May I say that many of these questions are the sort that should have been considered before adopting a cat, rather than after?
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zane's Pal View Post
You can also get a special mat to put in front of the litter box that will catch most of the litter stuck to their feet.

If cleaning the box daily is something you find difficult, due to your schedule, to do, you might want to invest in one of the self-cleaning boxes. I have a Litter Robot, for example.

May I say that many of these questions are the sort that should have been considered before adopting a cat, rather than after?

Thank you for your help. I'll look into the floor mat, that maybe the ticket.

We picked up our cat about a week ago from the shelter. We've never had a cat before now. I tried to ask as many questions as possible to the members of this site prior to picking up the cat but since we've never had a cat until now I wasn't sure of all the questions I should be asking before getting the cat. If you look at some of my initial posts you'll find that I asked a ton of questions a week before getting the cat.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler5 View Post
Thank you for your help. I'll look into the floor mat, that maybe the ticket.

We picked up our cat about a week ago from the shelter. We've never had a cat before now. I tried to ask as many questions as possible to the members of this site prior to picking up the cat but since we've never had a cat until now I wasn't sure of all the questions I should be asking before getting the cat. If you look at some of my initial posts you'll find that I asked a ton of questions a week before getting the cat.
Hey I think it's great that you are asking all these questions. At least you care enough to ask!! And yes, I'm sure after getting the cat tons of things came up that you wouldn't even have thought of!

I thought your post was really cute.

By the way, one other question, our cat seems to "meow" all the time. I didn't think a cat does it that much. Why would that be? Is he trying to tell us something?


It has only been a week, so I'm guessing the excessive meowing will stop. He is probably calling out to the other cats that aren't there anymore. It could be that he's just a "meowy" vocal sort of cat. My cat was like that. I would just have to make eye contact with her and she would meow in response. It was cute.

Good luck! Sounds like you are a very caring and concerned owner.
post #8 of 12
Its great you are asking so many questions!

Cats are certainly unique creatures...and have VERY important reasons for doing all they do....maybe thats what your kitty is trying to tell you when meowing

Enjoy getting to know your special new addition! They are so much fun.
post #9 of 12
As for why the cat rubs the sides of his face on you?

They have scent glands there and he is putting his scent on you and things are around the house--sort of marking them as his own.

The meowing may very well stick around--both my boys are talkers--we love it!!! They both would sit and chat all day with us. You can often really tell that they are asking questions so to speak.

Leslie
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
That's all great information. Thank you. I think both the cat and our family are still trying to get use to the new situation. He's trying to figure out who we are and his new surroundings, and since we've never had a cat before we're trying to understand cats and cat behavior.

He's a good kitty, though. He's really not hard to adjust to. We all love him and even my wife is warming up to him since bringing him home 10 days ago. I don't know if he likes my 6 year-old son because my son chases him around the house. We've tried to tell him the cat doesn't like it but, what can I say, he's only 6 and like the cat, he's got a mind of his own.
post #11 of 12
Cats don't usually meow amongst themselves but do meow at people. (Exception of course would be unneutered cats calling for mates.)

Some cats are more talkative than others such as Siamese although our two do not talk a lot but definitely when they want something.

It's important that you also train your son not to chase and terrorize the cat or you will end up with a very nervous, skittish cat. Children should always be taught the correct way to relate to animals and kept an eye on when they are with the animal.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
It's important that you also train your son not to chase and terrorize the cat or you will end up with a very nervous, skittish cat. Children should always be taught the correct way to relate to animals and kept an eye on when they are with the animal.

That's a good point. We'll work with our son on that. We don't want a skittish cat. Right now he's pretty much relaxed around us -- as best as I can tell.
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