TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Could the 'Bradley Effect' Hurt Obama?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Could the 'Bradley Effect' Hurt Obama?  

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
http://news.aol.com/elections/articl...817x1200703405


I feel that anything can happen and the bradley Effect will probably play a small factor in the election but I think that another thing could effect it is people will assume Obama will win and not vote cause they don't think they have to because they assume he has already won and more will go out and vote for Mccain then normally would becuase they see that he is behind and want him to get ahead in the polls. It could go either way though. Some people may not go out and vote for Mccain either because they think he has already lost.
That is why it is important for us all to go out and vote no matter what the polls say because we need to choose a president as a country and who America thinks will do the best should become president weather it is Mccain or Obama.
post #2 of 13
I doubt that this election will suffer from lack of voter turn out. There's too much emotion in the air about the candidates. I do expect some degree of Bradley Effect. Less so in the younger generation who didn't live thru the racial tension that us oldsters lived thru.

Absolutely agree with you about the importance of getting out to vote.
post #3 of 13
I don't think people in my generation care much about race. I am a Generation X-er who has always grown up in integrated situations and my parents had friends of different races. My mother being Southern only knew segregation but my 'Yankee' father had more integration growing up.

I doubt there will be much of one. The stakes are too high and the economy is too volatile. People voted him in during the primary which proves it was not a big deal. I think the opposite will happen. I think some people say McCain but will really vote for Obama without letting anyone know.
post #4 of 13
I think there may be a very small "Bradley Effect", but that it will be offset by greater minority and young voter participation. Now I don't remember where I saw the statistics, but more African-Americans and Latinos have registered to vote; I was a bit surprised to see that voter registration among Asian-Americans is still pretty low.

As Amy said, there's a whole new generation of voters to whom segregation is something they only learn about in history class. Over the past three decades, more and more people have had black (or other minority/female) mayors, representatives, governors, or senators, not to mention two African-American Secretaries of State.

I really think/hope that most Americans have rejected the idea that our representatives have to be male WASPs.
post #5 of 13
before this election ever got seriously underway, that if Hillary ran, there would be allegations of huge voter fraud because the exit polls would disagree with the actual ballots. I think that will be a problem for Obama, too, more in some places, less in others.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC12 View Post
I don't think people in my generation care much about race..

I dont think that it is issue with people who care about race. I thnk they are saying some people are afraid that people are going to look at them and say you aren't voting for obama because of his race and people don't want to deal with it so they just say yeah Im voting for him. I think it is silly either way but who knows.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazycatlover View Post
I dont think that it is issue with people who care about race. I thnk they are saying some people are afraid that people are going to look at them and say you aren't voting for obama because of his race and people don't want to deal with it so they just say yeah Im voting for him. I think it is silly either way but who knows.
That's definitely a possibility, but I wonder how many people define him by race, as he's biracial, and has a multiracial family?

I was at an overseas voters meeting recently (bipartisan, racially mixed), and somebody brought up that the German media keep saying that he'll be the first "black" U.S. president if elected, although "African-American" president is correct, and not just to be p.c.. Most people there seemed to consider him both black and white. I'm not sure if that's typical, though, because it was a group of Americans living on foreign soil, and in that situation you're more aware of your "sameness", regardless of race or ethnic background.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
That's definitely a possibility, but I wonder how many people define him by race, as he's biracial, and has a multiracial family?

I was at an overseas voters meeting recently (bipartisan, racially mixed), and somebody brought up that the German media keep saying that he'll be the first "black" U.S. president if elected, although "African-American" president is correct, and not just to be p.c.. Most people there seemed to consider him both black and white. I'm not sure if that's typical, though, because it was a group of Americans living on foreign soil, and in that situation you're more aware of your "sameness", regardless of race or ethnic background.
SO true. During my travels I have noted that too.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazycatlover View Post
I dont think that it is issue with people who care about race. I thnk they are saying some people are afraid that people are going to look at them and say you aren't voting for obama because of his race and people don't want to deal with it so they just say yeah Im voting for him. I think it is silly either way but who knows.
Good point. Just a way not to have to get into a conversation.
post #10 of 13
obam loses if the college kids stay home
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
obam loses if the college kids stay home
Do you think they will? People in that age group seem more excited by this election than past ones. Most of my friends' kids (and my nieces and nephews) are of college age/in college, and seem very "politicized".
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
Do you think they will? People in that age group seem more excited by this election than past ones. Most of my friends' kids (and my nieces and nephews) are of college age/in college, and seem very "politicized".
People under 30 have a long history of being excited about an election, only to not vote when the time came. Some blame both Kerry's and Gore's defeats on this factor, to some extent.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
People under 30 have a long history of being excited about an election, only to not vote when the time came. Some blame both Kerry's and Gore's defeats on this factor, to some extent.
Their little project to get young Jewish voters to flock to FL to get their grandparents to vote was a dud. Over 20,000 signed up, 100 actually went, only to find it was a waste of time.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...hlep-call.html

Let's hope their stellar support continues til election day.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: IMO: In My Opinion
This thread is locked  
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Could the 'Bradley Effect' Hurt Obama?